Where To Report Scammers Dubai? (Best solution)

You can report cybercrimes online through the following channels:

  • the eCrime website.
  • Aman service- Abu Dhabi Police.
  • Dubai Police’s website.
  • the ‘My Safe Society’ app launched by the UAE’s federal Public prosecution (the app is available on iTunes or Google Play)
  • You can report scam numbers by calling the toll-free number 800-2626, send an SMS at 2828 or email them at [email protected]. SHARJAH AND AJMAN Residents of Sharjah and Ajman can also contact the respective call centre for the emirate’s police authorities by dialling 901. They can choose the relevant department they wish to speak to.

How do I report a scammer in Dubai?

Dubai victims can call 901 to get full support and guidance on what to do. Victims can use Smart Police Stations (SPS) across the emirate to report the crime or lodge a complaint via E-Crime platform.

How do I report a scammer in UAE?

The Aman Service is an initiative by the police authorities to work with the public to constantly improve the security of the citizens and residents. You can report scam numbers by calling the toll-free number 800-2626, send an SMS at 2828 or email them at [email protected]

Should I report a scammer to the police?

It is generally best to file a police report on a scammer, reach out to your bank, and file a complaint with the appropriate federal agency as soon as possible after you have been scammed. Upon reaching out to the police, they will ask you for the information they need to file the report.

Can Dubai police call you?

Scam Alert: Dubai Police will never call to ask for an OTP Dubai Police will never call from a 050 number or any other variation of that.

How do I file a complaint against a fake call?

yes, you can lodge a complain. You go to the nearest police station and lodge a complain against all the mobile numbers which sends you unwanted sms or gives you unwanted call. Police can investigate the complain under IT ACt, IPC, TR Act.

What is the punishment for cyber crime in Dubai?

Violators will face at least one year in prison and a minimum Dh100,000 fine. The penalty increases to two years in prison and a minimum Dh200,000 fine if the crime was committed during pandemics, emergencies and crises.

How do I get my money back from a scammer?

Contact your bank immediately to let them know what’s happened and ask if you can get a refund. Most banks should reimburse you if you’ve transferred money to someone because of a scam.

What happens if I get scammed?

Report a Scam to the FTC When you report a scam, the FTC can use the information to build cases against scammers, spot trends, educate the public, and share data about what is happening in your community. If you were scammed, report it to the FTC at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

What if a scammer has my phone number?

By having your cell number, a scammer could trick caller ID systems and get into your financial accounts or call financial institutions that use your phone number to identify you. Once the scammer convinces your carrier to port out your number, you may never get it back.

How you can report phone scammers in the UAE

Security and safety of its people and residents are top priorities for the United Arab Emirates, which has taken steps to combat all sorts of crime, including scammers and fraudsters. These phone fraudsters are persons who prey on naive and gullible inhabitants of the United Arab Emirates using a variety of strategies known as phishing assaults in order to defraud them of their hard-earned money. In order to counteract these scammers, police officials in the United Arab Emirates have made it possible for citizens to report phone scams so that prompt action may be taken against them.

HOW TO REPORT PHONE SCAMS IN THE UAE

If you have received a phone call from a scammer in the United Arab Emirates, here is how you may report them to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

DUBAI

Do you want to know how to report scam phone numbers in Dubai? The e-Crime service of the Dubai Police allows you to report bogus calls online (image credit: Dubai Police website) Are you looking for the best place to report phone frauds in Dubai? If you get a phone scam call, you may report it to the Dubai Police by using one of the methods listed below. To begin, dial the toll-free contact center number 901 (which is available 24 hours a day). You will be prompted to pick the department with which you wish to communicate.

You may use this method to report a fraud number to the Dubai Police.

E-crime reporting is handled through a platform dedicated to all types of cybercrime, which encompasses everything from email to social media to hacking and blackmail, to name a few examples.

ABU DHABI

Residents of Abu Dhabi can report phone frauds in the United Arab Emirates through the Aman Service, which is run by the Abu Dhabi Police Department. Police officials have launched the Aman Service as part of an effort to collaborate with the public in order to continuously enhance the security of people and communities. You may report scam numbers by dialing the toll-free number 800-2626, sending an SMS to 2828, or sending an email to [email protected] You can also report fraud numbers by visiting the website.

SHARJAH AND AJMAN

If you live in Sharjah or Ajman, you can also contact the police authorities in those emirates through their local call centers by dialing 901. They have the option of selecting the appropriate department with whom they desire to communicate. Do you want to know where you can file a complaint regarding bogus calls in the United Arab Emirates? Many individuals are not aware that in the United Arab Emirates, dialing 901 is the proper method for reporting scam phone calls. Phone fraudsters will also frequently pose as representatives from your telecom provider (such as du or Etisalat) or bank in order to obtain sensitive and secret information from you.

You may report suspicious calls in the UAE by contacting the necessary customer service lines, which will then notify the authorities, who will then take the required action.

HOW DO YOU IDENTIFY PHONE SCAMMERS AND FRAUDSTERS IN THE UAE?

