Who Own High Profile Jamatkhana In Dubai? (Correct answer)

Who was the master and proprietor of the Jamatkhana?

  • “The Sole Owner, Master Proprietor of this Jamatkhana is H. H. Sir Sultan Mohamed Shah Aga Khan…” There was also a wooden board listing the individuals who had served as Mukhis and Kamadias of the Jamatkhana.

What do Ismailis do in Jamatkhana?

They function as religious, educational and social centres, promoting dialogue, discussion and community building. The notion of public and private spaces and restricted participation during the performance of specific practices and prayers is not unique to the Ismaili Tariqah and its Jamatkhanas.

Can Ismaili marry non Ismaili?

All the Ismaili members are equal in the sight of God and to their Imam of the time, which is why I will marry a European, American, or non-Ismaili Muslim. She will have to accept and adhere to the Ismaili traditions and principles because her husband is the leader and Imam of this faith system.

Where was the first Jamatkhana built?

The Atlanta Ismaili Jamatkhana, located in Decatur, opened in February 1989 as the first purpose-built Ismaili Jamatkhana in the United States.

When was the first Jamatkhana built?

after 1473 ) situates one of the earliest of these Jamatkhanas to a place by the name of Kotda, which is thought to be in modern-day Sindh in Pakistan.

Who is the leader of the Ismailis?

Shāh Karim al-Husayni (born 13 December 1936), known by the religious title Mawlana Hazar Imam by his Ismaili followers and elsewhere as Aga Khan IV, is the 49th and current Imam of Nizari Ismailis, a denomination within Shia Islam.

Does Ismailis go to Hajj?

Hajj “pilgrimage”: For Ismā’īlīs, visiting the imām or his representative is one of the most aspired pilgrimages. There are two pilgrimages, Hajj-i-Zahiri and Hajj-i-Batini. The first is the visit to Mecca; the second, being in the presence of the Imam. The Musta’lī also maintain the practice of going to Mecca.

Can a Sunni marry a Ismaili?

No. Ismailis have rejected the fundamentals of Islam, and are out of fold of Islam. Such a marriage will not be valid.

What is khushali?

Imamat Day, also known as Khushali, is celebrated by Nizari Ismaili Shiʿi Muslims to mark the anniversary of the day that their present (Hazar) Imam Aga Khan IV succeeded his predecessor to become the Imam of the Time.

Does Ismailis believe in Imam Mahdi?

The Nizari Ismāʿīlīs maintain that the Shīʿa Ismāʿīlī Imams and Ismaili Muslim thinkers have explained that al-Mahdi is not a single person but actually a function undertaken by some of the hereditary Shīʿa Ismaili Imams from the progeny of Muhammad and Imam ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib.

Who founded Jamat Khana Masjid?

Built by Khizr Khan, son of Sultan Alauddin Khilji (Khilji Dynasty) in 1315-1325 AD, the mosque is the largest structure in the Dargah enclosure.

Who are Ismaili?

The Ismaili Muslims are a culturally diverse community living in over 25 countries around the world. The Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims, generally known as the Ismailis, belong to the Shia branch of Islam. The Shia form one of the two major interpretations of Islam, the Sunni being the other.

How many Jamatkhanas are there in Canada?

There are 65 Jamatkhanas in Canada and 15 in British Columbia, including 7 in the Metro Mainland.

High profile Ismaili Jamatkhanas – Simerg – Insights from Around the World

Associated Press (AP) (Agence France-Presse) In this article:Dubai (United Arab Emirates), travel (travel destinations), tourism (tourism industry), and Dubai (United Arab Emirates)Thursday, January 23, 20202020-01-2309:077507f440ff09e92db75a02bbad20609ccca2In this article:Dubai (United Arab Emirates), travel (Travel Destinations), tourism (Travel Industry), and Dubai (Travel Industry). A record 16.73 million travelers visited FreeDubai in 2019, an increase over the previous two years, thanks to increased numbers of Chinese, Russian, and Omani tourists.

As the global economy remains in flux, “we clearly see an exciting opportunity to further grow Dubai’s dominance in the tourism industry in 2020,” said Saeed al-Marri, the chairman of Dubai Tourism, in a statement released by the Dubai Media Office.

