What Did You Notice About Dubai? (Solution)

  • Dubai is predominantly a Muslim country, and you will notice this immediately upon landing in the city. Article 7 of the UAE’s Provisional Constitution declares Islam the official state religion of the UAE. With this comes traditions and laws unlike other countries.

What is so special about Dubai?

Dubai is famous for sightseeing attractions such as the Burj Khalifa (the world’s tallest building) and shopping malls that come complete with mammoth aquariums and indoor ski slopes. But this city has many cultural highlights and things to do, as well as all the glamorous modern add-ons.

How would you describe Dubai?

Indulgent, glamorous, and progressive are words that describe Dubai. This United Arab Emirates city is a luxury travel destination for leisure and business travellers. Dubai combines a modern metropolis with a timeless sensibility and Arabian flair.

What are 5 interesting facts about Dubai?

18 strange but true facts about Dubai

  • Dubai was founded in 1833.
  • There were only 13 cars registered in 1968.
  • When it opened in 2009, Dubai Metro was the longest automated rail network in the world.
  • The Palm Jumeirah can be seen from space.
  • There are 2.3 males to every female in Dubai.
  • The UAE has a Minister for Happiness.

What makes Dubai so attractive?

Aside from the beautiful weather and gorgeous beaches, Dubai has an impressive infrastructure and a plethora of stunning buildings. The city is home to the world’s largest malls, the highest tower on the planet and some of the most exclusive restaurants, hotels and nightspots around.

What do u like about Dubai?

Dubai has historic sights, futuristic architecture, active night life and out-of-this-world attractions.

  • See the Desert. Before the skyscrapers and luxurious automobiles, Dubai was only sand.
  • Unique Architecture.
  • The Palm Jumeirah.
  • Burj Khalifa.
  • Gardens in the Desert.
  • The Gold Souk.

What do you love about UAE in 5 words?

Land of great, brave; land of peace and prosperity

  • Land of great, brave, sincere, beautiful and intelligent leaders and people.
  • Beautiful landscapes and beautiful mosques.
  • Land of beautiful beaches.
  • Land of peace and prosperity.
  • Land of tallest building in the world – Burj Khalifa.

Why should I visit Dubai?

Beautiful, shiny skyscrapers, state of the art buildings and beautiful beaches and sand dunes; fine dining; fabulous all-inclusive accommodation options, shopping at Dubai Mall and adrenaline filled experiences all make Dubai a fantastic tourist destination.

Why Dubai is my Favourite city?

Walking through the beaches of jumeirah to the unending passages of creek makes it so mesmerizing that you would never want to turn back from there. Dubai is just a perfect place for the extremists like me, on one end you have world’s tallest tower while on the other are oldest the trading zones of creek.

What is UAE known for?

The UAE is known for its two largest cities, Dubai and Abu Dhabi, which draw millions of tourists each year. Dubai, a regional business hub known for its sleek skyscrapers, is home to the largest building in the world – the Burj Khalifa.

7 things you probably didn’t know about Dubai

From robot jockeys to the world’s largest international airport, here are some fascinating facts about Dubai, which will be the host city for the Global Future Council’s Annual Meeting on November 13-14, 2018. Non-Emiratis constitute 90 percent of the population. According to data from the Government of Dubai, more than 90 percent of the population in 2015 was from countries other than the United Arab Emirates. An estimated 2,446,675 people lived in the Emirate, according to population estimates.

Photograph courtesy of Roman Logov/Stocksnap.io This year, Dubai is expected to have more than six tourists for every inhabitant, according to predictions.

When you take into account the town’s modest population, this translates to more than six tourists for every one inhabitant.

The Thai capital is on track to receive more than 21 million tourists this year.

  • In 2014, Dubai International Airport surpassed London Heathrow to become the world’s busiest international hub.
  • 1 spot in the near future.
  • Image courtesy of Ashraf Mohammad of Reuters.
  • As stated by the Guinness World Records, the metro line is the world’s longest driverless metro line and is the longest metro line in the world.
  • Even while that may seem like a lot, the London Underground transports around 3.67 million passengers every day (or1.34 billion every year).
  • Camel racing with robot jockeys is a thing now.
  • However, it has recently taken on a more contemporary slant, thanks to the introduction of robot jockeys.

According to estimates from the Government of Dubai, men account for more than two-thirds of the city’s population.

The fact that Dubai is home to the world’s tallest structure is probably not a surprise to you.

Photo courtesy of REUTERS/Karim Sahib/Pool The Burj Khalifa is an 828-metre-tall structure.

Because of its height, Dubai’s prominent clerics recommended that Muslims who live in the building break their fast later during Ramadan in 2011, according to a 2011 report.

In the near future, though, an even higher structure will be constructed in Dubai.

