How To Say Thank You In Dubai? (Solved)

One of the first words most tourists pick up when in Dubai is shukran (thank you).

  • Welcome (for thank you): Afwan How are you? Kaifa Alhal I’m fine, thanks: Ana Bekhair, Shokran And you? Wa ant? Thank you (very much!):

How do you say thank you in UAE?

Shukran (pronounced shook-ran) If you want to say ‘Thank you’ or ‘Thanks’ in Arabic, Shukran is the word you want to use. And should you want to say ‘No, thanks. ‘ in Arabic, say ‘La, shukran’.

How do you reply to thank you in Arabic?

In Gulf countries, the most common way to respond to ‘thank you’ in Arabic is to say: يا هلا (Ya Halah), which is equal to “you’re welcome”. It is actually the same expression you can use to -literally- welcome someone.

How do you greet in UAE?

15 Arabic phrases to help you get by in the UAE

  1. Hi: Salam.
  2. Good Morning: Sabah El Kheer.
  3. Good Evening: Masaa El Kheer.
  4. Welcome (to greet someone): Marhaba.
  5. Welcome (for thank you): Afwan.
  6. How are you? Kaifa Alhal.
  7. I’m fine, thanks: Ana Bekhair, Shokran.
  8. And you? Wa ant?

What is the response to Shukran?

Explanation: “shukran” = thank you. ” afwan” = not at all or you are welcome. Please note that “afwan” is the reply for “shukran.”

What is Salamat in Islam?

Salamat is the word for “thank you” in many Filipino languages, including Tagalog, Cebuano, Bikol, Hiligaynon, and Waray. In the Arabic form, the word is in the feminine plural salāmat سلامت from the singular salāmah. Salamat in Arabic is equivalent to peace and blessings (a greeting or plural greeting).

How do you say thank you respectfully?

General Thank-You Phrases

  1. Thank you so much.
  2. Thank you very much.
  3. I appreciate your consideration/guidance/help/time.
  4. I sincerely appreciate ….
  5. My sincere appreciation/gratitude/thanks.
  6. My thanks and appreciation.
  7. Please accept my deepest thanks.

Can I say Habibi to a girl?

Habibi (male) and habibti (female) Both mean darling, and can be used with friends and good colleagues.

How do you say JazakAllah in Arabic?

JazakAllah (Arabic: جَزَاكَ ٱللَّٰهُ, jazāka -llāh) or Jazāk Allāhu Khayran (جَزَاكَ ٱللَّٰهُ خَيْرًا, jazāka -llāhu khayran) is a term used as an Islamic expression of gratitude meaning “May Allah reward you [with] goodness.” The phrase JazakAllah itself is incomplete.

How do you express your gratitude?

8 Creative Ways to Express Gratitude

  1. 1 Show a little enthusiasm.
  2. 2 Vary your vocabulary.
  3. 3 Get specific.
  4. 4 Make it public.
  5. 5 Share a list of your favorite things about them.
  6. 6 Write them a handwritten letter.
  7. 7 Give them extra encouragement.
  8. 8 Get deep.

How do you thank someone?

Personal thank you

  1. I appreciate you!
  2. You are the best.
  3. I appreciate your help so much.
  4. I’m grateful to you.
  5. I wanted to thank you for your help.
  6. I value the help you’ve given me.
  7. I am so thankful for you in my life.
  8. Thanks for the support.

How do you respond to Habibi?

How to respond to Shukran Habibi – Quora. If it’s someone close you can reply “ Afwan Habibi” as “Habibi” is a term of endearment. Afwan= your welcome! Mo-mosh-kila= no problem!

What is the meaning of Marhaba?

Marhaba is Muslim name which means – Greeting; Welcome.

What is the meaning of Shukran Habibi?

What does Shukran Habibi mean? ‘Shukrn Habibi’, in Arabic ‘شكرا حبيبي’, means “ thanks, my love ”. However, Habibi / habibti are the most common expressions.

Useful Phrases to Learn Before Visiting Dubai

The Museum of the Future in Dubai|Giuseppe Cacace / Getty ImagesThe Museum of the Future in Dubai Arabic and English are the two most widely spoken languages in the United Arab Emirates. Despite the fact that you may get by with only speaking English, there are a number of Arabic phrases that you may come across in everyday speech. Here are the most important terms to know before visiting Dubai on vacation. To begin a conversation in Arabic, the formal greeting is as-salam alaykum, to which the answer is invariably as-salam alaykum.

If, on the other hand, you like to say hello in a more casual manner, use the slang term forsalamorhalla, which means “hello.” In addition, there is a considerable probability that when you arrive in Dubai, you will be met with the pleasantmarhabaanor that you will be welcomed withahlan.

“I’m OK, thank you,” is the customary answer in Arabic, which translates as “I’m fine, thank you.” Asmae alsalama, which approximately translates as ‘go with peace,’ is a common way of saying farewell in Arabic.

It’s also useful to know the difference between ‘yes’ and ‘no,’ which isna’amandlrespectively.

  1. If you accidentally bump into someone, you should say ‘excuse me’ likealma’dera and’sorry’ likeaesef.
  2. Spices at the souq|Photo courtesy of Elroy Serrao/Flickr In the United Arab Emirates, Arabic expressions have been translated into various languages.
  3. It is a term of endearment that is used between close friends as well as between romantic partners.
  4. Traditionally, this phrase is intended to convey the sentiment that someone would try their best, but it is also used as an excuse.
  5. Photograph by Sam Valadi/Flickr Haram is a term that generally translates to a sin or anything that is prohibited and in violation of Islamic law.
  6. As a result, it is best to stop whatever you are doing if someone says this to you because it may be considered offensive or even illegal.
  7. A waiter may inquire as to whether you would like dessert after your meal if you are in a restaurant.
  8. This is something you could hear a parent say to their children when out and about in Dubai.Shu hadha?
  9. It can be used either as a harmless query or as a statement that roughly translates as ‘what on earth are you doing?!’ or something similar.
  10. Dubai at Night If you find yourself in a tricky circumstance where you need to speak in Arabic, the following phrases may be of assistance to you.

To inquire, ‘Can you assist me?’ sayhal beemkanik musaea’adati, or simply saymusaeada, which means ‘assistance.’ If someone is trying to speak with you in Arabic, you may tell them that you don’t comprehend what they’re saying by sayingla afham (I don’t understand).

5 ways to say “thank you” in Arabic

time required for reading: 2 minutes Hello, Ahlan(, hello)! Our blog published an article last week that discussed five different methods to express “thank you” in Spanish. This week, let’s take a look at 5 different ways to express gratitude in the Arabic language. Though the MENA region has its own colloquial dialect, ‘aammiya(), which can be understood almost anywhere in the region, here are 5 ways to say “thank you” that can be understood almost anywhere in the region. Shukran is extensively used in all Arabic-speaking nations, in both official and casual situations, and is readily understood by speakers of all dialects of Arabic, regardless of where they are from.

2. Tislam/Tislami (تسلم/تسلمي)

This term, which may be heard largely in the Levant and portions of the Gulf, is derived from the root verbsalama(), which means “to come out safe/healthy” in Arabic. It can be used when a friend or family member offers you something or goes out of their way to help you out in some way. Addideyk(to a male)or ideyki(to a female) to the end of the statement and you will literally be saying “may your hands enjoy health” – a means of expressing gratitude to the person who has given you something in exchange for something else.