For example, scammers may frequently appear to be phoning from your bank or favorite merchant in order to obtain sensitive information from you. Phone scammers employ a variety of approaches and tactics to trick unsuspecting victims into disclosing private information over the phone. If you want to learn how to recognize phone scams in the United Arab Emirates, be on the lookout for the following situations, which are frequent strategies used by fraudsters to deceive their victims:

  • Calls from an unknown number alerting you that you have won a cash award, acting as telecom providers, well-known stores, or other legal firms, are on the rise these days. These con artists will ask for your personal information, such as your credit card and bank account information. Fraudsters will use this information to steal money from the victim’s bank account after they have obtained it from the victim. Contact from scammers acting as bank officials who inform you that you need to update your bank statement via phone calls, SMS, or WhatsApp messaging In order to complete the transaction, they will ask for private information like as bank account data, PIN numbers and other information that banks will never require over the phone, and they will threaten targets that their ‘ATM card’ will be banned if they do not supply the information. Pretending to be police officers, scammers attempt to trick you into divulging verification codes and other personal information.

These are just a few of the scenarios that inhabitants of the United Arab Emirates may encounter while dealing with telephone fraudsters. Fraudsters are also sending messages to potential victims via WhatsApp or social media platforms. MyBayut explains some vital rules to always follow in order to prevent being a victim of these scam phone calls in order to keep yourself protected.

HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM SCAMMERS

If you receive an unusual request from a recognized number, contact the number back to ensure that the message or call was not a spoofing attempt before proceeding.

  • Under no circumstances should you give out personal information over the phone or by electronic means such as PIN numbers, credit/debit card data, bank account or passport details. Always use caution while answering calls from unfamiliar or odd numbers. Do not return a call from a questionable number since you will be charged for the call immediately
  • Don’t give out any personal information if you receive a call from an unknown number telling you of a cash award and claiming to be calling on behalf of your telecom provider or a company you often shop at. Instead, contact the supplier or store back on a phone number you know and trust to confirm the origins of the call
  • Or Following a call from a questionable number, it is recommended that you block the number and report the call to authorities by one of the ways listed above. As well as spoofing, fraudsters utilize a technique known as phishing, in which scammers seem to be communicating with a reputable source in order to trick their victims into divulging personal information. In other words, fraudsters can connect with you over the phone or over email while pretending to be a family member or friend. As a result, if you receive an unusual request from a recognized phone number or email address, do not instantly answer. Instead, get in touch with them to double-check that the request is legitimate.

In addition to taking precautions to report phone scams in the UAE, here are some suggestions to follow in order to keep yourself safe from scammers. Here is the conclusion of our tutorial on how to report scam numbers in the UAE as well as how to defend yourself from spoofing and email phishing attempts. Thank you for reading. Apart from being aware of where to report bogus calls in the UAE, it’s also a good idea to be familiar with the emergency numbers for a variety of scenarios. See all of the emergency numbers in Dubai that you should be familiar with, from dialing for ambulance services to notifying fire departments of an impending fire.

You can read more about it here.

Keep up with the MyBayut blog to keep informed about life in the United Arab Emirates!

How to Report Phone Call Scams in Dubai

Posted on April 7, 2021|Revised on September 9, 2021|Commentary

A guide to reporting phone call scams in Dubai for UAE expats.

Fraudsters target UAE citizens for their hard-earned money and goods, just as they do in any big metropolis throughout the world. Dubai is no exception. While scams might vary, phone call scams tend to be one of the most popular fraud schemes in Dubai, despite the fact that they can vary. AS WELL AS A LIST OF THE MOST POPULAR SCAMS IN DUBAI AND INFORMATION ON HOW TO AVOID THEM If you are unfortunate enough to become a victim of one, the greatest thing you can do to begin the process of recovery and self-protection is to report it to the Dubai Police Department immediately.

How to report phone call scams in Dubai

Despite the fact that fraudsters may be found throughout the country, local authorities respond quickly when it comes to ensuring the protection and security of UAE citizens and residents.

So, how can you report a scam call to the Dubai Police Department? Here’s where you can go about it.

By dialing the toll-free centre

If you have received a scam call and were able to terminate it before they were able to fool you, you may report the phone number to the toll-free call center at 901 to have it blocked. When you call, you will be prompted to select which department you would like to speak with. You should select option 3 in order to be linked to the Department of Criminal Investigation (CID). If you require assistance, you can select option 0 to speak with a customer support person. Then you may explain what happened and submit the scammer’s phone number to Dubai Police, who will investigate.

Through the c-Crime portal

If you believe you have been a victim of a phone call scam in Dubai, in the sense that a scammer has gotten sensitive information (e.g. bank details, money, etc.), you may report the crime using theDubai Police e-Crime site, which can be accessed by clicking on the following link. The e-Crime portal operated by the Dubai Police Department is also used to report various sorts of cybercrime in the emirate, such as social media, emails, hacking, and blackmailing.

How to identify phone call scammers in Dubai

If you believe you have been a victim of a phone call scam in Dubai, in the sense that a scammer has gotten sensitive information (e.g. bank details, money, etc.), you may report the crime using theDubai Police e-Crime site, which can be accessed by clicking on the link above. Aside from reporting social media crimes, emails, hacking, and blackmail, the e-Crime portal operated by the Dubai Police is also used to report various sorts of cybercrime in the emirate.