According to nation of origin, Indian tourists accounted for approximately two million visitors to Dubai in 2018, a little decrease from the previous year’s figure.

The United Kingdom came in third place with 1.2 million visitors, the same as the previous year.

  • To reach 989,000, Chinese tourists surged by 15.5%, while Russian tourists increased by 7.4%, to reach 728,000.
  • The United Arab Emirates (UAE) announced a multiple-entry visa program earlier this month that is valid for five years and is open to citizens of all countries worldwide.
  • There are great expectations in the emirate that the six-month global trade exhibition Expo 2020, which will begin in October, would help to turn around its economic situation.
  • The government expects Expo to draw 25 million visitors, the most of whom will be from outside the country, and to generate $17.4 billion in additional income, a 25 percent increase over the previous year.
  • Shopping malls, resorts, and even an indoor ski slope may be found in plenty in this desert metropolis.

About the Ismaili Centres

The Ismaili Centres serve as symbolic reminders of the ongoing presence and essential principles of Ismaili communities all throughout the world, and they are a source of pride for them. In the Muslim religious landscape for many centuries, a significant characteristic has been the diversity of places of gathering coexisting happily with the masjid, which has in turn accommodated a range of various institutional spaces for educational, social, and contemplative purposes. ” These venues, which have historically served people of many religious and spiritual beliefs and connections, have preserved their cultural nomenclatures and features, ranging from ribat and zawiyya to khanaqa and jamatkhana.

  • The Shia Ismaili tariqah of Islam will have its own section of the website dedicated to its traditions and activities.
  • They serve as symbolic reminders of the Ismaili community’s long-term presence in the areas where they have established themselves across the world.
  • In addition to serving as ambassadorial centers, they symbolize the Ismaili community’s perspective toward Islam and modern life, while reaching out with a hand of friendship and understanding to strengthen partnerships across faith communities, government, and civil society organizations.
  • Cultural, educational, and social programs are promoted from the broadest, non-denominational views possible within the ethical framework of Islam, and they help to make this possible.
  • As a result, the Centres are not only places of spiritual exploration, but they are also sites for extending intellectual horizons and cultivating a respect for diversity and plurality.
  • When Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and Ismaili Imam Mawlana Hazar Imam jointly dedicated this high-profile structure in April 1985, it was a watershed moment in the history of Ismaili presence in Europe.
  • The third Ismaili Center, located in Lisbon, opened its doors in 1998.
  • The interaction and juxtaposition of outdoor and internal areas, in particular, give the building a distinctive visual character that reflects both the local setting and features of Islam’s architectural legacy, as well as the structure’s location in the city.
  • Compared to its predecessors in London, Vancouver, and Lisbon, the Centre is equivalent in terms of extent and architectural quality.
  • The Ismaili Centre was built on land donated by the Ruler of Dubai, His Highness Sheikh Mohammad bin Rashid Al-Maktoum.
  • The Foundation Ceremony for the Ismaili Centre in Toronto, Canada, took place in May 2010, and the Center officially opened its doors to the public in September of same year.

The Ismaili Centres, which are founded on the idea of regard for human dignity, attempt to empathize with others while also broadening our intellectual, cultural, and moral horizons. Each of them serves as a protection and a symbol of the fundamental ideals of the Ismaili Muslim tradition.

The History of Jamatkhanas and Their Significance

Despite the fact that prayer and worship are fundamental principles in Islam, Muslims have traditionally expressed their religion in a variety of ways.” It is through their houses of prayer, known now as the Jamatkhana, that Ismailis have been able to express their sense of belonging wherever they have resided throughout history. Other Muslim groups refer to their religious structures by a variety of titles, ranging from ribat and zawiyya to khanaqa. Furthermore, there are other sites where Muslims of various interpretations can join together, such as non-denominational mosques, where they can worship together.