3. Mamnoun(t)ak/ek (ممنونك/ممنونتك)

In the Levant and portions of the Gulf, this term is derived from the root verbsalama(), which means “to come out safe/healthy.” It is mostly heard in Arabic. The phrase can be used when a friend or family member offers you something or goes out of their way to do something pleasant for you. Addideyk(to a male)or ideyki(to a female) to the end of the statement and you will literally be saying “may your hands enjoy health” – a means of expressing gratitude to the person who has given you something in exchange for something.

4.Ya‘tik al-‘afiya(يعطيك العافية)

This phrase, which literally translates as “may grant you health,” is used to express gratitude and admiration for someone’s hard work in a formal setting. When you respond, you may hear the phrase Allah y-a’fik, which literally translates as “may God bless you with good health.” As a greeting while visiting a store in the Levant, it is used to acknowledge and praise the fact that those who serve you are putting forth extra effort. Be cautious while using this word in Morocco since it implies fire in the Moroccan Darija dialect, therefore use caution when using this phrase in Morocco!

5. Yekather khairak/ek (يكثر خيرك)

This phrase, which is an abbreviated version of the saying “I wishincreases your welfare,” can be used to express gratitude to someone who has helped you in any way throughout the Arab world. Khair() is a noun that means “excellent,” and it is frequently heard asbekhair(, well) in response to the query “How are you?” Here are some examples of how to express gratitude in Arabic. The Arabic language and culture are rich with nuance, and NaTakallam’s language partners can help you learn more about them this holiday season.

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Arabic words and phrases

With expats outnumbering natives in the United Arab Emirates and accounting for 85 percent of the workforce in Dubai, it’s no surprise that you may go for days without hearing any native Arabic being spoken. Even the expat people and families who have lived in the country for years or decades are unable to follow a discussion because of a lack of Arabic language proficiency. When pressed on the subject, they declare that they never felt the need to study Arabic in the first place. Even third-culture children and expat children who were born and educated in the United Arab Emirates do not speak Arabic fluently.

Even yet, most expats in the Middle East acquire a few popular terms and phrases that they might employ in their everyday conversations from time to time.

1. Khallas (pronounced ka-las)

Khallas is an Arabic word that means ‘completed.’ It can also mean stop, finish, or enough, among other things. It’s one of those terms that may and should be used in a variety of circumstances. As an illustration, Khallas! This is the last time I’ll say anything about it.

2. Maafi Mushki (pronounced mar-fi moosh-key-la)

Another term that is frequently used in Arabic. That phrase means ‘no problem’. People say it when you express gratitude to them, when you ask for a favor, or when you make a request. For example: Please accept my apologies for being late. Response: Maafi mushkil, maafi mushkil!

3. Habeebi/Habeebti (pronounced ha-bee-bee/ha-beeb-tee)

Habibi is an Arabic word that literally translates as’my love,’ and it is frequently used in conversation, both professionally and informally. You should learn it since it may be used in any context – whether you are truly calling someone your buddy, when you are fighting, or even when you are being sarcastically! To address a female, you would say ‘Habeebti’, which is short for ‘Habeebti’. The closest English word I’ve come across to describe Habeebi/habeebti is ‘buddy’ or’my dear’. As an illustration: Thank you, Habeebi!

4. Hala (pronounced ha-la)

Hala is regarded as an informal or slang way of expressing one’s greeting. You might think of it as the Spanish counterpart of the phrase “Holla!” for assistance in recalling this one. As an illustration, Hala! How are things going for you?

5. Assalam Alaikum (pronounced ass-a-lam al-eye-kum)

Assalam Alaikum is a polite greeting in Arabic that means “peace be upon you.” It literally translates as ‘Peace be upon you.’ Greetings and salutations in Arabic: Assalam Alaikum! How are you doing?

6. Walaikum Assalam (pronounced wal-eye-kum ass-a-lam)

Walaikum Assalam, which translates as ‘.and peace be upon you as well,’ is said in response to the greeting Assalam Alaikum.

As an illustration, Walaikum Assalam! Thank you for asking. I’m fine. How are you doing?

7. Insha’Allah (pronounced in-shar-ah-la)

Insha’Allah is one of those words that is heard frequently in conversations all over Dubai, regardless of whether the speaker is a local, an expat, an arabic or a non-arabic speaker. Insha’Allah is an Arabic phrase that meaning ‘God willing’ or ‘If God wills it’. Using the following example: “I’ll see you tomorrow, Insha’Allah.”

8. Masha’Allah (pronounced mash-ar-ah-la)

Because it is used in so many different contexts, it might be difficult to explain the meaning of Masha’Allah. The most accurate translation is ‘God has decreed it’ (God has decided). It’s most commonly used when someone or something is being admired or praised. As an illustration: Oh Masha’Allah! That’s fantastic!

9. Ahlan Wa Sahlan (pronounced ah-lan wa sar-lan)

When expats arrive in Dubai, they are likely to hear the phrase Ahlan Wa Sahlan for the first time. It is a greeting that is not the same as the greeting that is said in response to the word “thank you.” Typically, Ahlan Wa Sahlan is used as a stand-alone statement to express gratitude for someone’s presence in your house, party, or nation, among other situations.

10. Marhaba (pronounced mar-ha-ba)

In Arabic, there are a variety of terms that can be used to greet someone. Marhaba is one of these individuals. As an illustration: Marhaba! How are you doing?

11. Masalamah(pronounced mass-a-lar-ma)

In Arabic, the word masalamah means ‘goodbye.’ While there are various words that may be used to say farewell, this one is the most straightforward to understand. As an illustration, “See you later.” Masalamah!

12. Shukran (pronounced shook-ran)

In Arabic, the term Shukran means ‘thank you’ or ‘thanks,’ and it is the phrase you should use to express yourself. You can say ‘La, shukran’ in Arabic to express your displeasure with the situation. As an illustration, Shukran! That’s quite thoughtful of you. Example 2: I’m not interested in any la shukran.

13. Mabrook (pronounced ma-brook)

If you wish to express your heartfelt congrats to someone in Arabic, use the word ‘Mabrook’. As an illustration, Mabrook! I’m overjoyed for your success!

14. La afham (pronounce la af-am)

I don’t comprehend what la afham is saying. It’s also essential to know in case you come across someone who only speaks Arabic and find yourself having problems conversing with them. As an illustration, “Sorry, la afham.”

15. Min Fadlak (pronounced min fad-lak)

If you ever need to express your gratitude in Arabic, say Min fadlak. Keep in mind, however, that while speaking to a girl, the pronunciation will differ somewhat from the male. If you want to say please in Arabic to a female, use the phrase Min Fadlik.

How to use these words in your conversations

The words and phrases listed above are ones that convey their meaning even if they are not used in conjunction with a sentence. In such case, if you’re unclear of how to include them into your speech, pay attention to how other individuals use these terms into their sentences. It shouldn’t take long for you to figure out what context to employ them in. From souks and supermarkets to finding job or a place to live, this comprehensive destination guide covers all you need to know about living in the United Arab Emirates.

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18 Ways to Say Thank You in Arabic – Sound Like a Local

“Kind words are extremely valuable and cost very nothing.” When we are children, thank you is one of the first things we learn to say. In addition, while studying a foreign language, such as Arabic, thank you is likely to be one of the first words you learn. Arabs place a high value on thanking one another, and there are literally hundreds of beautiful and colorful methods to express gratitude. We’ve compiled a list of the most well-known methods to express gratitude in Arabic dialects that are widely spoken nowadays.