  • Scammers phoning to tell you that you have won the lotto are a common occurrence. Contrary to popular belief, winners are rarely told in this manner. The police, banks, telecom providers, restaurants and merchants have all received calls from unknown individuals claiming to be representatives from reputable agencies or businesses. The information you provide will be considered secret
  • For example, your ATM card number, bank account data, PIN numbers, and so on. If you don’t answer their queries and reveal your personal information, callers from unknown numbers will threaten to jail you or ban your accounts, according to the law. Scammers posing as representatives from the government, banks, or hospitals/clinics will urge you to “confirm” your personal information, stating that they need to “check/update” their records in order to “confirm” your information. They may request information such as your passport information, Emirates ID number, and so on. They will never contact you at random and ask for your information in this manner
  • Scammers pretending to be bank personnel that want your sensitive bank information in order for you to receive your monthly salary
  • SMS or WhatsApp messages from unknown numbers purporting to be from telecom companies, banks, the police, or so-called “WhatsApp workers” are on the increase.
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If something appears to be too good to be true, it almost certainly is. Banks, hospitals, authorities, and other organizations will never phone you to ask for private information such as your bank account number, PIN number, Emirates ID, or other personal information.

How to report scam calls in other parts of the UAE

You may also report phone call fraudsters in the United Arab Emirates if you are staying in one of the other emirates.

Abu Dhabi

In order to report a scam caller in Abu Dhabi, you must go via the Aman Service, which is operated by the Abu Dhabi Police Department. An important goal of the Aman Service is to improve the safety and security of UAE nationals and residents in Abu Dhabi. Contact them via phone at 800-2626, text message at 2828, or email at [email protected] to get started.

Ajman and Sharjah

For anyone in Sharjah or Ajman who wish to report a scam caller, dial 901 and choose the appropriate department to be connected with from the menu options.

  • Phishing scams in Dubai include phone calls, dubai police, phone scams, and scams in Dubai.

Recommended for you

The United Arab Emirates’ fraudsters employ a range of strategies to entice unsuspecting victims over the phone, coerce them into sharing personal information, and defraud them of their money. Despite the fact that fraudsters may be found throughout the country, local authorities respond quickly when it comes to ensuring the protection and security of UAE citizens and residents.

Taking the bait

To obtain sensitive and confidential information from you, phone fraudsters would frequently claim to be phoning from your telecom provider (such as du or Etisalat) or your bank in order to obtain your personal information. Furthermore, anonymous callers will pretend as representatives from respectable agencies, such as the police, and demand sensitive information, stating they need the information to update their records. The defendants in a recent case heard by the Dubai Courts have been accused of illegally acquiring money from victims after establishing a location in the Al Muraqabbat neighborhood from which to make phone calls to the victims.

Records revealed that the Pakistani defendants used to send WhatsApp messages or make phone calls to their potential victims from an apartment, where they had 14 mobile phones at their disposal. Finally, the defendants defrauded a woman out of Dh13,500 in their last scheme.

How it happened

In the middle of the night, she received a phone call from one of the defendants acting as a bank employee. He informed her that she needed to update her information in order to avoid her account being blocked. She provided him with her bank card details, after which she was told she would receive a one-time-password (OTP) on her phone from the con artist. She acknowledged receipt of the message and sent the phone number. After then, the guy reported that her account had been “successfully updated.” “Within five minutes, the bank alerted her that a withdrawal of Dh13,500 had been completed,” according to official records from an Emirati police officer.

The defendants’ mobile phones, which had dozens of SIM cards, were discovered by Dubai Police.

Dh45,000 lost in scam

One of Gulf News’ readers reported a similar incident to Dubai Police, in which scammers illegally obtained Dh45,000 from her bank account after convincing her to “update” her bank account by sending her a text message that appeared to be from Dubai Police using a program that looked like it was from the police department. These are some of the most prevalent scenarios that inhabitants of the United Arab Emirates may encounter while dealing with phone fraudsters. Fraudsters are also sending messages to potential victims via WhatsApp or social media platforms.

The majority of these numbers were obtained via the use of stolen or forged documents in order to avoid getting caught.

Raising awareness

The Dubai Police received a tip from one of Gulf News’ readers who had experienced a similar scam in which scammers had fraudulently taken Dh45,000 from her bank account after enticing her to “update” her bank account by sending her a text message that seemed to be from the Dubai Police. These are some of the most prevalent circumstances that inhabitants of the United Arab Emirates may encounter while dealing with phone fraudsters. Via WhatsApp or social media, fraudsters are also attempting to reach out to their intended victims.

In order to avoid being apprehended, the majority of these numbers were obtained through the use of stolen or forged papers.

Prison and fines

According to Article 33 of the Federal Law of the United Arab Emirates, fraud carries a maximum sentence of two years imprisonment and a fine of up to Dh20,000. The Dubai Police Department has reminded members of the community to exercise caution and to remember that banks will never ask for passcodes or personal information. A nationwide fraud awareness campaign is set to commence in 2020 in the United Arab Emirates, with the support of the UAE Banks Federation, the Central Bank, the Abu Dhabi Police Department, and the Dubai Police Department.

Consumers will be educated and protected against financial cybercrime and fraud as a result of the collaborative campaign, which is particularly important given the increasing usage of digital banking services during the epidemic.

Common tactics

Calls from unknown numbers threatening to jail you or restrict your accounts if you don’t answer their inquiries and reveal your personal information are becoming increasingly common. Scammers posing as representatives from the government, banks, or hospitals and clinics will urge you to validate your personal information, stating that they need to review or update their records as a result of your participation in the scam. In certain cases, unknown numbers will send SMS or WhatsApp messages claiming to be from telecom providers or the UAE Central Bank, and they will ask you to contact them through a cell phone number.