According to reports, the structure would be “a notch higher” than the Burj Khalifa. Image courtesy of Bloomberg. The opinions stated in this article are solely those of the author and do not reflect those of the World Economic Forum as an organization.

Subscribe for updates

A weekly summary of what is currently on the global agenda.

22 Fascinating Dubai Facts (From Must-Know to Fun Trivia)

Looking for some fascinating facts about Dubai? Look no further. It is, without a doubt, a fascinating country, with so many distinct characteristics and a diverse range of customs and traditions. When you travel, one of the most enjoyable elements is the opportunity to learn about different cultures and ways of doing things. Even in this day and age, when the globe has become a global village with the same stores and restaurants everywhere you look, it never fails to astonish me that the resemblance only extends to the apparent surface of things.

  1. It is not because Arabs sip Starbucks coffee in Dubai and post pictures of their adventures on Facebook or Instagram using the latest iPhones that they have lost their sense of belonging to the Middle East.
  2. In no way, shape, or form!
  3. The fact that it is different does not suggest that it is better or worse.
  4. From serious Dubai facts, to local laws and customs, to astounding figures, we’ve compiled a list of the most interesting ones for you to read here.
  5. It’s important to realize that Dubai is modernizing and has lately amended a number of its rules that were previously considered strange in the perspective of a westerner.
  6. We have left the original information intact so that you can see what has been altered.

1. Dubai weekend is 2.5 days

Working hours and weekend schedules in Dubai have lately been revised in order to better match with those in the rest of the globe and on international marketplaces. Saturday and Sunday are now included in the weekend in Dubai’s new 2.5-day format: half a day from noon on Friday, plus Saturday and Sunday. Monday through Thursday, the official working hours are 7.30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m., and on Friday, the hours are 7.30 a.m. to 12 p.m. For a long time, a weekend in Dubai did not take place on Saturday and Sunday as it did in the western world.

Instead, Friday and Saturday were designated as weekends in Dubai. In order to better adapt to international financial markets, many Persian Gulf countries have lately modified their taxation structures, and Dubai will follow suit in January 2022.

2. Dubai was mostly a desert 20 years ago

When you take a look at how far the city has come, you can’t help but admire the vision of the city’s leaders. Beginning with Sheikh Rashid, who was concerned about the future of Dubai once the oil runs out, the movement spread. Sheikh Mohammed is credited for transforming Dubai into the worldwide metropolis that it is today. It seems like every time you go to Dubai, the city has altered a little bit more than the last. It seems like there is always something going on, whether it be new construction or tourist attractions, for example.

3. Dubai has the world’s tallest building

When it comes to everything in the United Arab Emirates, they like to be the best: the biggest, the tallest, and the wealthiest. The tallest structures in the world, the largest retail malls in the world, the most costly hotel rooms in the world, man-made islands. You name anything, and they’ve got it. Located in Dubai, the Burj Khalifa is the world’s tallest building at 828 meters (2,717 feet) and 163 stories, making it the world’s tallest structure. The Eiffel Tower in Paris, for contrast, stands 300 meters tall.

At 1.300 meters (4,265 feet) in height, it would surpass the Empire State Building as the highest man-made building ever completed.

However, just as the project in Saudi Arabia was halted, the project in Dubai was also halted.

For the time being, the Burj Khalifa will continue to be the world’s tallest structure.

4. There are 7 times more foreigners than locals in the United Arab Emirates

When it comes to anything in the United Arab Emirates, people like to be the best: the biggest, the tallest, and the wealthiest. The tallest skyscrapers in the world, the largest retail malls in the world, the most costly hotel rooms in the world, and man-made islands. The company possesses any item you can think of. At 828 m (2,717 ft) tall with 163 stories, the Burj Khalifa is the world’s tallest structure and the symbol of Dubai. In contrast, the height of the Eiffel Tower in Paris is 300 meters high.

When completed, it would be the highest man-made structure on the planet, standing at 1.300 meters (4,265 feet) in height!

Because of the disruption caused by the project in Saudi Arabia, the one in Dubai has also been halted.

Then came the pandemics, and the destiny of Dubai Creek Tower is still up in the air today. For the time being, the Burj Khalifa continues to be the world’s tallest structure. A view of the skyscrapers of Dubai, with the Burj Khalifa rising over all of them.

5. UAE population growth is one of the highest in the world

In 1965, the overall population of the United Arab Emirates was 150.000 people; in 2015, the population was 9.26 million people. The most significant increase occurred between 2003 and 2011, and the trend has been stabilizing in recent years. The population of the United Arab Emirates is expected to reach 9.99 million in 2022. Dubai is home to more than one-third of the total population of the United Arab Emirates (3.4 million people).