Thank you in Arabic at a Glance

“Kind words are extremely valuable and inexpensive.” One of the first things we learn as children is how to express gratitude. In addition, when learning a new language, such as Arabic, thank you is likely to be one of the first words you learn as well. Thanks are really important to Arabs, and there are SO many lovely and colorful methods to express gratitude to one another in their culture. All of the most well-known ways to express gratitude in popular Arabic dialects have been gathered together in one convenient place.

General Thank You in Arabic

Begin by learning how to express gratitude in spoken Arabic by saying “thank you.” The dialects and areas of spoken Arabic each have their own distinct taste, therefore they will often have varied methods of saying thank you. As you shall see, there are several terms that are used across the Arab world. Follow this link to learn the 10 best ways to say hello in Arabic, as well as how to respond

Shukran شكراً

If you have spent even a small amount of time learning Arabic, it is likely that you are already familiar with the word Shukran. Shukranis unquestionably the most prevalent form of expressing gratitude in Arabic. However, even though it is Modern Standard Arabic in terms of grammar, we have included it in the spoken Arabic section since it is used often in informal and conversational contexts. Being familiar with this expression is beneficial because it is used and recognized throughout all Arab-speaking nations.

See also:  Where Abouts Is Dubai? (TOP 5 Tips)

Make certain you understand how to reply — In Arabic, there are seven simple ways to say “Thank you.”

Thank You in Egyptian Arabic

An example of this is the Alf Shokr, which is a variation on the Shukran. “Alf shokr” just means “a thousand thanks,” and “Alf” simply means “a thousand thanks.” Other countries, including Egypt and Lebanon and Syria, make use of this substance.

Moutashekkir متشكر

Moutashekkir is a dialect of Egyptian Arabic that is virtually entirely utilized in the Egyptian context. It may be utilized in any circumstance – both casual and formal – and is quite versatile. To use the pronoun ‘we,’ you would say moutashekreen, if you were addressing a man, you would say moutashekkira, and if you were addressing a female, the pronoun would be muatshekreen.

Shukran Gazeelanشكراً جزيلاً

If you feel that a simple thank you isn’t sufficient, you may always sayhukran gazeelan, which translates as “thank you very much.” Note: Although the word is derived from Modern Standard Arabic, it is pronounced as a “j” in Modern Standard Arabic and other Arabic dialects.

However, in Egyptian Arabic, the letter “g” is pronounced as “gh.” As a result, in MSA, isshukran jazeelan is used. It is also known as shukran jazeelan in Syria and Lebanon, among other places. Continue reading this: 40 Essential Egyptian Arabic Phrases to Speak Like a Local

Thank You in Levantine Arabic

If you feel that a simple thank you isn’t enough, you can always sayhukran gazeelan, which translates as “thank you very much.” However, in Modern Standard Arabic, as well as in other dialects of Arabic, the “j” is pronounced instead of the letter “a,” as in the example above. However, in Egyptian Arabic, the letter “g” is pronounced as “g.” As a result, isshukran jazeelan is used in MSA. In addition to Syria and Lebanon, shukran jazeelan is also utilized. Follow this link to learn more about To seem more Egyptian, here are 40 basic Egyptian Arabic phrases.

Merci ميرسي

If you feel that a simple thank you isn’t quite enough, you may always sayhukran gazeelan, which translates as “thank you very much.” Note: Although the word is derived from Modern Standard Arabic, the letter j is pronounced as a “j” in Modern Standard Arabic and other Arabic dialects. However, in Egyptian Arabic, the letter “g” is pronounced as a “g.” As a result, in MSA, isshukran jazeelan. Shukran jazeelan is also popular in Syria and Lebanon. Take a look at the following: 40 Essential Egyptian Arabic Phrases to Speak Like a Native

Yisalamo يسْلمو

Yisalamo is a wonderful way of saying thank you in Arabic, and it is pronounced as It literally means “may they be protected.” Use it when someone gives you something or extends their hand to assist you; it is quite effective. However, it is also a generic means of expressing gratitude in the majority of instances. Continue reading 50+ Basic Levantine Arabic Phrases and Words to Sound Local in the Levant

Thank you in Gulf Arabic

It’s OK to usema Qassart if you’d like to convey to the person you’re thanking that they did their best or put out a significant amount of effort. It basically translates as ‘you didn’t restrict your favor to me.’

Mashkoor مشكور

A passive term that means “you have been thanked,” it fulfills the same function as the word “thank you” above, and it is frequently used by individuals to convey their thanks in everyday settings. The word mashkoor is used while speaking to a man, whereas the word mashkoora is used when speaking to a woman.

Yaatik al afyeيعطيك العافية

Afye, which is Arabic for “May God give you health,” means “May God give you health.” It is also acknowledged in the Arabic language of the Levant.

Thank you in Maghrebi Arabic

Yeayishak literally translates as ‘wishing you a long life,’ and is used as a form of prayer of gratitude for a favor that someone has done for you. Tunisia is one of the countries that use it.

Thank you in MSA Arabic

Let’s have a look at the several ways to express gratitude in Modern Standard Arabic. The items in the list are arranged in descending order of how frequently they are used. Thanks, Shukran, is the most widely used form of saying thank you in Arabic, including the Middle East Standard Arabic (MSA), however we have left it off this list because we have already discussed it before.

Shukran lak شكراً لك

Shukran lak (Thai: ) is a type of soup.

This phrase is used to express gratitude in a formal manner. The word is pronounced differently depending on the gender and number of people who are being addressed. The following table lists the various ways we express our gratitude, as well as how they are pronounced.

Addressee Arabic Arabic Transliteration
Masculine singular شكراً لكَ Shukran laka
Feminine singular شكراً لكِ Shukran laki
Two males or females شكراً لكما Shukran lakoma
Three or more males شكراً لكم Shukran lakom
Three or more females شكراً لكنَّ Shukran lakonna

Ashkorok أشكرك

Ashkorok literally translates as “I thank you,” and the conjugation of this word is shown in the following table.

Addressee Arabic Arabic Transliteration
Masculine singular أشكركَ Ashkoroka
Feminine singular أشكركِ Askoroki
Two males or females أشكركما Ashkorokoma
Three or more males أشكركم Ashkorokom
Three or more females أشكركنَّ Ashkorokonna

Shukran jazelanشكراً جزيلاً

You can make use of shukran jazelan if you like. If shukran doesn’t fully express how grateful you are, there are other options. Adding the word jazelan, which means ‘a great deal,’ can enhance the meaning of this statement. As a result, using the phrase shukran jazelan is equivalent to saying “thank you very much.” It is more commonly employed in formal contexts, such as when drafting a letter or in a corporate environment, rather than in everyday conversation.

Barak allah feekبارك الله فيك

Arabs use the phrase barak allah feek as an alternative to the phrase shukran to express gratitude to someone for their efforts. In its exact translation, it means ‘God bless you.’ It is important to note that each person’s interpretation of the term will be slightly different than the previous instances provided. The following table lists the various ways you can express ‘God bless you’ in Arabic, summarized in one place.

Addressee Arabic Arabic Transliteration
Masculine singular بارك الله فيكَ Barak alla feeka
Feminine singular بارك الله فيكِ Barak alla feeki
Two males or females بارك الله فيكما Barak alla feekoma
Three or more males بارك الله فيكم Barak alla feekom
Three or more females بارك الله فيكنَّ Barak alla feekonna

Jazaka Allahu Khayranجزاك الله خيراً

The phrase Jazaka Allahu Khayran is used to express gratitude to others by praying for them to obtain goodness in exchange for the assistance or service they have provided for you. It can be translated as ‘May God reward you with goodness’ in other languages. The term is pronounced differently depending on who is speaking to whom, as seen below.