How to report a scam

In order to prevent money from being withdrawn from their bank accounts, officials have advised victims to contact their banks as soon as they feel a scam is taking place. They should then report the matter to Dubai Police, they said. Victims in Dubai can contact 901 to receive comprehensive advice and advise on what to do. Victims can report crimes at Smart Police Stations (SPS) located around the emirate, or they can file a complaint using the E-Crime portal. In order to file a case, the Dubai Police will require the victim to get a bank statement and any other evidence of the fraud (as well as to carry the Emirates ID).

How to Report Phone Scams in the UAE

The United Arab Emirates is a tough country, not only in terms of labor rules, but also in terms of all forms of scams and frauds. The government, in the same way that it supervises abusive employers and workers, does not allow those who attempt to defraud expats and residents in the nation of their investments. If you are currently employed in this country, you should be aware that you may always rely on the services of the government to identify and apprehend the fraudster who is defrauding you.

You will learn more about how to report phone scams in the United Arab Emirates after reading this post.

The majority of them are taken from the internet.

How and Where to Report Scammers in Dubai

As well as this, it is fairly typical to receive phone calls from complete strangers who tell you bizarre things about their own lives, their jobs, their companies, and so on. If this occurs, you should be aware that you have the option of reporting it to the appropriate authorities in the UAE, including the police. So, in the event that you are the victim of a phone scam while visiting the nation, here is what you need to know.

Call the Toll-Free Center number 901

If you have gotten a phone call from someone who is attempting to scam you, this is your first line of defense. The customer service representative will inquire as to the department you like to speak with.

The CID or the Criminal Investigation Department may be reached by pressing the “3” key, which takes you to the appropriate phone line. If you want to speak with a customer service professional, you can hit “0.” You will be able to interact with Dubai Police using this method.

Go to the e-Crime portal of Dubai Police

Another method of communicating with Dubai Police is through the e-Crime Portal, which is available online. This service is intended for foreigners and locals who have been victimized by phone scams and need assistance. You should immediately notify the authorities if you suspect that the caller has gotten sensitive information from your phone call. All other types of cybercrimes, such as social media scams, blackmail, emails, and other forms of communication, can be reported here.

How To Report Phone Scams in Abu Dhabi

If you are in Abu Dhabi and you receive a phone call from someone you do not know, and that person is attempting to obtain your personal and financial information, report it immediately to the Abu Dhabi Police’s Arman Service, which is available 24/7. The Arman Service was established by the police authorities in order to recall and collaborate with the general public in the community. These measures are intended to increase both the safety and security of citizens and visitors to the city. You may reach Arman Service by calling their toll-free number at 800-2626, sending them a text message at 2828, or sending them an email at [email protected]

How To Report Phone Scams in Sharjah and Ajman

In Sharjah and Ajman, you may report phone scammers by calling their local call centers, which can be reached by dialing 901. You will be provided a list of department alternatives with whom you can communicate. Just make sure you’re phoning the correct agency so that the investigation into your problem doesn’t get delayed.

How can you identify if a caller is a scam or not?

Before you call the authorities to report a phone scam, you should double-check that you have the correct ordinary thief on your hands. Not everyone who calls you is a dependable source of information. You must develop your own ways for determining whether or not the person who is phoning you is a scammer before you can proceed. So, here’s a step-by-step instruction.

  • When you receive a phone call from an unregistered number, it is most likely that you are being scammed by someone who claims that you have won money. This individual will notify you that he is a representative of a telecommunications provider, a reputable organization, or a well-known shop. He will inquire about your personal information, especially your banking and credit card information. If you have provided critical information, the fraudster will use that information to steal money from your bank. A scammer may also contact you, send text messages, or chat with you over WhatsApp, claiming to be a bank employee and informing you that you need to update your bank data. In order to get your credentials information, such as your bank account number, PIN numbers, and so on, this individual masquerading as a bank representative will ask for your personal information. Typically, a bank will not ask you for this information over the phone, for reasons that are currently unknown. So, if you find yourself in this situation, it is recommended that you contact your bank and have all of your credit cards blocked. When a fraudster pretends to be a police officer, he or she will get your personal information, such as pins and verification codes.

5 Ways to Avoid Phone Scammers in UAE

Avoiding fraudsters in the United Arab Emirates is simple if you know how to spot them. Following your knowledge of the most frequent sorts of scammers, here’s what you can do to protect yourself from being scammed by phone calls in the nation.

  1. Never give out your banking information to an unknown caller. This includes your PIN number, ATM code, mobile bank password, bank account, debit/credit card numbers, and other personal information, among other things. Always be on the lookout for phone calls from numbers that aren’t registered with your phone company. Avoid returning calls after the initial contact, as doing so may be considered a part of the game. If you receive a phone call informing you that you have won a financial award, do not provide any personal information. Make sure you don’t say anything that the phone caller may use against you. Block the unregistered number as soon as possible
  2. Do not give in to callers who are well-versed in the art of communication. Nowadays, scammers are extremely well-trained. When they approach you, they will attempt to convince you in order for you to provide your personal and sensitive information.

There are a variety of strategies you may use to keep yourself safe from frauds. You may devise your own tactics to prevent them, and you can also take into consideration the information provided in this article. Don’t forget to pass this information along to your relatives who live in the UAE and who may be in need of it.