6. There are 2 times more men in UAE than women

The male-to-female ratio in Dubai is 7 to 3. This is mostly due to the fact that many international employees do not migrate with their family. The vast majority of them travel to the United Arab Emirates to work and earn money, leaving their families behind in their own countries. Men constitute 69 percent of the population of the United Arab Emirates, with women accounting for only 31 percent. Over two guys for every woman, to put it another way. It’s happening in a place where it’s not uncommon for a guy to have a number of wives.

7. Premarital sex used to be illegal in the Emirates

This is one of those Dubai facts that has sparked a lot of debate in the past, and for good reason. Fortunately, the regulations have recently been changed, and pre-marital sex is no longer considered criminal in Dubai. In the past, you were not permitted to share a hotel room in Dubai with a guy or a woman with whom you were not legally married – at least in principle. Close family members were exempt from this rule, therefore brothers and sisters were permitted to remain together. It didn’t matter what kind of relationship you were in or whether or not you lived with your partner at the same time.

For as long as nothing occurred, no one made a huge fuss about it, although some foreigners have gotten themselves into considerable problems for doing so.

All of the unmarried foreigners who live with their partners in Dubai can now rest easy knowing that no one will ever find out that they are not officially married.

8. Kissing in public is not done

Hugs and kisses in public are still frowned upon in the United Arab Emirates, and they may even be considered unlawful. It’s OK to hold hands with your husband or wife, but that’s about the extent of the relationship. Although Dubai is far more laid-back than the other emirates, it is far more straightforward to just follow the rules rather than pushing the bounds. Several disturbing messages have been sent to me, including one about an unmarried couple being imprisoned for public show of affection and another about females getting into difficulty after being raped.

Nonetheless, in the event that the unimaginable occurs in Dubai, it is preferable to call your embassy first before contacting the local authorities. Because of the severe laws in Dubai, it is best not to express too much affection in public.

9. There are no personal or income taxes in Dubai

Now you know why all of the expats are flocking to Dubai and why the city is growing! My husband (who works in the financial sector) has already expressed interest in relocating to Dubai. We would almost certainly be applying for a visa right now if it weren’t for the excessive heat of the summer.

10. In the recent past, Dubai had no standard street address system

Until recently, Dubai did not have a regular postal system in place at all. It was common for them to utilize Post Office Boxes, and the instructions on the letter or parcel would frequently contain directions on how to reach the location. Something along the lines of’second street to the right behind the great mosque, the third home with a white door on your left’ might suffice for now. This most likely explains why the majority of the postcards we sent from Dubai on our 2015 trip never made it to their intended recipients.

See also:  How Much Is Dubai Visa From Nigeria 2020? (Perfect answer)

However, it appears to have improved recently, as Dubai began issuing unique identifiers to all streets and structures in order to aid in their identification.

TIP: Here’s some advise for those who are traveling (apart from not wasting your money on cards and stamps).

In addition, all of the newly constructed hotels are springing up like mushrooms after a rain, making it impossible for any cab driver to keep up with the influx of new guests.

11. No alcohol consumption under 21 years of age

The drinking of alcoholic beverages is severely regulated in the United Arab Emirates. In the past, only international visitors or foreign residents who had obtained a special alcohol license were permitted to purchase and drink alcoholic beverages in Dubai. Fortunately, this is one of the laws that has lately been loosened. Despite the fact that alcohol can still only be consumed privately or in licensed public areas, residents no longer require a special license to do so. The main restriction now is that people under the age of 21 are not permitted to purchase or consume alcoholic beverages in Dubai.

Alcoholic beverages are offered at licensed hotels and nightclubs in Dubai, although it is not permitted to consume alcohol (or be under the influence of alcohol) in public places.

12. Dancing in public is considered provocative and is a big no-no

Who would do anything like that in Dubai, dancing on the streets? Seriously. I did it without realizing it, and the look on the face of a passing local told it all. It wasn’t that I was dancing, but it was New Year’s Eve and I was strolling by a restaurant with live music when I decided to playfully ‘dance’ with my 5-year-old kid.

After that, I simply had to look it up on the internet, and it turns out that dancing in public is not permitted in Dubai. So now you’re up to speed.

13. Dubai police has the coolest cars

Ferrari FF and Lamborghini Aventador are among the luxury vehicles used by Dubai police. Each of them was between 400 and 500 thousand dollars. They even have an Aston Martin One-77 on the premises (1.79 million USD). Photograph by slava296/Depositphotos.com of a luxurious police cruiser in Dubai.

14. They keep on building skyscrapers

In Dubai, at least ten buildings are constructed each year. 2007 was a record-breaking year, with 41 structures higher than 100 meters built in a single calendar year. Dubai, along with cities such as Hong Kong and New York, is one of the world’s top-5 cities with the greatest number of skyscrapers, ranking third overall. In recent years, several too ambitious projects, such as the Meydan One Complex (which included the world’s largest residential skyscraper, the Dubai One Tower, at 771m (2,333ft), the world’s longest indoor ski arena, and other features), have been shelved.