Addressee Arabic Arabic Transliteration
Masculine singular جزاكَ الله خيراً Jazaka allahu khayran
Feminine singular جزاكِ الله خيراً Jazaki allahu khayran
Two males or females جزاكما الله خيراً Jazakoma allahu khayran
Three or more males جزاكم الله خيراً Jazakom allahu khayran
Three or more females جزاكُنَّ الله خيراً Jazakonna allahu khayran

Momtanon lakممتنّ لك

Momtanon lak is a charming polite statement that may be translated as ‘I’m glad for you.’ It is derived from the Thai language.

Addressee Arabic Arabic Transliteration
Masculine singular ممتن لكَ Momtanon laka
Feminine singular ممتن لكِ Momtanon laki
Two males or females ممتن لكما Momtanon lakoma
Three or more males ممتن لكم Momtanon lakom
Three or more females ممتن لكنَّ Momtanon lakonna

Salimat Yadak سلمت يداك

The phrase ‘God bless your hands’ can be used to express gratitude in a highly formal and courteous manner to anyone. It is written in the Arabic language and means ‘God bless your hands’.

Addressee Arabic Arabic Transliteration
Masculine singular سلمت يداكَ Salimat Yadaka
Feminine singular سلمت يداكِ Salimat Yadaki
Two males or females سلمت يداكما Salimat Yadakoma
Three or more males سلمت يداكم Salimat Yadakom
Three or more females سلمت يداكنَّ Salimat Yadakonna

Conclusion

Whatever language you choose to communicate in, make certain that it is the language of your heart. Learn to express yourself politely and to show appreciation for others in your everyday life circumstances. If you are involved in Arabic events or encounter Arabic people, it is always beneficial to have a working knowledge of the most common phrases they use, such as the phrases used to express gratitude to one another that we have presented in this article. Thank you for following up on this!

How To Say ‘Thank you’ in {language}

The practice of showing gratitude in some form or another is prevalent throughout most cultures. Gratitude is defined as follows by the dictionary: “the trait of being appreciative; willingness to express appreciation for and to reciprocate kindness.” It is frequently the ‘glue’ that holds relationships together that we express our real gratitude in response to someone’s deeds or words. This is true in the majority of civilizations. When you do so in a foreign nation, you are also demonstrating your respect and admiration for the local culture.

The following is a table of contents:

  1. ‘Thank you’ in Arabic can be expressed in a variety of ways. Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes with this Video Lesson
  2. Infographic Survival Phrases – Thank You
  3. Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases A Video Lesson on How to Say “Thank You” in 31 Different Languages
  4. What ArabicPod101 Can Do To Assist You

So, what is the proper way to express “thank you” in Arabic?

You can pick up new skills quickly! In the section below, ArabicPod101 provides you with flawless translations and pronunciation as you study the most popular ways Arabic people express gratitude in a variety of settings.

1. 12 Ways to say ‘Thank you’ in Arabic

1- Thank you very much. شكراšukran There are some magic phrases that can put a grin on anyone’s face. If you utter these words with genuine sincerity for just one day, you’ll notice how much better your mood will be. 2- Thank you so much for your generosity. If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected] or [phone number]. Dah karam mennak, dah karam mennak. Using this statement is suitable when someone goes out of their way to provide you with excellent service or to extend a courtesy to you.

  • This is an excellent example of how to be creative.
  • That is thoughtful of him/her, so express your appreciation!
  • If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me at [email protected].
  • If you’re conducting more formal meetings with Arabic speakers, this greeting phrase should be on your list of go-to phrases.
  • 5- Thank you for taking the time to read this.

akorak ehtemmak, akorak ehtemmak To express gratitude for someone’s consideration and sensitivity towards you in a more formal, almost somber manner, use the following phrase: It is also appropriate for situations in which a native speaker is required to assess what you have submitted, such as a job application, a project, or a proposal.

  1. 6- Many thanks for your help!
  2. okran gazlan, okran gazlan!
  3. In Arabic, it has a meaning that is very similar to the phrase “thank you very much.” In an informal situation with your Arabic friends or professors, use this to express yourself.
  4. I’m a man of the Sahl, and I’m a modarresn zayyak.
  5. Some phrases are compliments, and they show thanks by inference in the context of the sentence.
  6. If you’re very taken with your ArabicPod101 instructor, this is a great phrase to keep in your memory bank!
  7. If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected].

The ability to communicate in Arabic is essential for any host of an event with Arabic speakers, such as a meeting or party.

It might also be a great way to express your appreciation to your Arabic language instructor for her time.

If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected].

This is yet another phrase that is guaranteed to melt the hearts of any formal or informal Arabic teacher!

Thank them or her for their assistance!

Your ability to express thanks will go a long way toward making you a popular employee — thankfulness is the most endearing quality in anyone!

If you want to know more about me, please contact me at [email protected].

This is also an enthusiastic way to express gratitude to your teacher through the use of a compliment.

11- Thank you very much for the present.

okran el-hedeyyah is an Arabic phrase that means “the king of the hill.” When you’re the lucky recipient of a present, it’s a good idea to keep this phrase in mind.

12- I have gained a great deal of knowledge as a result of your guidance.

If you have any questions, please contact us at [email protected]. There is no such thing as an etallemt ketr aw besababak. What a fantastic tribute to pay to a dedicated educator! It indicates that they have achieved their aim, and you are grateful for their efforts.

2. Video Lesson: Learn to Say ‘Thank You’ in 3 Minutes

Regardless of where you are going, good manners are required! Furthermore, Morocco is no exception in this regard. 1- Shukran In Arabic, the word for “thank you” is isshukran(). The word hukran literally translates as “thank you.” This is a highly informal phrase that may be used in a variety of settings, including restaurants, shopping, and just about everywhere else. two-hundred-and-fortieth Shukran Jaziilan is a fictional character created by Shukran Jaziilan. Now, in Arabic, there is a more formal means to show one’s appreciation than previously existed.

As we already taught, the first word in the phrasehukran() is a slang term for “thank you.” This is followed by the word jaziilan(), which literally translates as “a lot.” As a result, the terms shukran jaziilan() and shukran jaziilan() combined indicate “thank you very much.” When sending thank-you cards or thanking someone for inviting you to their house for lunch or dinner, this phrase is used in a formal manner.

  1. It is also commonly used in formal business settings and other formal occasions.
  2. The first word, baaraka(), literally translates as “to bless.” This is followed by the Arabic word allahu(), which means “God” in English.
  3. This is known as the “Moroccan salute.” Using this gesture conveys the message that it is truly coming from the heart.
  4. Quick Tip 2Since this is your first interaction with Arabic, here is some background information on this fascinating language, as well as information on other languages spoken in Morocco.
  5. In addition, approximately 10 million Moroccans, mostly from rural areas, speak Berber as a first language or as a bilingual language with the spoken Arabic dialect, which is a dialect of Arabic.
  6. Many Moroccans in the northern portion of the nation, particularly in the city of Rabat, speak Arabic.
  7. Are you on the run from a nation that speaks Arabic?
  8. You can’t function properly unless you know some fundamental language phrases.

Knowing how to say ‘Thank you’ in the Arabic language, whether in person or online, can only enhance their perception of you! With this brief session, ArabicPod101 saves you time while still providing a powerful learning experience. It takes no time at all to learn how to say “Thank you” in Arabic!