Here’s How You Report a Financial Crime in the UAE [Guide]

It has opened the door for new methods of financial crime as the globe moves toward a more digitally based future. Our team has put together a list of all the choices available to you based on how and where the financial fraud occurred in order to counteract it. Due to the fact that the UAE is a financial hub, a number of regulatory bodies have been established to combat financial crime and safeguard investors as well as the general population.

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1) Central Bank

As a victim of financial crime, the first place you should go to in order to report the wrongdoings is the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates (CBUA).

It is responsible for overseeing the regulation of banks and other financial institutions across the country, with the exception of the DIFC. You may file a complaint online, or you can phone 800 CBUAE – 800 to file a complaint (22823).

2) Securities and Commodities Authority

The Securities and Commodities Authority (SCA) regulates all securities and commodities in the UAE, with the exception of those in the Dubai International Financial Center (DIFC). This is one of the reasons why seeking their assistance in this matter may be really advantageous. For more information on how to file a complaint, please visit their website or contact 1-800-SCAUAE (722823).

3) Dubai Financial Services Authority

A financial and ancillary services regulator, the Dubai Financial Services Authority (DFSA) oversees financial and auxiliary services performed in or from the DIFC. As you can see, this is the only entity that has the authority to undertake an inquiry when the DIFC is involved, as opposed to the other agencies stated above. You can file a complaint with the DFSA at this link: dfsa.ae/consumer/consumer complaints.

4) The Supreme Audit Institution

The Supreme Audit Institution (SAI) is the highest audit authority in the United Arab Emirates and is an autonomous organization. Furthermore, the SAI is a member of the Federal National Council, as is the SAI. The SAI not only audits federal government enterprises, but it also has a responsibility to combat fraud and corruption in the government. Please visit or phone 02-635-9999 if you like to file a formal complaint with them.

5) eCrime Website

One of the only requirements for filing a complaint on this portal is that the crime took place within the geographical scope of Dubai city itself. The complaint can be lodged at the following address:

6) Dubai Police

Occasionally, if you have been wronged, the good old-fashioned police work can also be of use. For further enquiries into the situation, you may phone 901 and ask to be connected to the appropriate authorities. You can also contact Dubai police using their app, which is called Dubai Police, or you can dial their main number, which is 901. Financial crimes can also be reported to the local police station, if one is available.

7) Abu Dhabi Police

The Abu Dhabi police may be reached through their call center at 800-3333, or you can send an email to [email protected] with your questions and concerns.

8) Sharjah Police

Financial offences can be reported at the same address as the other two police departments stated above. Alternatively, you can visit the local police station.

UAE: Police warn of phone scammers’ latest tricks

Published at 12:27 p.m. on Thursday, October 7, 2021 Using a new technique, phone fraudsters have been informing locals that they are among those who have been recognized by authorities for their participation in the recently finished National Sterilisation Programme, according to government officials. Residents of Abu Dhabi are being cautioned not to reply to questionable phone calls, messages, or emails, according to the police. These phone calls or text messages are often from fraudsters who are attempting to get residents’ bank account or credit card information in order to steal their money.

  • These con artists may even claim that the person’s ATM card has been banned or that their personal information has to be updated with the bank.
  • Residents should not divulge any private information to anybody, including their online banking passwords, ATM PINs, security number (CCV), or passwords,” says the department.
  • People have also been instructed to phone the Aman Service hotline, 8002626, in order to alert authorities about the perpetrators or the scam.
  • ALSO READ:UAE: An Emirati loses his whole life wealth in a seven-minute scam phone conversation.
  • A new center dedicated to communicating with banks and accepting financial fraud reports was established by the Abu Dhabi Police in July as the authorities ramped up their efforts to combat financial crime.

The goal is to increase the speed with which cases involving financial crimes are investigated and fraudsters are apprehended and prosecuted.

How to Report Scams & Fake Items Using “Dubai Consumer” App

Have you ever been duped into participating in a bogus contest? Have you ever unknowingly purchased a counterfeit item or an outdated product from a grocery store? Have you unintentionally forfeited your hard-earned money? According to Gulf News, you may report such incidents immediately using theDubai Consumer smartphone application. ALSO READ: “Rental Good Conduct (RGC) Certificate” Service Allows You to Check the Rental Cases of Landlords and Tenants The Commercial Compliance and Consumer Protection (CCCP)sector of the Department of Economic Development (DED) in Dubai developed the Dubai Consumer app.

DED Launches Dubai Consumer Mobile App

In a recent announcement, the DED-CCCCP cautioned firms and entrepreneurs against participating in “misleading” offers and competitions, which are typically promoted on social media. In addition, they recommended customers to double-check such events and contests by calling the Department of Economic Development. A word of warning was also issued about “projects” that request money from members in exchange for promises of enormous financial returns. In issuing these warnings, the Federal Trade Commission tries to safeguard company owners, entrepreneurs, and consumers from commercial fraud—particularly against individuals who are engaging in unethical, unauthorized, and questionable activities.

How to Make Use of the Dubai Consumer Application An overview of how to use the Dubai Consumer app is provided below.

  1. Download ” Dubai Consumer ” from the Google Play Store or the Apple App Store. Fill out the form with your name, mobile number, email address, and other information. File your report/complaint and wait for the Department of Environmental Defense to respond

It is important to note that the app offers the ability to file a Consumer Complaint, a Business complaint, as well as a Complaint Tracking. Credit for the image goes to Dubai Consumer on Google Play (screenshots) It is not necessary to wait an excessive amount of time or exert excessive effort while making a complaint using the Dubai Consumer app. Simply fill out the required information and submit your report! Meanwhile, if you’re searching for a health-related app, have a look at the Dubai Municipality’s “Food Watch” app, which is designed for health-conscious consumers.