15. Number plates matter

Many wealthy individuals in Dubai have a liking for automobiles, particularly luxury automobiles. The number plate on your automobile reveals how significant (=rich) you are in the community. The number plate with the fewest digits is the one that is most sought for. When plate No. 1 was auctioned off in 2008, it brought in $14.5 million USD.

16. They have ATMs for gold

Some ATMs in Dubai are equipped to disburse gold rather than money. Dubai is responsible for around 40% of all physical gold trading in the globe. The Dubai Gold Souk is one of the greatest places to buy gold in Dubai, and it is open seven days a week. Dubai Gold Souk is a gold market in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

17. They keep on building new hotels

In Dubai, there were 544 hotels that were open for business in 2019. In Dubai, there are now about 100,700 hotel rooms available. To give you a sense of how things used to be, there were just 64,000 hotel rooms only three years before that.

18. No food on the metro

In Dubai, you can be fined if you consume food or drink in a metro station.

19. They use robot jockeys for camel races

Middle Easterners like watching camel races, which are quite popular in the region. Due to the size of the camels, only youngsters are permitted to compete in the races. The sport has unfortunately been associated with a large number of child trafficking and abuse cases in the past, which has prompted several governments to ban it entirely. Qatar has come up with a solution to the problem. The sport of camel racing, which continues to be a multimillion-dollar enterprise in the region, is now dominated by remote-controlled child-sized robots.

20. They consume lots of water

Middle Easterners like watching camel races, which are quite popular there. Only youngsters are permitted to participate in the camel races due to the size of the animals. The sport has unfortunately been associated with a large number of child trafficking and abuse cases in the past, which has prompted various governments to outlaw it.

An answer was provided by Qatar. Camel racing, which is still a multimillion-dollar sport in the region, is now conducted using remote-controlled child-sized robots. For camel racing in the United Arab Emirates, robot jockeys are now being deployed.

21. Dubai bathrooms have water hoses

Every toilet in Dubai is equipped with a water hose, yet 98 percent of the international expatriates who live in the city are completely unaware of what it is for. When you enter a toilet, the water is streaming down the walls and dripping from the ceiling, yet the person who just left is entirely dry. This is called a “wet” toilet. When you go to the toilet, you stand there and wonder what on earth they have been doing in there, and you decide to search for another toilet instead. The vast majority of Muslim nations clean themselves using a toilet hose.

If you find yourself in a less-than-modern toilet in the Middle East, you’ll quickly learn to appreciate the convenience of the water hose.

22. They love luxurycrazy prestigious projects

Dubai is home to a large number of wealthy individuals, who may be found everywhere. Luxury automobiles and boats draw a great deal of attention, and individuals enjoy being seen. Sheikh Mohammed, the ruler of Dubai, is the owner of the third-largest yacht in the world, the Dubai World Yacht. The yacht, dubbed MY Dubai, is 162 meters (531 feet) in length and costs 400 million dollars. It can accommodate up to 115 people! Dubai is home to numerous prominent projects that, at first glance, appear to be too good to be true, but are in fact genuine.

Despite this, they manage to pull it off again and time again.

They certainly have leaders that dream big and work hard to make their dreams a reality!

Some useful facts about Dubai

The following are some other intriguing Dubai facts that you may find interesting in addition to the above-mentioned amusing and bizarre facts about Dubai:

  • Dubai’s official language is Arabic, and the official religion is Islam. Dubai is located in the United Arab Emirates. The dirham (AED) is the currency of Dubai, which is the currency of the United Arab Emirates. GMT+4 is the time zone in question. In Dubai, it seldom, if ever, rains. Typically, only a few drops and 15-30 days a year are required
  • The greatest time to visit Dubai is during the colder months of November to April, when the weather is pleasant. Summer temperatures frequently approach 40 degrees Celsius (103 degrees Fahrenheit), and temperatures remain around 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit) even during the night.

ALSO READ: How Expensive Is Dubai Real Estate? More information on Dubai may be found at: What to dress is as follows: Dubai Visitors’ Clothing Recommendations Getting Around in Dubai: A Guide to Public Transportation in Dubai Dubai on a shoestring budget: Experiences in Dubai for Free or at a Low Cost Tours: The Most Exciting Tours in Dubai Attractions in Dubai for the Entire Family: Things to Do in Dubai for the Entire Family How to Plan a Stopover in Dubai on a Short Trip If you found this page to be valuable, please remember to bookmark it and share it with your social media contacts.

Are you a member of Pinterest?