3. Audio Lesson: Survival Phrases – Thank You

Respect for others is essential, no matter where you go. Likewise, Morocco is not an exception in this regard, 1- Shukran ‘Thank you’ is spelled as shukran in Arabic. To translate the term “thank you,” the wordhukran is used. This is a highly informal phrase that may be used in a variety of settings, including restaurants, shopping, and pretty much everywhere else. two-hundred-and-fifty-fifty Shukran Jaziilan is a fictional character created by Shukran Jaziilan in the fictional world of Shukran.

In the Arabic language, “Thank you very much” is written as shukran jaziilan.

The terms shukran jaziilan() and jaziilan() combined translate to “thank you very much.” When sending thank-you cards or thanking someone for inviting you to their house for lunch or dinner, this phrase is used in a formal manner.

three- adverbial phrase Baaraka Allahu Fiik is an Arabic phrase that means “thank you, Allah.” On those truly exceptional times when someone goes above and beyond the call of duty to be nice, when someone is exceedingly generous, or any other event when you are extremely appreciative, you can show your thanks with the following phrase: It is possible to say anything like “Thank you very much” with the phrase baaraka allahu fiik( ), despite the fact that the literal meaning is completely different.

  1. To bless is the meaning of the initial wordbaaraka().
  2. fiik() is the final word in this phrase, and it literally means “within you.” Together, the three wordsbaaraka allahu fiikliterally translate as “God bless you,” which can be used to express gratitude in a variety of situations.
  3. Quick Tip 1When Moroccans wish to convey profound appreciation, they typically lay their right hand on their breast while saying thank you.
  4. However, if you see other people doing it, that is what it signifies.
  5. Given that this is your first interaction with Arabic, here is some background information on this fascinating language, as well as information on other languages spoken in Morocco.
  6. In addition, over 10 million Moroccans, especially from rural regions, speak Berber as a first language or as a bilingual language with the spoken Arabic dialect, which is the most widely spoken dialect in Morocco.
  7. In the northern part of the country, Arabic is widely spoken by a large number of people.
  8. In a hurry to get to a country where the language is spoken in Arabic?
  9. There is no way you can get by without knowing at least a few fundamental language phrases.

If you know how to say “thank you” in the Arabic language, whether in person or on the internet, it will only enhance their perception of you. With this short lesson, ArabicPod101 saves you time while still providing a lot of value. It takes no time at all to learn how to say “thank you” in Arabic!

4. ‘Thank You’ in 31 Languages

Here are 31 quick and easy methods to express gratitude to those who have helped you on your journey across the world. These are the very first words you should learn in any foreign language – they will undoubtedly help you get along better with native speakers by expressing your appreciation for services performed and your respect for their cultural heritage! In this brief video, you will learn and understand how to effectively say ‘Thank you’ in 31 different languages.

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5. Why would ArabicPod101 be the perfect choice to learn Arabic?

However, you do not have to stop at just saying “thank you” in Arabic — why not learn to speak the language? You have absolutely nothing to lose by trying it out. According to research, learning a new language increases intelligence and helps to slow down the aging process of the brain. Apart from that, being able to converse well with native speakers in their own language is a certain way to make friends and get respect. Alternatively, suppose that you know how to express gratitude to that particular Arabic friend after a date.he or she will be overjoyed!

ArabicPod101 Has Special Lessons, Tools and Resources to Teach You How to Say Thank You and Other Key Phrases

Over the course of more than a decade of operation, we have taught thousands of pleased customers to communicate in a variety of different languages. What is the best way to go about it? First and foremost, we alleviate the discomfort of learning! Students at ArabicPod101 are guided through the process of mastering vocabulary, pronunciation, and conversation through the use of cutting-edge and entertaining online learning methods. It is possible to learn at your own pace and in your own space thanks to a library brimming with learning resources!

  1. Each month, we add new benefits in the form of FREE bonuses and gifts to make your experience even better.
  2. You can, on the other hand, opt to accelerate your fluency by customizing your lessons and increasing interactive learning and practicing.
  3. Your ability to communicate in Arabic will improve dramatically with this form of aid, as well as with your enjoyment of the process on your part.
  4. The best part is that you’re never by yourself!
  5. When you enroll with us, you will immediately have access to our vibrant forum, where we will meet and welcome one other as well as debate your pressing questions.

It is highly possible that you will practice your first ‘Thank you!’ in Arabic with one of our trained teachers, and that you will mean it. Hurry up and register as soon as possible – you will thank us later.

58 Basic Arabic Words Every Dubai Expat Should Know (2022)

Are you relocating to Dubai? Learning the local culture is usually beneficial when relocating to a new place, and the easiest way to do it is by being fluent in the language of the new location. Arabic is the primary language spoken in Dubai, and there are more than 300 million Arabic speakers in the world. Arabic is the primary language spoken in Dubai. In addition to being the official language of the 22 countries that make up the Arab League, Arabic is also the language of the majority of people who live in the region that stretches across the Middle East and North Africa.

  • Here are some phrases you can use in the meantime to get around while you are exploring Dubai.
  • Greetings, Marhaba 2.
  • Kaeefhalak 3.
  • Greetings, Sabah el khair4 and good evening.
  • Salutations, TaHiat6.
  • 7.
  • MaAzera 8.

Put an end to Tawaqaf11.

Shukran-Lak 12.

I’m not sure what to say.

Who?/What?

Where?/Why?

How much is it?

How much does it set you back?

18.

Kam al Aadad is a 19-year-old boy from Yemen.

halTaTaKalamalanglizia 20.

What’s your name, by the way?

It is a pleasure to meet you.

Hello, my name is.

24.

Is KaeefyomKanany El Hosoolala a real person?

Can you tell me where.?

What is the status of hazahowa et-tareeqela?

Is it possible for me to drive here?

I believe I’ve been disoriented.

Is it a safe or a dangerous activity?

Can you tell me where I can get.?

Help!

mosaAda 32.

aHtajelaTabib33.

AendeeHuma 34.

EnahuMoalem 35.

Al alamhuna (The Alamhuna) 36.

Ayna Al Hamam is a female hamam.

Do you have access to a telephone?

38.

Ayna Al Mustashfaa (Ayna Al Mustashfaa) 39.

SayarateeTaAtalat40.

Aynaaqrab Karaj/maHatetbanseen (Aynaaqrab Karaj/maHatetbanseen) 41.

AynaaqrabSarafaalee 42.

Could you please take me to.?

My friend has been injured or is ill.

What time is it exactly?

Thank you.

46.

Shoo Hada?

47.

ShoofiMafi?

The best of the best Tamaam 49.

TaalBukra 50.

It is very natural.

Please bring me some tea, or can I please have some tea?

Call or email me if you want to talk.

I’m Interested in Finding Out AreedAreef 55.

Of course, MumkenAsaduq56 is correct.

Andi58. What is the monthly rent? Kam Al Ijara is an Arabic phrase that means “Kam Al Ijara” (Kam Al Ijara is the Arabic word for “Kam Al Ijara”). Do you have any additional regularly used Arabic phrases that you would want to include in the list? Please share them in the comments section.

Top Ten Arabic Words

Dubai is a cosmopolitan melting pot. Take a step outside and you’ll hear people conversing in a variety of languages from all over the world, including English, French, Russian, Hindi, Urdu, Swahili, and a dozen more dialects. The genuine language of the Emirati people, on the other hand, is Arabic. If you want to get around in Dubai, knowing a few basic Arabic phrases will be extremely beneficial. Here is our list of the Top Ten Arabic Words that will be useful to you when traveling in the United Arab Emirates.

Greetings

In Arabic, the proper manner to welcome someone is with the phrase Assalam Alaikum, which translates as “Peace be with you.” The term is used to express respect for a business colleague, a teacher, an old person, or anybody else who deserves to be treated with great courtesy and courtesy in return. The appropriate response to this statement isWalaikum Assalam, which translates as “and peace to you.” If you want a more informal greeting, there are a variety of Arabic terms for hello that you may use.