Hit by bank fraud in the UAE? Here’s what to do next

Given that we now spend more time online than ever before on an increasing number of platforms, fraudsters have devised innovative techniques to deceive us into parting with our money. If you are a resident of the United Arab Emirates and you have been a victim of bank fraud, read this page. All of the emails about princely inheritances and international organizations giving people gifts are now a thing of the past. New scams being reported in the United Arab Emirates take on a variety of shapes and sizes.

Alternatively, they may seek sensitive identification information from you or proclaim you the winner of one of the numerous raffles held by UAE-based charitable and non-profit organizations.

Another type of fraud is sending SMS or WhatsApp messages to locals, in which scammers claim to be alerting them about blocked bank accounts or other similar situations.

They may even include bank logos or links to websites that appear to be official in nature.

You will find a lot of valuable advice in this section to help you avoid falling victim to financial fraud.

What to do if you’re a victim of bank fraud

  • Nonetheless, due to the widespread nature and rising frequency of bank fraud in the United Arab Emirates, anyone might become a victim at any point in time. As a result, in recognition of its status as a financial center, the United Arab Emirates has put in place a number of safeguards to protect bank account holders and investors. The next five stages will walk you through how to respond to bank fraud. In rare instances, you may even be able to recover any money that has been taken from you. Notify your financial institution: Whether you have sent money to a fraudster, divulged private personal information, or discovered a questionable activity on your account statement, contact your financial institution immediately to report the incident. In the United Arab Emirates, there is normally a time restriction on reporting fraud, however this might vary from bank to bank. Officials at your bank will be able to advise you on any additional actions that may be required. For example, you can be asked to ban your payment cards and request new ones, or you might be asked to fill out documents or escalate the situation further to law enforcement authorities
  • Change the passwords to your financial institutions. If hackers or fraudsters have obtained access to your account information, they may attempt to defraud you once again. As a result, it’s a good idea to update your access information across all platforms – including desktop, mobile, soft token passwords, and any telephone identifying numbers – to prevent identity theft. Make sure to select a strong password that is at least eight characters in length and includes a combination of tiny and large letters as well as numbers and special symbols in a random order. Use of birthdays or other special dates as number codes should be avoided since they are simple to guess if hackers have even a limited amount of access to your personal information. Fill out the form for a transaction dispute. The majority of banks will want you to provide an explanation in a certain manner. You may be required to submit a signed transaction dispute form that outlines the fraud in detail within a few days after receiving the request. Before doing so, however, consult with a bank representative – either over the phone or in person at a service center – to determine whether any further documentation is necessary. Inquire about the length of time the procedure will take – depending on the severity of the fraud, it might take up to 90 working days or more. Make a formal police report. If the crime is serious or if there is a considerable amount of money involved, your bank may require you to file a police complaint with the authorities. In Dubai, you may do so using the Dubai Police mobile application. You may also file a complaint with ecrime.ae if you live in the city of Dubai. As an alternative, you can contact the local police hotline or go to the nearest police station that specializes in financial fraud to report the crime (this may be limited to a certain posts locations). Provide the authorities with as many facts as you can, including the location, time, and manner in which the incident happened. Aside from receipts, confirmation emails, and text messages linked to the fraudulent transaction, the police will also ask for records that would aid their investigation, such as bank statements. Bring the situation to the attention of the Central Bank. If the problem has not been rectified to your satisfaction, you can file a complaint with the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates, which is in charge of overseeing all banking activities throughout the country. In order to make a complaint, you may either phone the 800 CBUAE (800 22823) hotline or log on to the website. There is further information on dealing with bank fraud on the bank’s website
  • However, it is not mandatory. As fraudsters employ more complex methods to defraud unwary UAE citizens, it is critical to be knowledgeable about the many types of fraud that may occur in the nation and to understand what you can do if you become a victim of one of these schemes. Inform your friends and relatives about this post so that they may help raise awareness about bank fraud in the United Arab Emirates.

Dubai Police issue alert over phone and online fraud

Cold callers and internet fraudsters continue to represent a threat to the public, according to the authorities, who have issued a fresh warning to the public. Dubai Police turned to Twitter to raise awareness of the dangers posed by con artists and to provide advice on how to avoid being duped out of money. People should be on high alert if they are requested to reveal personal information, particularly over the phone or over messaging platforms such as WhatsApp, according to the police. “Government employees, including Dubai Police, will not ask you for your personal information,” the police department stated in a statement.

A public service announcement cautioned the audience that if an offer appears to be too good to be true, it almost certainly is.

Resident inundated with cold calls

Janine Nael, a Jordanian who moved to the United Arab Emirates in September to take up employment, got hundreds of strange WhatsApp messages and phone calls shortly after arrival. The 24-year-old public relations executive said that she had been warned about such scams by family members and acquaintances who had lived in the nation for several years. “The first phone call I received was in October of last year. According to her, the caller purported to be from the central bank and informed her that her bank account had been compromised.” The fact that he called her from a mobile phone gave him away.

“I decided to give him a hard time,” she added.

The seller received a phone call from a prospective buyer who provided him a link that asked him to give his bank information in order to receive the money transfer from the buyer.