  1. .
  2. Despite the fact that prayer and worship are fundamental principles in Islam, Muslims have traditionally practiced their faith in a variety of ways.
  3. “The entire universe is a mosque,” according to a well-known hadith, or statement, of the Prophet Muhammad.
  4. Many Sufi Tariqahs (community of interpretation of Islam) have developed throughout history, including branches of the Shia and Sunni faiths as well as numerous Sunni and Shia sects.
  5. The Jamatkhana is one of the many different types of venues.
  6. It means “the house of the community” and means “the house of the community.” When we talk about mosques, we’re talking about places where members of particular Sunni and Shia sects assemble for prayers and communal events.
  7. As with other Muslim places of assembly, the Jamatkhanas have undergone changes in both function and appearance throughout time, reflecting changes in the historical and cultural backdrop of these institutions, as well as changes in the requirements of the local community.
  8. Pir Sadardin, according to Aziz Esmail’s book A Scent of Sandalwood, is credited with “the establishment of the first jamatkhana (community center) at Kotdi (in Sind),” according to the author.
  9. These have become the primary meeting places for the Jamat in today’s world, and they have become the primary location of gathering for the Jamat.
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At the 2008 dedication ceremony for the Ismaili Jamatkhana and Center in Khorog, Tajikistan’s Mawlana Hazar Imam stated, “The Jamatkhana will be reserved for traditions and practices specific to the Shia Ismaili tariqah of Islam,” and the Jamatkhana will be reserved for “traditional and practices specific to the Shia Ismaili tariqah of Islam.” It is important to note that the Jamatkhana has a huge impact on the lives of the Jamat.

Together, we pray, create our community, enhance our identity, facilitate intellectual and social growth, and reaffirm our principles via service.

Jamatkhanas are places of calm and tranquility, imbued with a sense of humility and prayer, as Mawlana Hazar Imam stated during the founding ceremony of Dhaka Jamatkhana in 2008.

In this pluralistic society, it will be a place where men and women may work together to develop those shared links that reflect our common concerns and that will create our common destiny.” Additional resources for learning more about the history of Jamatkhanas are listed below: How Does Shi’a Islam Differ From Sunni Islam?, Dr.

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Please complete the survey by clicking on the link provided. ExplorePart 2 – The Importance of Ismaili Centers as Cultural Ambassadors Return to Diamond Jubilee International Education Themes (previous page).

High Profile Jamatkhana and Aga Khan Museum in Toronto: Groundbreaking by H.H. The Aga Khan – 2010-05-28

Posted on the 28th of May, 2010 by heritage Taking place today in Toronto, Canada, the Aga Khan Museum and Ismaili Centre is a fitting tribute to the man who has done so much to advance our understanding of Islamic art and culture – and who continues to work tirelessly on humanitarian projects around the world – and who has done so much to further our understanding of Islamic art and culture. This man is a visionary in every sense of the word. I suppose it’s no surprise that he and Trudeau developed a strong relationship over time, a connection that actually began when Canada accepted thousands of Ismaili Muslims fleeing Idi Amin’s Uganda in 1972.

Speech by H.H. The Aga Khan at the Foundation of the Ismaili Centre, Toronto, the Aga Khan Museum and their Park – 2010-05-28

Published on May 28th, 2010 by ancestors Taking place today in Toronto, Canada, the Aga Khan Museum and Ismaili Centre is a fitting tribute to the man who has done so much to further our understanding of Islamic art and culture – and who continues to work tirelessly on humanitarian projects around the world – and who has done so much to further our understanding of Islamic art and culture. Clearly, this individual have vision. I suppose it’s no surprise that he and Trudeau developed a strong relationship over time, a relationship that actually began when Canada accepted thousands of Ismaili Muslims fleeing Idi Amin’s Uganda in 1972.

More information on High Profile Jamat Khana in Houston

On its way to the building afterlife, the 1929 Robinson Public Warehouse (designed by architects Nimmons, Carr, and Wright), located at the junction of Allen Parkway and Montrose Blvd, is being demolished. When it was built in the mid- to late-1940s, it served as the first (and only) home of Baylor College of Medicine. It was formerly a store for Sears, Roebuck, and Company. The demolition process is set to begin, and we’ve been keeping an eye out for the wrecking ball, which is expected to arrive at any moment now.

After being demolished in 1999 to make way for the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, the Gulf Publishing Building was replaced by what is now known as Royalton at River Oaks (though, according to the developer, “Much care was taken to preserve the historical significance of the original Gulf Publishing Building, built in 1929, that once stood on the site.

The frieze that presently greets inhabitants used to adorn the façade of the Gulf Publishing building,” says the author.