When a visitor arrives in Dubai for the first time, it is probable that they will hear those words said as they enter the nation and experience the legendary Arabian hospitality.

You may also utilize greetings that are dependent on the time of day to welcome people.

When someone says “good morning” in Sabah Al Khayris, the response is “Sabah Al Noor,” which translates as “a dawn of light.”

How are you?

With Assalam Alaikum, which translates as “Peace be with you,” you may express your formal greeting in Arabic. The statement is used to express respect for a business partner, a teacher, an old person, or anybody else who ought to be treated with special consideration. To this phrase, the appropriate response isWalaikum Assalam, which literally translates as “and peace to you.” You can use many different Arabic words for hello if you prefer a more casual greeting. There are several common greetings, the most common of which are Marhaba and Ahlan, which can be used interchangeably as hello and welcome.

The first of the Top Ten Arabic words to know in the United Arab Emirates is unquestionably.

Individuals who hear these types of greetings typically answer by saying them back – for example, someone who hears “Good morning” will respond by responding “Good morning.” Arabic responses are simply a continuation of the greeting that was originally given.

“Good morning,” says Sabah Al Khayris, and the response is “Sabah Al Noor,” which translates as “a morning of light” in Arabic.

What is your name?

The people of Dubai, particularly those who are tourists, are extremely friendly. It is likely that you will meet a lot of new people and introduce yourself to them along the way on your journey. Say Ma Ismakh when you want to ask someone their name. You can express your gratitude by sayingIsmii., which translates as “My name is.”

Yes and No

Even if you don’t have much to say, these basic words will enable you to engage in an Arabic discussion. IsNa’amand correct? No, there isn’t.

God willing

In Dubai, the term Insha’Allahpepped into discussions is commonplace, even in talks that are conducted in English. God willing or by the grace of God is the literal translation of the phrase. In a sense, it is a means of accepting that we do not have complete control over our own destiny. “I’ll have it ready by tomorrow, insha’allah,” for example, could be used by someone to speak about their own goals while still accepting the possibility that unanticipated events might develop.

I don’t understand

It is critical for a traveler visiting a foreign nation to recognize and accept one’s own limits. If you’re having trouble understanding what someone is saying, try sayingLa Afham, which simply translates as “I don’t grasp.”

I am lost

This is surely another term that a traveler will find handy. Ada’tu tareeqimemeans “I have been disoriented.” If you do become disoriented while in Dubai, don’t become very concerned. You’ll discover that the inhabitants in this city are quite friendly, and they are always willing to assist visitors in getting their bearings.

Please and Thank you

Keep your etiquette in check! The name is MinFadlak in Arabic, while the name is Shukran in English. Perhaps you could try using these terms the next time you are placing an order at a restaurant or making a purchase from a store? It will almost certainly make your transaction go more smoothly.

How much?

Shopaholics will find enough to do in Dubai, whether it’s in the glamorous malls or in the bustling markets of the city. Using the phraseKam Ath-Thaman, you may enquire about the price of an item, which will be useful while bargaining with the vendor. When traveling to a new place, being able to communicate in the local language may be quite beneficial. We hope you have found this guide on the Top Ten Arabic Words to Help You Succeed in the United Arab Emirates to be useful. Give the language a go, and you’ll be signing up for extra classes before you know it!

How to greet in Arabic

82Dubai’s Cultural and Historical Heritage You’re in Dubai, and you want to be able to speak the talk while also walking the walk. Having a basic understanding of Arabic is a fantastic method to do this. You’ll want to be familiar with some of the important terms if you’re planning on experiencing the legendary “Arab hospitality.” From the moment you meet someone until the moment you say goodbye, you will be enveloped with warmth and friendliness. And it’s not just a matter of saying “hi” either.

You are always made to feel welcome!

For example, when two men shake hands, they frequently come face-to-face to allow their noses to come into contact with one another.

Just a quick note: if someone of the opposing gender refuses to shake your hand, don’t be concerned; you did nothing to deserve this treatment.

Some individuals in this town simply feel that men and women should not make physical contact while greeting one other. Here’s some more information on how to welcome someone correctly in Arabic:

How to say “hello”

Even if it’s OK to address a group of individuals, make sure you address each individual by name. This will go a long way toward establishing a courteous atmosphere. The following are examples of common ways to welcome someone:

  • Regards, As-Salam ‘Alykum– This is, without a doubt, the most often used greeting. It literally translates as “peace be upon you.” If you listen closely, you’ll notice that the greeting has a similar ring to the words “Muslim,”” Islam,” and “salaam,” all of which have their roots in the word “sallima,” which means to “surrender (to the will of God). When it comes to Muslims, the greeting reflects their religious identity and is intended to communicate to the other person that they, too, are a Muslim. For non-Muslims, I’d encourage that they use it with Arabs they are familiar with. If you are welcomed in this manner, the appropriate response is “Wa ‘alaykum as-salam,” which means “peace be upon you as well.”
  • Ahlan (hello). This may be used by anybody at any hour of the day and is completely anonymous. As you approach them, clasp your hands together and kiss them on the cheeks while saying “Ahlan.” Females will only kiss other ladies, and men will only kiss other men, according to tradition. This is also dependent on the nature of the interaction between the individuals. This is the more formal variant of the greeting “Ahlan Wa Sahlan” (welcome). The most common response to a guy is “Ahlan bik,” and the most common response to a girl is “Ahlan biki.” “Ahlan bikum
  • Marhaba,” if you want to respond to more than one individual (Welcome) It derives from the Arabic word “rahhaba,” which literally means “to welcome.” A typical response is “Marhaban bik,” “Marhaban biki,” and “Marhaban bikum” when addressing a male, a female, or a group of people
  • “Marhaban bik” is often used when addressing more than one person.

Time-Specific Greetings

You may also welcome folks based on the time of day they are greeting you. In the morning, you can greet someone with the phrase “Sabah al-khayr,” which translates as “good morning.” There are various possible responses to this greeting in Arabic, as opposed to the limited number of options available in English, depending on the speaker’s mood and level of imagination. The most often heard response is “Sabah an-noor,” which translates as “dawn or light.” In addition to “dawn of light,” the speaker can change the phrase to “morning of joy,” “morning of beauty,” “morning of the rose,” and so on.

“Misa’ al-khayr” is met by “Misa’ an-noor,” which is a response.

“Good night” is stated with the phrase “Tisbah ‘ala khayr,” which roughly translates as “wake up to the good,” and the response is “Wa anta/anti min ahloo,” which approximately translates as “and may you be one of the good.”

Rose water and Arabic Coffee

Rose water and Arabic coffee are two examples of additional ways in which Arab hospitality is demonstrated. Rose water is an ancient Bedouin practice that is poured over your hands as soon as you arrive at your destination. Because the Bedouins were desert nomads, they performed this to refresh their guests and wash away any undesirable scents that had accrued throughout their journeys through the desert. Arabic coffee, on the other hand, is a little more fascinating since there are two different methods to welcome someone with it.

However, if you are given a full cup, you will have to finish it and go on with your day.

Want to learn more?

It goes without saying that there is much more to Arabic greetings than what has been presented thus far. Using a variety of welcomes helps you sound more fluid. So make an effort to recall as many as you can. Download our Dubai RulesEtiquette Guide for further information on how to greet people in the Arabic language properly.