Residents who believe their personal information has been taken are encouraged to register a report through the force’s app, itseCrimes.aewebsite, by phoning 901, or by visiting the local smart police station, according to Dubai Police.

Cost of cyber crime

Website for comparing technologies in the United Kingdom According to Comparitech, cybercrime costs the UAE $746 million every year. According to the report, the UAE documented 166,667 victims of cybercrime between 2018 and 2020, based on information acquired during those years. A rise in cybercrime has been observed worldwide as a result of the Covid-19 epidemic, which necessitated remote working and rapid digital change. Last year, cybersecurity specialists reported a significant increase in the number of frauds involving phony delivery and WhatsApp conversations, according to the experts.

Using WhatsApp, criminals have also contacted individuals, assuring them that they have won a prize and that they must transfer cash to cover delivery fees.

Dubai Police arrest 145 foreign suspects in 2021:in pictures

During a raid on Raffaele Imperiale’s residence in Dubai, authorities conducted an interview with him. All photographs courtesy of the Dubai Police. Updated at 9:33 a.m. on January 10th, 2022.

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Fraud and Scams

Visitors and users of the Central Bank of the UAE website are subject to the terms and conditions set out above (the ” Website “).

1- Access to Website

User agrees that they will not, and will not attempt to, violate the relevant procedures and regulations for protecting the Website, which may include but is not limited to the following:

  1. This includes accessing information that was not meant to be made available to this user, as well as entering into a server or account that the user was not allowed to access. The use of any virus on the Website, increasing load on it, immersing it, sending commercial messages to it, or avalanching it with electrified messages without the permission of the Central Bank of The UAE is prohibited. Attempting to conduct any test or survey for the purpose of identifying weaknesses in the Central Bank of The UAE’s systems or networks, or violating applicable procedures or documenting them is prohibited without the permission of the Central Bank of The UAE. Sending unsolicited electronic messages to the Website, such as commercials and/or advertisements for services or products, falsifying and dispatch control protocol package address/internet protocol or any part of the address details in any electronic messages, or sending news messages are all examples of spamming the Website. Making any untrue news or information public and ascribing it to Central Bank of the UAE in an unlawful manner
  2. Using the Website by any means for sending an e-mail, anything of it or on its behalf, by referring to it or assuming the identity of its name involving offence or libel of Central Bank of the UAE, Website or any person whomsoever

1.2 Users who violate or breach the terms and conditions of use, or where there are reasonable grounds to think that they have violated or broken the terms and conditions of use, may be stopped and/or barred from accessing the Website. Civil and criminal penalties will be imposed on those who violate the rules of usage, system, or network. 1.3 When such infractions are discovered, they will be investigated, and the individuals responsible for the offenses will be punished.

2- Intellectual Property

2.1 These Intellectual Property provisions are incorporated into the general Terms and Conditions of the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates website. A copyright and all other intellectual property rights in all of the information on this Website (including text, graphics, pictures, files, hyperlinks, and sound) belong to the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates unless otherwise specified. It is permissible for you to download or print information and content from this Website for your own personal use, for use within an organization, or for non-commercial purposes.

In any commercial or public announcement, or in any form of document or record, or communication (whether verbal, written, electronic, or otherwise), you must get prior written approval from the Central Bank of the UAE before using the name or logo of that institution.

Any illegal use, replication, or printing of this information, materials, or intellectual property rights is strictly forbidden.

3- Disclaimer

It is expressly agreed that the Central Bank of the UAE will not be liable for any loss or damage arising from use of, or inability to access, this Website.

4- Links

4.1 Links to other websites have been included on this Website in order to better serve the needs of users. For any content given on these websites, any inappropriate use of these websites by any person, their correct function, or for any difficulties that may arise as a result of the use of these websites, the Central Bank of the UAE assumes no responsibility. 4.2 It is authorized to establish a direct link to any and all of the pages housed on this Website.

Uploading any pages within different frameworks on another website, on the other hand, is not authorized. Pages from this website will be submitted either within the user’s current window or as a new window for the user.

5- Privacy

5.1 This privacy statement is incorporated into the Central Bank of the United Arab Emirates website’s general Terms and Conditions. 5.2 When you use the Website, the Website title will not collect any personal information about you unless you directly and voluntarily choose to supply such information to us, in which case we will collect the information. You understand that we will only use the information you provide to handle your request for information or services if you choose to do so. A thorough and stringent information security policy will be followed by those in charge of this Website and its associated systems.

Central Bank of The UAE may take appropriate measures to safeguard the Website against any loss, misuse, or alteration of information made available through it; in such a case, Central Bank shall not be liable for any damage caused to a website user or to any other person as a result of a user’s or another person’s disclosure of confidential information shared through a website.

6- General Provisions

In addition to the Central Bank of the UAE website’s normal Terms and Conditions, this privacy policy is incorporated into them. In order for us to offer you with a better experience on the Website, we will not gather any personal information about you unless you directly and voluntarily disclose it to us. If you choose to do so, we will only use the information you provide to fulfill your request for information or services from us in the future. A thorough and stringent information security policy will be followed by this Website and those in charge of it.

Central Bank of The UAE may take appropriate measures to safeguard the Website against any loss, misuse, or alteration of information made available through it; in such a case, Central Bank shall not be liable for any damage caused to a website user or to any other person as a result of a user’s or another person’s disclosure of confidential information made available through the Website.