It is expected that the structure would be comparable to previous centers created by the foundation, according to Zahir Janmohamed, CEO of the Aga Khan Council of the United States of America.

was considering incorporating the warehouse into its residential plans, there was some optimism for the warehouse’s long-term survival, but that hope was short-lived. Unfortunately, that effort failed to materialize, as did many other hoped-for rehabilitation initiatives in Houston.

Jamatkhanas in USA – Page 5 – Ismailimail

The Robinson Public Warehouse (designed by architects Nimmons, Carr, and Wright in 1929), located at the junction of Allen Parkway and Montrose Blvd, is on its way to the building afterlife, according to the Los Angeles Times. When it was built in the mid- to late-1940s, it was the first (and only) home of Baylor College of Medicine. It was previously a store for Sears, Roebuck, and Company. A wrecking ball is expected to arrive any time now, and we’ve been keeping our eyes out for it since it was announced that demolition will begin soon.

The 1937 Jefferson Davis Hospital was demolished in 1999 to make way for the Dallas Federal Reserve Bank, and the Gulf Publishing Building was replaced by the now-demolished Royalton at River Oaks (though, according to the developer, “Great care was taken to preserve the historical significance of the original Gulf Publishing Building, built in 1929, that once stood on the site.

According to Zahir Janmohamed, the CEO of the United States Aga Khan Council, the structure would be comparable to other centers created by the foundation in the past.

was considering incorporating the warehouse into its housing plans, there was some optimism for the warehouse’s long-term survival, but that dream was dashed.

Why Ismaili Jamatkhanas are only open to Ismailis for prayers

It is through their halls of prayer, known now as theJamatkhana, that Ismailis have been able to express their cultural identity wherever they have been throughout history. There are other more Muslim groups that have given their holy structures unusual names, such as fromribatandzawiyyatokhanaqa. Furthermore, there are other sites where Muslims of various interpretations can join together, such as non-denominational mosques, where they can worship together. Aga Khan IV, Imam Shah Karim al-Husayni, is the fourth Imam of the Aga Khan lineage (Toronto Ismaili Centre Opening Ceremony, Toronto, September 12, 2014,Read at NanoWisdoms) Each and every Ismaili Muslim ormurid has entered into a spiritual contractor covenant with theIsmaili Imam of the Time, which is known as Bay’Ahis.

  1. In Islam, thebay’ah is a two-way contract that contains commitments from both the buyer and the seller.
  2. You can performbay’ah, but you must first comprehend its significance before you can offerbay’ah.
  3. When you offer your hand to me, it indicates that you are making a vow.
  4. Those who face the pains and sufferings of the Day of Judgment will experience great fear and pain.

Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III, also known as Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah Aga Khan III (Manjewadi, October 31, 1903, quoted in Kamaluddin Ali,Practices and Ceremonies) Becausebay’ahis a two-way contract involving both theurid and the Imam, only those who have givenbay’ahto the Imam of the time have access to private discursive spaces and private religious practices offered by the Imam in theJamatkhanah, while those who have not given thisbay’ahare not privy to these spaces or religious practices.

  • Every single Ismaili ritual activity conducted in theJamatkhanahis an expression and enactment of the Imam- muridrelationship, a connection that can only exist because of bay’ah.
  • If someone hasn’t offered bay’ah, then participating in theJamatkhanahpractices is a complete waste of time.
  • First and foremost, it is the parents’ responsibility to instill mymurid values in their children through the performance of bay’ah.
  • In the same way that you sign a contract in your company and other activities, I extract a signature from your soul through the Bay’ah process.
  • According to the Qur’an, the Prophet should only grant advice, blessings, and intercession to people after they have given him theirbay’ah (pledge of allegiance).
  • At one point during the Fatimid period, the Ismailis were invited to participate inmajalis al-hikma (sessions of knowledge), a rite of passage that was only open to those who had sworn their loyalty to the Imam-of-the-time.
  • However, this is not a uniquely Ismaili tradition; Sufi Muslims have convened in secret areas for prayer, scholarly conversation, and spiritual rituals for thousands of years, regardless of their sect.

Sufis of the Naqshbandi school offer bay’ah to their Shaykh.

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srcset=” 638w,150w,300w” sizes=”(max-width: 638px) 100vw, 638px”>Naqshbandi Sufis offer bay’ah to their Shaykh.