10 surprising things you probably didn’t know about Dubai

Because Emiratis like to stay to themselves and avoid the main tourist areas, it’s doubtful that you’ll strike up a conversation with them on the beach – in fact, most visitors only come into contact with one Emirati during their vacation: when they get their passport stamped at the airport. Despite the fact that border control is nearly completely staffed by Emiratis (in fact, most bureaucratic positions are designated for “nationals”), this is not the best location to strike up a chat about local life.

Expats outnumber Emirati natives inDubai by a factor of nearly six to one, according to official figures. The Indian, Bangladeshi, Pakistani, Asian, and Western populations constitute the vast bulk of the population.

2. It’s not as tall as you think

According to development statistics fromemporis.com, Dubai now has 571 finished skyscrapers, which is a drop in the bucket compared to Hong Kong’s 1,474 and New York’s 1,022 skyscrapers respectively. The city is actually home to the world’s tallest building (the Burj Khalifa, which will be discussed further later), which rises to an impressive 828 metres in height. In 2006, a fifth of the world’s cranes were employed on Dubai construction projects, but those days are past – since the global financial crisis of 2008, the city’s brisk development pace has slowed significantly.

Moreover, Dubai no longer holds the title of having the world’s tallest residential skyscraper: its Princess Tower (413 metres, in Dubai Marina) was surpassed in 2014 by New York’s 432 Park Avenue (426 metres), which was in turn surpassed by two other New York buildings, the tallest of which is now the 472 metre Central Park Tower.

3. Its police cars are epic

Because there are so many supercars on Dubai’s roadways, its law enforcement officers couldn’t simply pootle around in Fords like the British police. They switch to Lamborghinis, Ferraris, and Bentleys, of course, in order to keep up with the crims’ pace. The Dubai police department can get from zero to sixty in less than three seconds, depending on the situation. Image courtesy of getty In December 2013, they added a McLaren to their fleet, and in 2014, they acquired a Bugatti Veyron. The Lamborghini Aventador used by the police department is powered by a mid-mounted V12 engine that produces 691 horsepower and can accelerate from zero to sixty in less than three seconds.

The company’s BMW i8 makes mincemeat of fleeing criminals, traveling from zero to sixty in 4.2 seconds.

If you ask respectfully, they might be willing to perform Scotland the Brave for you.

4. It owes a lot to Abu Dhabi

The Burj Khalifa, the world’s tallest building, towers over the city of Dubai – yet it could not have been built without the financial assistance of Abu Dhabi, Dubai’s neighboring emirate, which provided the funds.

  • Why you’re incorrect about Dubai
  • What to do in Dubai on your second visit
  • Why you’re wrong about Dubai

The skyscraper was formerly known as Burj Dubai (meaning “Dubai Tower”) until just before it opened its doors in 2010, but it was renamed in honor of Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahayan, the Emir of Abu Dhabi and President of the United Arab Emirates, shortly before it opened. After being bailed out by Sheikh Khalifa to the tune of £6.13 billion, Dubai lavished its appreciation on Sheikh Khalifa in a manner befitting the city’s status as a global financial center.

5. It should have had a Steven Gerrard Tower

Although Dubai has become famous for its architectural follies (man-made islands, world-record breaking structures, and so on), there are numerous additional outrageous projects that have never made it past the design stage. It was suggested to build International Chess City (a cluster of 32 towers in black and white that were supposed to appear like chess pieces), but it was ultimately rejected.

A same tragedy befell the Steven Gerrard Tower in the same year. In addition, the Dynamic Tower, whose floors were supposed to rotate (yikes), was never constructed. It’s possible that Dubai’s skyline might have been much more bizarre. Image courtesy of krivinis – Fotolia

6. The locals are rich, but forgetful

Although Dubai has become famous for its architectural follies (man-made islands, world-record breaking structures, and so on), there are numerous additional outrageous projects that have never made it past the design phase. Despite being suggested, the project, which would have included a cluster of 32 black and white towers meant to resemble chess pieces, did not make the cut. A same tragedy befell the Steven Gerrard Tower. It was also never completed, as was the Dynamic Tower, whose floors were intended to rotate (yikes).

Fotolia user krivinis contributed to this post.

7. There are far more men than women

Although Dubai has become famous for its architectural follies (man-made islands, world-record breaking structures, and so on), there are numerous additional crazy projects that have never made it past the drawing board. There was a proposal for International Chess City (a cluster of 32 black and white towers made to appear like chess pieces), but it did not make the final cut. A same tragedy befell the Steven Gerrard Tower in Liverpool. It was also never completed, as was the Dynamic Tower, whose floors were supposed to rotate (yikes).