Scams

Please keep in mind that the Department of State takes no responsibility or liability for the professional competency or reputation of, or the quality of services offered by, any of the businesses or persons whose names appear on the lists below. The inclusion of a company or organization on this list does not imply endorsement by the Department or the United States government. The names are presented alphabetically, and the order in which they occur has no further relevance beyond that of the alphabetical listing.

The information on the list has been given directly by the local service providers, and the Department is not in a position to vouch for the accuracy of the information provided.

Internet Financial Scams

Every day, we receive enquiries from people who have been cheated out of hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars by Internet acquaintances who they mistook for friends or family members and ended up losing hundreds or thousands of dollars. Internet scams are attempts by con artists to get you to transfer them money using the internet. In Nigeria, these schemes are referred known as 419 scams, which stands for four hundred and ninety nine dollars. Scam materials may be found by clicking here. The most prevalent scams include a person claiming to be in Nigeria who is in some form of problem, which can range from jail to extortion to hospitalization and everything in between.

  • If this is someone you have never met in person, we strongly advise you to discontinue all communication with the sender of the message and to refrain from sending any money to Nigeria.
  • Do not take any proposals that require payment of a fee up ahead into consideration.
  • In many cases, fraudsters scour the Internet for potential victims and then spend weeks or months cultivating a connection with the victim.
  • When it comes to scammers, they may be quite cunning and manipulative, concocting tragic and realistic scenarios that would compel you to pay them money.
  • You may only know your friend or fiancé through social media and have never met in person
  • The scammer appears to be a very attractive person in the photographs, which appear to have been taken at a professional modeling agency or photography studio. It is always possible to contact the U.S. embassy in the country where a person’s passport or visa was issued to check on their validity if they provide you with a copy of their document. The scammer’s luck is extremely bad – he or she has been involved in a car accident, has been arrested, has been mugged, has been beaten, or has been hospitalized. In some cases, close family members have died or are unable to assist. Occasionally, the scammer will claim to have a young child who is ill or hospitalized in another country. However, despite your efforts, they are unable to travel due to detention by immigration officials or other factors that prevent them from traveling
  • You have sent money to cover the cost of visas and plane tickets. Caution should be exercised when dealing with anyone who requests funds for a BTA, or Basic Travel Allowance, as a condition of leaving another country for the United States. A BTA does not exist in the traditional sense. Others will claim that they require a travel allowance, or travel money, in order to be able to travel to the United States with their family. There is no such requirement under United States law
  • The scammer claims to have been born and raised in the United States, but his or her grammar and spelling are poor, indicating that he or she is not a native English speaker
  • The scammer may claim to be in Nigeria, but he or she may request that the money be transferred to an account in another country. If the scammer is in a third country but requests that funds be sent to Nigeria, the scammer may even claim to be contacting you from the United States Embassy, where your partner, business associate, or friend is being held pending the payment of a fee. People are not detained at U.S. embassies

There is a possibility that you only know your friend or fiancé through social media and have never met in person. The fraudster appears to be a very gorgeous individual in the photographs, which look to have been taken at a professional modeling agency or photographic studio. Alternatively, if they supply you with a copy of their passport or visa, you may always call the U.S. embassy in the nation where the passport or visa was issued to confirm the validity of the document. The scammer’s fortunes have been really terrible — he or she has been involved in a vehicle accident, arrested, mugged, assaulted, or admitted to the hospital.

It’s possible that the fraudster will pretend to be the parent of an abroad little child who is sick or in the hospital.

A BTA does not exist in the real world.

There is no such requirement under United States law; the scammer claims to have been born and raised in the United States, but his or her grammar and spelling are poor, indicating that he or she is not a native English speaker; the scammer claims to be in Nigeria, but he or she may request that the money be transferred to an account in another country.

Embassy, where your partner, business associate, or friend is being held pending payment of some form of charge. People are not detained in U.S. embassies.

  1. You only know your buddy or fiancé on social media and have never met in person
  2. The fraudster appears to be a very gorgeous individual in the photographs, which look to have been shot at a professional modeling agency or picture studio. It is always possible to call the U.S. embassy in the nation where a person’s passport or visa was issued to check on its validity provided they supply you with a copy of their document. The scammer’s fortunes have been really terrible — he or she has been involved in a vehicle accident, jailed, mugged, assaulted, or hospitalized. Close family members have died or are unable to provide assistance. Sometimes the fraudster pretends to have a little child who is unwell or hospitalized in a foreign country. You have paid money to them for visas or airline tickets, but they are unable to fly to their destinations due to imprisonment by immigration officials or other factors that prohibit them from traveling
  3. Precaution should be used when dealing with someone who asks monies for a BTA, or Basic Travel Allowance, as a condition of leaving another nation for the United States. There is no such thing as a BTA in the real world. Others will argue that they require a trip allowance, or travel money, in order to be able to go to the United States. Again, there is no such requirement under U.S. law
  4. The scammer claims to have been born and raised in the United States, but his or her grammar and spelling are poor, indicating that he or she is not a native English speaker
  5. The scammer may claim to be in Nigeria, but he or she may request that the money be transferred to an account in another country. Instead, the scammer may pretend to be in a third nation but request that payments be transferred to Nigeria
  6. The fraudster may even claim to be contacting you from a U.S. Embassy where your partner, business associate, or friend is being held pending payment of a charge. The United States’ embassies do not detain anyone.

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