” data-medium-file=” data-large-file=” src=” h=500″ alt=”Naqshbandi sufis performing the bayah ritual in Lefke, Cyprus.

In Lefke, Cyprus, there is an urs of Mawlana Cheikh Muhammad Nazim Adil al-Haqqani.” srcset=”h=500 750w,h=100 150w,h=200 300w,h=512 768w,1024w” sizes=”(max-width: 750px) 100vw, 750px”>Naqshbandi sufis conducting the bayah rite.

As a result of many centuries of expansion and expansion, Sufitariqas (orders) have grown and expanded throughout the Muslim world, from North Africa to the Indian subcontinent.

It was necessary to have elaborate initiation ceremonies established, in which the student was required to declare thebay’ah (oath of loyalty) to themurshid and be invested with emblems of their entry into the order (e.g., cloak, hat, etc.).

Admission to such places is normally free and available to the public, however this is not always the case.

For example, Sunni jurists have argued that the exclusivity of such locations is determined by tradition.

Karim Jiwani, a.k.a (Muslim Spaces of Piety and Worship,Read at IIS Website) Sufi Muslim gatherings are held around the world.

For example, in contrast to the khanqah of Iran and Central Asia, which was sometimes a big establishment supported by endowments, the Chishti jama’at khana was primarily a house for theshaykh and his family.

Farid al-Din Ganj-I Shakkar, one of the first Chishti teachers, claimed that this was the regular practice of affiliation for the order.

An organization known as simplejama’at khna was also established by Nizam al-Din Awliya, and the same model was adopted by Burhan al-Din Gharib and Zayn al-Din Shirazi.

Carl Ernst is a composer and musician who lives in Germany (Eternal Garden: Mysticism, History and Politics at a South Asian Sufi Center, 132) The private Sufi spaces – theribat, khanaqa, zawiya, and so on – as well as the Ismaili private space, theJamatkhanah, are distinct from the mosque as an institutional structure (masjid).

  1. These are private denominational venues that serve certain groups of Muslims who participate in the Islamic esoteric domain named astariqah– this is why Ismailism and the Sufi brotherhoods are referred to as ” tariqahs ” in modern times.
  2. The Shari’ah is defined as the circumference of a circle.
  3. The Haqiqah serves as the focal point.
  4. The Tariqah is the area around the Radius.

Tariqah is more important than Shariah, and Haqiqah is more important than Tariqah.” srcset=”h=608 750w,h=122 150w,h=243 300w,h=622 768w,h=829 1024w,1500w” h=608 750w,h=122 150w,h=243 300w,h=622 768w,h=829 1024w,1500w sizes Equals sizing” (max-width: 750px) 100vw, 750px is a good starting point “> The following is an example of a formalized formalized formalized The Shari’ah is defined as the circumference of a circle.

  1. The Tariqah is the area around the Radius.
  2. Tariqah is more important than Shariah, and Haqiqah is more important than Tariqah.
  3. Because it is the heart of the Islamic message, it is concealed from outward view, just as the physical heart is, despite the fact that it is the inner source of life and the center that coordinates the entire religious organism of Islam from inside.
  4. Seyyed Hossein Nasr, also known as Seyyed Nasr (Ideals and Realities of Islam) Finally, Tariqah Islam is a greater sphere of Truth and practice than Shari’ah Islam in terms of both truth and practice.
  5. Since there is a distinction between exoteric legal Islam and esoteric spiritual Islam, it is logical for individuals of the Tariqah to have separate physical venues in which to practice their respective forms and degrees of Islam.

As a result of the logic of Revelation, there must be distinct physical and social domains of public/Seen physical and social space as well as private/Unseen physical and social space as differentiated spaces for the social elaboration and operation of spatially differentiated truths and meanings, according to the logic of Revelation.

  • As a result, it can be considered a hybrid public-private space, or a private-public space.
  • This means that a person’s act of meaning-making may be classified as personal in that it takes place within the individual self, public in that it is communicated to others, and private in that it is transmitted to an extremely restricted and qualified audience.
  • What that something is, for the most part, is a common education that produces shared attitudes about the nature of Truth.
  • When discourse and actions remain in the space of the private/high/kh, they are unaffected by the normative truths and values of the mm/lower/public space—and are in that space governed by the normative truths and values of the private/high/kh space, respectively.
  • ), (What is Islam?
  • Those who seek to visit the House of the Prophet, or the homes of other people in general, must follow a precise procedure as down by the Qur’an: “O you who have believed, do not enter the dwellings of the Prophet until when you are permitted.”– Holy Qur’an 33:53 O ye who have faith!