How to say Thank You in 50 languages

Sustaining one’s existence in a nation where English is not widely spoken and one does not speak the native language can be difficult at times. Perhaps the most important word you can learn to express your openness to learn is the age-old and dependable phrase “thank you.” You’ll find that a little goes a long way, and you’ll be sure to gain some friends among the locals. Knowing how to express gratitude in German has certainly came in useful throughout the years I spent traveling around Europe on business and pleasure.

Here’s how to express gratitude in 50 different languages so you’ll never be stuck again!

How to say thank you in 50 Languages

We’re off to a good start! You’re going to learn about the 50 most widely used languages for expressing gratitude to others. Thanks for your help. After over a decade of travel, I’ve learned that there is no more meaningful word than “thank you.” So let’s get started!

1. How to say thank you in Afrikaans

Afrikaans is a language spoken primarily in Southern Africa, with a few exceptions. It is particularly popular in South Africa and Namibia, where it is extensively spoken. Botswana, Zambia, and Zimbabwe are the only countries where it is less frequent. In contrast, the word “dankie” is generally known throughout Southern Africa and will go a long way in helping you get acceptance from the natives!

2. How to say thank you in Albanian

If you find yourself in Southern Europe and are seeking for a nation to spend some time in on the cheap, Albania is a good option to consider. This nation has long been ignored by the standard tourist routes, but for those looking for a more culturally connected experience, there is nothing better. Albania, on the other hand, is gradually becoming a popular tourist destination, so make sure to include it in your itinerary as soon as possible! Continue reading: The 20 finest sites to visit in the Balkans that you should not miss!

3. How to say thank you in Arabic

No matter where you go in the Arabic world, a courteous “shukran” will always be there to greet you with a grin. It has always came in useful during my travels in Northern Africa and the Middle East, and this small thank you is no exception. Simple acts of gratitude, such as expressing thank you in Arabic, are often appreciated and well received.

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4. How to say thank you in Armenian

Armenia is a country that is still on my bucket list, therefore it is out of reach for the time being. If you ever have the opportunity to travel to Armenia, learning to say thank you in Armenian is a certain way to put a smile on the face of every stranger you come across. And, while it is a lengthy term for native English speakers, it is quite easy to remember if you break it down into its constituent parts.

5. How to say thank you in Bosnian

Bosnia and Herzegovina is one of the most interesting places I’ve ever visited. During my first visit, when I was in my early twenties, I was absolutely enthralled. I couldn’t believe that no one else seemed to be talking about this relatively obscure nation! But, of course, Bosnia and Herzegovina is becoming increasingly popular, and for good reason. If you have the opportunity to travel to Bosnia and Herzegovina, make sure to understand how to express gratitude in the native language. Visit the monastery at Blagaj, which was constructed into the rock face, and you won’t be disappointed.

6. How to say thank you in Bulgarian

If you are fortunate enough to travel to Eastern Europe, you will quickly discover that there are a plethora of hidden gems to discover. There are entire nations that are overlooked by many travelers, and Bulgaria is one of those countries, in my opinion. Learning to say thank you in the local language will be quite important when you are visiting Bulgaria, especially if you plan on staying for an extended period of time.

7. How to say thank you in Catalan

In Catalonia, a simple “thank you” may go a long way. Locals particularly adore a simple and genuine “thank you” or “gratis,” especially during the height of tourist season when they don’t hear it as frequently as they would like. Despite the fact that Barcelona is by far my favorite location in the area, there is so much more to Catalonia than just one city!

If you have more time, be sure to plan some day trips in the area or locate a local homestay where you can stay for a longer period of time to relax. You will not be disappointed!

8. How to say thank you in Cantonese

Learning how to express gratitude in Cantonese has undoubtedly been beneficial throughout the years, particularly when bargaining for a lower price at the night markets in Hong Kong. It is always a pleasure to be greeted with a warm and pleasant grin when you take the time to express your gratitude in a new language, and Cantonese speakers in particular seem to appreciate it when tourists make the effort.

9. How to say thank you in Croatian

Using English to express gratitude in Croatia will be generally understood, but learning how to express gratitude in Croatian will not damage your chances of getting along with the locals. If you’ve ever been to Dubrovnik and rubbed shoulders with the throngs of visitors that descend on the city during the summer months, you’ll understand exactly why. In Croatia, a simple “hvala” will go a long way toward establishing a positive impression.

10. How to say thank you in Czech

Prague is without a doubt one of my favorite cities in Central Europe, out of all the nations I’ve been there. There is something inherently distinct and otherworldly about the architecture in this country, particularly in Prague. I quickly discovered that expressing thank you in Czech may go a long way with the people who live there. Even more so if you’re ordering beverages in a bar or restaurant! More information may be found at: Where to locate the greatest views in Prague

11. How to say thank you in Danish

Thank you in Danish is a simple and straightforward expression. It’s always useful to know how to say “tak,” and the locals will appreciate your efforts, despite the fact that practically everyone speaks English. This will be warmly received by the elder generation of artisans and shopkeepers who either do not speak English or speak it very poorly since they recognize the effort put forth. More information may be found at: These are the cities in Europe where it is most costly to travel.

12. How to say thank you in Dutch

My goal is to inform anybody who will listen that the Netherlands is so much more than just Amsterdam, and I will take advantage of whatever opportunity I can get. If you have the opportunity to travel around the Netherlands, it might behoove you to learn how to express your gratitude in Dutch. Moreover, if you’re seeking for a guide on what else to see and do in the Netherlands other than Amsterdam, please see the section below. You will not be disappointed! More information may be found at: The Netherlands has seven cities and towns that you really must see.

13. How to say thank you in Estonian

The country of Estonia took me completely by surprise, and I don’t think I’ve ever been more startled by a country in my life. This was particularly true of Tallinn’s Old Town, which was so picturesque that I returned there twice more after my first visit. If you find yourself here on a day excursion from Helsinki, a simple thank you in the local tongue will go a long way toward making your experience more pleasant.

14. How to say thank you in Finnish

In the past several years, I’ve had the opportunity to travel to Finland on a number of occasions, and each visit has been a joyous experience. The fact that Finland has continuously ranked as one of the world’s happiest countries means that it is not a huge concern if you do not learn to say thank you.

Everyone in this town is quite relaxed and carefree. However, if you do say “kiitos” when you have the opportunity, I can promise you that they will appreciate it.

15. How to say thank you in French

I can think of no other place in the world where it is more vital to express gratitude in the local language than France, and I believe there is no other country in the world where it is more important than in France. The people not only enjoy it, but they also anticipate it. And, given the fact that you are in their nation, this seems like a legitimate request! All you have to do is memorize a few essential words, one of which is the word “mercy,” which is a straightforward expression.

16. How to say thank you in German

I’ll never forget my time in Berlin, which I spent studying and working there. Germany’s capital city, Berlin, has so many distinct characteristics that it is impossible to become bored while living there. Indeed, in the few months that I spent in the city, I felt as if I had just begun to scrape the surface of what was available to me. In my daily life, one term that sprang to me was “danke.” When it comes to communicating in German, thank you is an absolute must. If you only learn one word, make it this one.

17. How to say thank you in Greek

Because Greece contains so many incredible must-see attractions, many of us dream of one day traveling to the Greek Islands to experience them all. If you are fortunate enough to travel, make sure to learn how to express your gratitude in Greek. Your contributions will be much appreciated by the locals.

18. How to say thank you in Hawaiian

Despite the fact that Hawaii is a state of the United States, the islanders have maintained their polynesian culture, traditions, and, of course, language. Mahalo is a great way to express gratitude, and it has such a poetic flow that it literally simply flows off the tongue when you say it! The people of Hawaii are equally as gorgeous, friendly, and relaxed as the landscape.