Photograph courtesy of krivinis – Fotolia

8. Its Crown Prince is an action man

Affectionately known as Fazza by his pals, the son of Dubai’s ruler, Hamdan bin Mohammed Al Maktoum – is the attractive and media-friendly poster child for the royal family. A well-known figure in the expat and national communities alike, he enjoys several activities such as skydiving, falconry, fishing and diving among his many interests. Besides poetry, he also produces works in the ancient Nabati style of the region, which goes back to the 16th century. His Instagram account isn’t quite the bling-bling extravaganza you might expect from an Emirati prince.

Naaw.

9. It was built on pearl diving

Before it became a tourist destination, Dubai made its money from oil. But what happened before oil? The emirate’s principal industries were fishing, farming, and pearl diving, among others. The Pearl Diving Dhows (traditional sailing boats) were based in Dubai Creek in the early twentieth century, with over 7,000 sailors on board, and there were 300 of them. Men would stay at sea from mid-May to early September, diving up to 14 hours each day, while women would be at home caring for their children and other family members Dives were typically 10 metres deep; divers would reach the seafloor with the use of a noseclip and a weight placed around their waist before hauling themselves up on a rope to the surface.

See also:  How Long Is The Flight From Dubai To Australia? (Best solution)

10. You can buy pretty much anything from a vending machine

Oil was Dubai’s primary source of revenue prior to tourism. Prior to oil, however, The emirate’s principal industries included fishing, farming, and pearl diving. In the early twentieth century, there were 300 pearl diving dhows (traditional sailing boats) based in Dubai Creek, with a total of nearly 7,000 seamen on board, according to historical records. Men would remain at sea from mid-May to early September, diving up to 14 hours each day, while women would stay at home caring for their children and grandchildren.

The usual dive would be 10 metres deep, and divers would reach the bottom with the use of a noseclip and a weight strapped around their waist before hauling themselves back up on a rope. A typical day would consist of around 50 dives.

10 surprising things you didn’t know about Dubai

Dubai holds a slew of global records, and the city is constantly breaking them. From the world’s tallest structure to a seven-star hotel, there’s something for everyone. However, here are some interesting facts about Dubai that you may not have known.

1.It’s a very young city

In the early 1700s, Dubai was a modest fishing and pearl-diving community with a population of less than 1,000 people. By the end of the 18th century, the population had grown to around 1,200 persons. Fast forward to now, when the city of Dubai has a population of 3.3 million people, Prior to the discovery of oil, pearls and gold were highly sought-after trading commodities among traders. In order to understand about Dubai and the Emirati civilisation, you should visit the souks and the Dubai Museum.

2.It’s a birder’s paradise

As a modest fishing and pearl-diving community in the early 1700s, Dubai has since grown into a global business. Around 1,200 people were living in the area at the end of the 18th century. Take a look at Dubai now, where a population of 3.3 million people resides there. When oil was discovered, pearls and gold were highly sought-after commercial commodities. Take a tour of the souks and Dubai Museum to discover more about Dubai and the Emirati way of life.

3.Its tallest building is based on a flower

The Burj Khalifa, with its 2,716-foot height, is the world’s tallest structure and hence need no introduction. This edifice, which is a landmark in the Dubai skyline, should be on everyone’s “wish list” while visiting the city. Take a ride to the 148th story to see a bird’s eye view of the city below, or relax in the lounge with a beverage on the 123rd floor. A interesting fact about Dubai is that the design of the structure is based on a native desert flower, the hymenocallis, commonly known as the spider lily, which can be found in the area.

4.Its cuisine is truly cosmopolitan

Because Dubai has been a commercial hub for centuries, food from all over the world has affected the cuisine of the city. In addition to traditional Arabic cuisine, you’ll discover spices from India, products from Persia, and influences from the eastern Mediterranean region. Participate in a culinary tour to sample various cuisines and learn interesting foodie tidbits about Dubai. Take part in a traditional Emirati breakfast experience for a really genuine start to the day. For those looking for an exciting and romantic evening, a Bedouin tent meal is the genuine deal.

5.Its art scene is flourishing

Art Dubai, an annual international art fair, brings together artists from all over the world, including the Middle East, South East Asia, Africa, Latin America, and Australasia. This cutting-edge exhibition is devoted to modern artworks that have a connection to cultural heritage. Travel to theDubai Design District to browse around its galleries and boutiques, or take a personal gallery tour along Alserkal Avenue to discover what’s new and exciting in the city.

6.It has robots as jockeys

Camels are used in camel racing, which is one of the most popular activities in Dubai.

Tiny robots are being utilized as jockeys on camels to avoid youngsters from being exploited for their small stature when riding and racing the camels. A camel riding excursion in the desert is an option even if you aren’t interested in racing. Alternatively, you could go dune bashing!

7. It has a museum dedicated to coffee

Coffee enthusiasts require their daily cup of the good stuff to get them through the day, and the Arabic culture more than meets that requirement. See coffee antiques from all around the globe and learn about the history of this favorite beverage by visiting the Coffee Museum in New York City. Consider taking part in a Bedouin coffee ritual to get a flavor of tradition.