– Holy Qur’an, verse 27 As a conclusion, while non-denominationalmasjids or mosques serve as public gathering places for the performance of Islamic rituals such as the exotericnamaz(salah), the Ismaili Jamatkhanah serves as a private space reserved for Ismaili Tariqah practices, with access restricted to those who have given bay’ah to the Imam.

These spaces, which have historically served communities with varying interpretations and spiritual affiliations, have retained their cultural nomenclatures and characteristics, ranging fromribatandzawiyyatokhanaqaandjamatkhana toribatandzawiyyatokhanaqaandjamatkhana.

Traditions and rituals unique to Shia Ismailitariqahof Islam will be celebrated in this section of the site. Aga Khan IV, Imam Shah Karim al-Husayni, is the fourth Imam of the Aga Khan lineage (Ismaili Centre Foundation Stone Ceremony, Dubai, December 13,Read on NanoWisdoms)

Ismaili Muslims hire rising architect Farshid Moussavi to design first U.S. cultural center in Houston

According to a statement released on Wednesday, the international Ismaili Muslim community is pushing forward with plans to establish its first U.S. cultural center in Houston and to build an architectural monument in the heart of the city that would symbolize a culture of tolerance, variety, and learning. Farshid Moussavi Architecture, headquartered in London, has been selected to design the crucial new structure, which will be located on an 11-acre site at the southeast corner of Allen Parkway and Montrose Boulevard in downtown Los Angeles.

According to Dr.

It will be designed to embrace its surroundings while also symbolizing core Ismaili values, in the same way that the Ismaili centers in London, England, Burnaby, British Columbia, Lisbon, Portugal, Dushanbe, Tajikistan, Dubai, UAE, and Toronto, Ontario, which were all built between 1985 and 2014, were.

  • “All of them were designed by architects of great international standing, and, I would emphasise, of great multicultural sensitivity,” His Highness the Aga Khan, the world’s Ismaili spiritual leader, said when the Toronto center first opened its doors in 2014.
  • The Aga Khan Foundation purchased the Houston property in 2006 and donated the seven monumental artworks in 2011.
  • “Our team contributes a wide viewpoint, as well as different talents and expertise in international practice, academic research, multidisciplinary thinking, and effectively implementing cultural initiatives in the United States,” she explained.
  • The organization did not share any preliminary drawings, while Samji stated that the Center “should be uniquely American and Texan in its style, but representative of Houston’s varied cultures,” according to the group.
  • Until Moussavi’s drawings are completed, Samji added, a building schedule and budget will not be decided.

Even though the building will hold a Jamatkhana, a space for spiritual reflection and prayer services, it will also serve as an educational and cultural ambassador for the community, presenting public events that encourage culture and information exchange as well as civics and religious discussion.

According to Afshi Charania Merchant, a local member, “Ismailis are a highly charitable group who are also very service-oriented and involved.” “Volunteering is an important element of our culture, and we place a strong emphasis on programming and intellectual engagement.” With an estimated 40,000 members, the Ismaili Muslim community in Houston is one of the nation’s largest in the United States.

  • There are 15 million followers of the Shia branch of Islam in the world, who belong to a varied group of people.
  • Additionally, all of the main Ismaili facilities include courtyards and green space in addition to their program halls.
  • In addition to serving as the structural design consultant, Hanif Kara, co-founder of AKT II and a professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, also serves as the architect of record.
  • Mayor Sylvester Turner hailed the development as a watershed moment in the city’s history.

According to the Kinder Foundation, which is the benefactor behind a number of Houston’s public-private park renovation projects, this is “tremendous news for Houston and additional proof of our expanding status as a worldwide metropolis and cultural hub.” ‘Not only will the Ismaili Cultural Center be a beautiful compliment to Buffalo Bayou Park, but the world-class design team behind it.

Despite the fact that Moussavi has designed apartment buildings, cultural spaces, parks, and retail stores all over the world, the Ismaili Center Houston will be only her second project in the United States, following the $18.7 million Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, which opened its doors in 2012.