19. How to say thank you in Hebrew

However, while it may be difficult to read Hebrew, it is rather simple to say a brief “thank you” or “today” in the language. This will come in helpful while trying to get the support of the locals.

20. How to say thank you in Hindi

If you happen to find yourself in India, it wouldn’t hurt to learn a few basic Hindi phrases. Despite the fact that you will most likely be able to get by without it, the locals will appreciate your effort.

21. How to say thank you in Hungarian

Learning to communicate in Hungarian is not required while traveling to the nation, but it will come in useful if you want to spend time outside of Budapest. Even in the capital city, though, the ability to express gratitude goes a long way.

22. How to say thank you in Icelandic

To express gratitude in Icelandic is so simple that there is no reason not to learn how to say “takk” (thank you) yourself!

23. How to say thank you in Indonesian

Despite the fact that it may appear or sound tough at first, I assure you that expressing thank you in Indonesian quickly becomes addicting. It is really popular among the locals!

24. How to say thank you in Italian

The Italian way of saying “thank you” is simple and a lot of fun. Italians are enthusiastic about sharing their culture with guests, so it never hurts to learn a few words or phrases in their language if you can get by with only shaky English.

25. How to say thank you in Japanese

My interest in traveling around Japan has not waned despite my several visits to this beautiful nation.

Simply said, there’s something really tranquil and pleasant about it. Learning to say thank you helps ensure that you have a positive impression on the locals.

26. How to say thank you in Korean

In the event that you are fortunate enough to find yourself in Korea, make sure to learn how to say “thank you” quickly!

27. How to say thank you in Latvian

In Latvia, saying “thank you” is as simple as saying “paddies.” It is rather simple to remember, and the locals will appreciate your attempt to communicate (even if your pronunciation isn’t exactly correct!)

28. How to say thank you in Lebanese

If you find yourself in Lebanon, a simple “choukrane” will go a long way toward alleviating your situation.

29. How to say thank you in Lithuanian

Sneezing is a common sound in Lithuania when someone says thank you! As a result, it is rather simple to recall.

30. How to say thank you in Macedonian

Gratitude in Macedonian is a little more difficult to remember than in other languages. However, if you happen to find yourself in the nation, make sure to learn the language. It will be warmly welcomed because there aren’t many western tourists who find their way to this part of the world.

31. How to say thank you in Malay

Saying thank you in Malay is the same as saying it in Indonesian or English. Consequently, if you’re traveling in South East Asia, make a point of saying a quick thank you to everyone you come across!

32. How to say thank you in Maltese

Malta’s geographical position in the Adriatic Sea explains why this language is so closely related to Italian. So, if you find yourself traveling in Southern Europe, you may notice some parallels!

33. How to say thank you in Mandarin

If you plan on traveling around China, it will be beneficial to acquire a few basic words in the language. Thank you is, without a doubt, one of them!

34. How to say thank you in Mongolian

If you happen to find yourself in Mongolia, all I can say is, “Congratulations!” Taking a trip through this nation has been a long-held ambition of mine, especially if I ever have the opportunity to travel on the Trans-Siberian train. The ability to express gratitude will be much appreciated by the people.

35. How to say thank you in Norwegian

It’s simple to express gratitude in Norwegian! A simple “thank you” would always enough if you ever find yourself in a situation when you don’t know how to express yourself properly.

36. How to say thank you in Polish

Polish was one of the first languages in which I learnt to express my gratitude. When I was seventeen years old, I embarked on a journey around Eastern Europe, and Poland was without a doubt one of my favorite places to visit. A little thank you went a long way with the villagers, whose faces lighted up with delight when they heard your message.

37. How to say thank you in Portuguese

Thank you in Portuguese is a little more complicated, and there are differences between the masculine and feminine forms. However, once you’ve gotten the hang of it, it’s actually fairly simple to remember!

38. How to say thank you in Romanian

I visited Romania in my early twenties for a little more than a week and was completely taken aback by the place. This city offers an abundance of sights to see and things to do, especially if you enjoy castles.

39. How to say thank you in Russian

My travels across Russia are among some of my most treasured experiences. I’m a little infatuated with Russia, having studied its history at university and learning about its interesting aristocratic history. Finding yourself in Moscow or St. Petersburg? Learning to say thank you might be really beneficial in this country!

40. How to say thank you in Serbian

It had been a long time since I had visited Serbia, and owing to time restrictions, I was only able to spend a few hours in the capital, Belgrade.

The short nights I spent here, on the other hand, will remain in my memory forever. Because the folks are so gracious and hospitable, be prepared to express your gratitude profusely!

41. How to say thank you in Slovakian

If you happen to find yourself on a European trip, understanding how to say thank you in Slovakian will come in handy. It is a fantastic stopover spot, especially if you are traveling by rail through this little landlocked country in the center of Europe.

42. How to say thank you in Slovenian

It’s difficult to describe what it is about Slovenia that is so appealing. I believe it has something to do with the fact that you don’t anticipate it to be so breathtakingly gorgeous and to have so much to offer in terms of attractions for visitors. Slovenia will appeal to anyone who like castles.

43. How to say thank you in Spanish

Hello there, Spain! Although the phrase “thank you” is understood all across the world, it is believed to have originated in Spain.

44. How to say thank you in Swedish

Throughout my travels in Stockholm, Sweden, I found myself using this a lot! Gratitude is a simple, fast, and addicting way to express yourself in Swedish. More information on my visits to Stockholm may be found here. It is one of my favorite cities on the entire continent of Europe!

45. How to say thank you in Tamil

As an English speaker, thanking someone in Tamil is a rather straightforward procedure. If you are traveling in South Asia and are in the company of Tamil speakers, you will find this to be quite useful.

46. How to say thank you in Thai

There’s a reason why Thailand is regarded as the country with the friendliest people on the planet. Learning to express gratitude is not only beneficial, but it is also vital! I assure you that the people are so gracious and welcoming that you will want to express your gratitude to them on a regular basis.

47. How to say thank you in Turkish

I’m not going to lie: I have a hard time saying thank you in Turkish. Although I am a native English speaker, I find this phrase to be a little difficult to pronounce. However, after a few repetitions of saying it out, it becomes simpler with time!

48. How to say thank you in Ukrainian

I was completely taken by surprise when I arrived in Ukraine during my first tour to Eastern Europe. This country is rich in history, culture, and gastronomy, and it has a distinct cuisine palate. Speaking of food, I sampled a wide variety of dishes. It came in quite helpful to be able to say “thank you” in Ukrainian!

49. How to say thank you in Welsh

Welsh is, in my opinion, one of the most difficult languages to learn to read, write, and speak fluently. The length of some street signs I came across while traveling through the countryside was more than twenty letters. However, expressing gratitude is a rather simple process. Because Welsh is not a widely spoken language in the area, the people will be extremely appreciative of your efforts.

50. How to say thank you in Zulu

In the event that you find yourself in Zulu-speaking South Africa, I can guarantee you that expressing “thank you” in the native tongue will be greatly appreciated! Locals will be surprised and delighted, and they will thank you for it more than you can think. This article was last updated on March 20, 2021. To keep up with us on Instagram, follow us at: Founder Brooke Saward created Globe of Wanderlust as a platform for sharing travel ideas and inspiring people to experience the world.

She currently splits her time between trips abroad and culinary adventures at home, with a special fondness for French pastries as a sweet tooth indulgence. You may find me on social media platforms such as Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

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