8. It has a UNESCO World Heritage Site

Get away from the allure of Dubai’s glitz and glam and explore the ancient Dubai Creek neighborhood. Walk through the narrow alleyways of the Al Fahidi Historical Neighbourhood and discover museums, art galleries, and delicious local cuisine along the route. You may even take a traditional abra boat ride along the river to see all the area has to offer. Take a tour of this intriguing region with a local guide to learn interesting things about Dubai.

9. It has a set of islands shaped like a palm tree.

The Palm in Dubai is the world’s biggest artificial archipelago and is home to the world’s most expensive real estate. Only sand and rocks were used in the construction of these man-made islands. The Hajar Mountains provided 7 million tons of rock and approximately 3 billion cubic feet of sand from the seafloor, which was used in the construction. A exciting tandem skydiving adventure or a thrilling jet ski trip are also excellent ways to get to know the area better.

10. It has the world’s longest automated metro line

Make a big deal of the fact that you’ve gone on the world’s longest driverless metro line. When you combine the red line (32.37 miles) with the green line (13.98 miles), you have a Guinness World Record in your possession. On this culinary tour, you’ll take the subway to travel from one great sampling stop to the next, which will take around an hour.

Comments

Dubai, often called Dubayy, is the capital and most populous emirate of the United Arab Emirates (formerly Trucial States or Trucial Oman). It is the second most populated and second biggest state in the federation (with an area of 1,510 square miles), and it is generally rectangular in shape, with a frontage on the Persian Gulf of around 45 miles (72 kilometers). The capital of the emirate, which is commonly known as Dubai, is the largest city in the federation. The city is situated on the banks of a tiny stream in the state’s northeastern region.

  1. Dubai is bordered on the south and west by the emirate of Abu Dhabi, and on the east and northeast by the emirate of Sharjah.
  2. Explore the magnificent city of Dubai, which is the world’s fastest-growing metropolis.
  3. Contunico is a trademark of ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz.
  4. The establishment of Dubai Town has been documented from 1799.
  5. In that year, a group of l B Falsah clansmen from the Ban Ys confederation, primarily pearl fishermen, left Abu Dhabi in the midst of a rivalry dispute and marched into Dubai town, where they were met with little opposition.
  6. However, Dubai’s new rulers were able to maintain their independence by pitting the rulers of Abu Dhabi and the Qawsim (Al Qasim), who controlled the area just north of the Emirate, against each other.
  7. The emirate, along with the rest of the original Trucial States, agreed a maritime truce with Britain in 1835, which was later replaced by the Perpetual Maritime Truce in 1853.

When the United Kingdom withdrew from the Persian Gulf in 1971, Dubai was a significant founding member of the United Arab Emirates and remained so till now.

The United Arab Emirates.the emirate of Dubai (Dubayy), which is one of the region’s most important economic and financial centers, and is home to hundreds of thousands of people.

The importance of airlines in the development of Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Contunico is a trademark of ZDF Enterprises GmbH, Mainz.

For a long time, the Maktoumsheikhs of Dubai, in contrast to the majority of their neighbours, encouraged trade and business; Dubai was an important port by the turn of the twentieth century.

Since the early 2000s, Dubai has risen to become the region’s primary port for the importation of Western manufactured goods.

Following the depreciation of the Gulf rupee in 1966, Dubai joined the republic of Qatar, which established a new monetary unit, the riyal, in 1967.

The emirate allows for unrestricted gold trading, and there is a thriving smuggling trade in gold ingots to India, where gold imports are strictly prohibited.

There is a controversy about special taxicabs in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, that are driven solely by women and transport exclusively female customers.

View all of the videos related to this topic.

By the 1970s, three 20-story undersea tanks, each with a capacity of 500,000 barrels, had been constructed on the seabed near the site.

Although Dubai’s estimated oil reserves are less than one-twentieth of those of its neighbor Abu Dhabi, oil money mixed with trading riches has resulted in the state being extremely affluent.

A series of phased expansions of the smelter’s facilities have resulted in a significant rise in aluminum output since the late 1980s, according to the company.

Dubai, United Arab Emirates, is experiencing a development boom, as shown in this overview.

View all of the videos related to this topic.

After a deepwater port named after the previous emir was constructed in 1972, a supertanker dry dock was built in 1979.

To encourage industrial investment, the Jebel Ali port and industrial center was designated a free-trade zone in the early 1980s.

The Dubai Ports Authority, which was established specifically for the purpose of supervising Port Rashid and Jebel Ali, assumed control of the project in the early 1990s.

In September 2009, the first section of Dubai’s driverless rapid transit metro line, which was the first of its kind in the gulf area, was put into service.

Water taxis in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, are the subject of this topic.