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Additionally, Whiting considers it notable that the Aga Khan selected a woman to lead the initiative.

Furthermore, she believes that the site is important for the city since it serves as a northern anchor for the cultural corridor that begins at the southern end of Montrose and ends at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

The Cistern at Buffalo Bayou Park and other planned facilities are part of a cultural corridor that is taking shape from east to west, running from Bayou Bend to Rienzi (both of which are located on the bayou).

She already has plans to collaborate with the Houston Ismaili Center on programs. “I can’t think of a finer place to be than there,” she added of the location. This will be particularly crucial in terms of how they interact with the community. [email protected]

Jama’at Khana

Not to be confused with the Arabic wordMusallah. It is a fusion of the Arabic wordjama’a (gathering) and the Persian wordkhana (congregational place), which literally translates as “congregational place” (house, place). The phrase is used by various Muslim groups across the world, notably sufiones, to designate a location where people assemble to pray. Among some Muslim groups, the phrase is frequently used interchangeably with the Arabic word musallah (God is great) (a place of worship that has not been formally sanctified as amasjidor is a place that is being temporarily used as a place of worship by a Muslim).

The Jamatkhana as a place of gathering and prayer

A variety of spaces for Islamic communal purposes can currently be found throughout the Muslim world, although themasjid (literally: the place of a Muslim’s sujoodor prostration before God) ormosque (in English) is the term used by the Qur’an to denote the primary space ofsalaat (communal Muslim prayers). Some are localized within certain geographic locations, and others are used by distinct populations in different parts of the world. Husayniyas (also known as Ashurkhanas, Imambaras, Matams, ortekiyas) are used by Ithna ‘Ashari Shi’i groups; “khanaqas, ribats, tekkes, andzawiyas are used by mystically-oriented Muslim communities often referred to as Sufis; thecemeviof the Turkish Alevis; and themajlis Jamatkhana is the principal place of religious and social meeting forNizr Ism’ls, and it is located in Nizrabad.

When theChistiSufitariqa meets with thepiror instructor, they hold their meetings at theirJamatkhanas.

When it comes to several Musta’li Ismaili groups in South Asia and their diasporic populations, it is traditional for them to have a Jamatkhana in the same complexes as their Masjids.

The termJamatkhanais used to refer to a venue where Sunni Muslims called asMemons assemble for cultural events and significant occasions, such as weddings.

The Jamatkhana in Nizārī Ismā’īlīsm

The actual roots of the use of Jamatkhana in theNizr Ism’l tradition are currently unknown, however it is believed to have originated in Iran. Community memory, oral traditions, and individualGinans (Indo-Muslim religious poems) all claim that Pirs Shams (fl. between the 13th and 15th centuries) and Sadr al-Din (fl. 14th century), emissaries appointed by theIsmaili ImaminPersia and sent to the South Asiain the service of the faith, were responsible for establishing the first such spaces for the nascentNizri Ism’ Agranthand, a lengthy composition by Sayyid Imamshah (d.

Theyukhi (Sanskrit:mukhya) was the village headman, and theyukhi (Sanskrit:mukhya) was intimately affiliated with the Jamatkhana as an official, according to the same composition.

Earliest Jamatkhanas

The specific roots of the use ofJamatkhanain theNizr Ism’l tradition are currently unknown, however it is believed to have originated in the Islamic heritage. Community memory, oral traditions, and individualGinans (Indo-Muslim religious poems) all claim that Pirs Shams (fl. between the 13th and 15th centuries) and Sadr al-Din (fl. 14th century), emissaries appointed by theIsmaili ImaminPersia and sent to the South Asiain the service of the faith, were responsible for establishing the first such spaces for the nascentNizr Ism’l Sayyid Imamshah (d.

Theyukhi (Sanskrit:mukhya) was the village headman, and theyukhi (Sanskrit:mukhya) was intimately affiliated with theJamatkhana as an official, according to this same composition.

Evolution of the Jamatkhana

By the mid-19th century, as Nizr Ism’l communities migrated from towns and villages to urban centers throughout the Indian Ocean littoral, thekhanaseems to have evolved into a distinct space housed in a separate structure, which was typically located within anohalla, or enclave, ofSatpanthibelievers. Thekhanaseems to have evolved into a distinct space housed in a separate structure, which was usually located within anohall There are several Jamatkhanas that date back to this time period that are still in existence.

These ancient urban constructions may be seen in areas like as Gwadar (modern-day Pakistan), Zanzibar, and Bombay, among other locations (present day India).

The architecture and organization of these spaces demonstrates that there was no single architectural template or model for theJamatkhana, but that each was built in response to a unique set of circumstances, which included factors such as location, cultural environment, architectural practices of the time period, and resources that were readily available at the time.

A number of these were a result of the cultural context in which theJamatkhanaswere located, while others were a result of broader traditions of pietic and religious culture, which in turn influenced the principles of decorum and politeness that prevailed inside these venues.

When the phrase was first used, it was used to refer to the Imam’s principal house.

Today, there are Darkhana Jamatkhanas in eight countries that follow the Nizr Ism’l heritage. India, Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Canada, Pakistan, England, and Portugal are among the countries represented.

Jamatkhana as the Centre of Nizārī Ismā’īlī Practice

While theJamatkhana was originally intended to be a space of congregation for Satpanthi communities, it has since been adopted by Ismaili communities from a variety of geographical, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds as well as historical experiences, who had previously congregated in places with a variety of trajectories and nomenclatures before this. For seven decades, under Sir Sultan Mohammed Shah, Aga Khan III’s (d. 1957) leadership, official links with Ismaili communities in Tajikistan, Afghanistan, China, the Northern Areas of Pakistan, Iran, and Syria were built upon the foundation of mutual respect and understanding.

  • However, because of political limitations, these Jamat Khana’s were not open venues like the other Jamat Khana’s; instead, the followers would gather at a specified residence and complete all of the rites there.
  • Specifically, they were referred to as the gupti community.
  • 1938) to these various localities to plant the seeds of what would become known as the Aga Khan Foundation.
  • However, it was not until the term and leadership of His Highness Prince Karim Aga Khan (b.
  • In certain regions of Iran, locations known as askhane-ye kolonandkhanqahpreceded theJamatkhana by a few years.

Nizārī Ismā’īlī Centres

In Dushanbe, there is an Ismaili Center. During the year 1979, the foundation stone was placed for what would become the world’s first ‘Ismaili Centre’ in the London neighborhood of South Kensington. When Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher (1925–2013; r. 1979–90) officially dedicated the structure in the presence of His Highness the Aga Khan in April 1985, it marked the beginning of a new chapter in the history of Ismaili presence in Europe. Thatcher was the first British Prime Minister to do so.

1939; r.

These purpose-built centers, each of which is architecturally distinct and constructed by internationally renowned architects, are located in prominent locations in their respective cities and include, in addition to a central prayer hall, spaces to facilitate intellectual and social gatherings, meeting rooms, educational facilities, libraries, gardens, and water features, among other amenities.

Portugal’s third ‘Ismaili Centre’ was dedicated in 1998, and it is located in the capital city of Lisbon.

A special feature of the building is how the interplay and combination of outdoor and indoor spaces creates a completely different aesthetic and feel from the other Ismaili Centres that were designed two decades earlier, demonstrating yet again how time and space influence contemporary Ismaili religious architecture.

Located on property granted by Shaykh Mohammed b.

The design of the structure is inspired by Cairo’sFatimid architectural legacy, which dates back to the 10th century and was built by the Aga Khan’s forebears and former Imams of theNizr Ism’l community.

Opening on October 12, 2009 in the presence of the Republic’s President, Emamoli Rahmon, and the Aga Khan, its architecture incorporates a diverse range of artisanal and craft traditions from across the region, drawing inspiration from the grand courtyards of Samarkand and Khiva in Uzbekistan, as well as the Samanid mausoleum, which dates back to the 10th century.

The Ismaili Centre, Toronto, is the second Ismaili Centre to be built in Canada.

It follows the pattern of earlier buildings, which represent both functionally and symbolically the presence of Ismaili communities in Europe and North America.

The Aga Khan Museum and the Toronto Ismaili Centre are both located on the same grounds. Additional Ismaili Centers, at various phases of development, will open in the near future. Centers in Houston, Texas, and Los Angeles, California, for example, are in the works.

See also

  • GYMKHANA is an Anglo-Indian phrase that is taken from the Persian term Jamat-khana.

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