View all of the videos related to this topic.

Construction of the Burj Dubai skyscraper (“Dubai Tower”), as it was then known, continued despite the fact that it had been halted due to strikes by the city’s huge population of expatriate laborers at the time.

Investment in the tower and numerous other extravagant projects, on the other hand, necessitated significant borrowing, and as a result of the escalation of the global financial crisis in the preceding years, the emirate’s economy was plagued by massive debt and large quantities of unsold real estate.

The population of the emirate is estimated to be 3,411,200 in 2020. Those in charge of editing the Encyclopaedia Britannica Adam Zeidan was the author of the most recent revision and update to this article.

Cultural Differences in Dubai You Need to Know About

Located in the United Arab Emirates, Dubai (sometimes written Dubayy) is an emirate (formerly Trucial States or Trucial Oman). Approximately 45 miles (72 kilometers) of coastline on the Persian Gulf defines this state, which is the second most populated and second biggest in the federation (with an area of 1,510 square miles). In addition to being named Dubai, the emirate’s capital is also known as Dubai. The city is situated on the banks of a tiny stream in the state’s northeastern region.

  • Surrounded on the south and west by the emirate of Abu Dhabi, as well as the eastern and northern emirates of Sharjah and Abu Dhabi, Dubai is a global financial center.
  • Find out what it’s like to live in Dubai, which is the world’s fastest-growing metropolis.
  • The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico.
  • From the year 1799, the town of Dubai has been known as the settlement of Dubai.
  • After a conflict with the Ban Ys confederation, a group of l B Falsah clansmen from the Ban Ys confederation, who were primarily pearl fishermen, left Abu Dhabi and marched into Dubai town, where they were met with little opposition.
  • However, Dubai’s new rulers were able to maintain their independence by pitting the rulers of Abu Dhabi and the Qawsim (Al Qasim), who controlled the area just north of the Emirate, against each other.
  • A maritime truce with Great Britain was signed in 1835, and a Perpetual Maritime Truce was signed with the emirate in 1853, both of which were signed together with the other founding Trucial States.

As a key founding member of the United Arab Emirates after Britain ultimately withdrew from the Persian Gulf in 1971, Dubai played an important role in the country’s demise.

Learn about the importance of Dubai’s aviation sector to the development of the city in this informative video series.

The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico.

While most of its neighbors have long favored trade and business, the Maktoums of Dubai were instrumental in establishing Dubai as a major port at the turn of the twentieth century.

As in recent years, Dubai has surpassed all other regional ports in terms of the importation of Western manufactured goods.

Dubai joined Qatar in 1966, and together they established a new monetary unit called the riyal, following the depreciation of the Gulf rupee.

Because of the emirate’s unfettered gold commerce, there is a thriving smuggling traffic in gold ingots to India, where gold imports are strictly regulated.

There is a controversy about special taxicabs in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, that are driven solely by women and carry exclusively female passengers.

See also:  What Airlines Fly Out Of Dubai? (Question)

This page contains a number of videos.

By the 1970s, three 20-story undersea tanks, each with a capacity of 500,000 barrels, had been built on the seabed near the site.

Even though Dubai’s estimated oil reserves are less than a tenth of those of its neighbor Abu Dhabi, oil money mixed with trading riches has resulted in the state being extremely wealthy.

A series of phased expansions of the smelter’s facilities have resulted in a significant rise in aluminum production since the late 1980s.

Dubai City, Dubai, United Arab Emirates: An overview of the construction boom The ZDF Enterprises GmbH in Mainz is the company that created Contunico.

Tourism, transportation, and industry are among the many development and building projects that Dubai has prioritized in the past year.

To encourage industrial investment, the Jebel Ali port and industrial center was designated a free-trade zone in the early 1980s.

The Dubai Ports Authority, which was established specifically for the purpose of supervising Port Rashid and Jebel Ali, took over the project in the early 1990s.

Emirate Airlines, the official airline of the United Arab Emirates, was founded by the Dubai government in the mid-1980s and serves the region.

Embark on a journey in an anabra, a water taxi in Dubai Water taxis in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, are the subject of a conversation.

This page contains a number of videos.

Construction of the Burj Dubai skyscraper (“Dubai Tower”), as it was then known, continued despite the fact that it had been halted by strikes by the city’s vast population of foreign workers.

In order to finance the construction of the tower and a variety of other extravagant projects, the emirate had to borrow heavily, and as a result of the escalation of the global financial crisis in recent years, its economy was burdened with huge amounts of debt and large amounts of unsold real estate.

Emirates have a population of 3,411,200 people (as of 2020). In the Encyclopaedia Britannica, the editors write about: Most recently, Adam Zeidan made revisions and updates to this article.

Cultural Differences in Clothing

For many visitors to Dubai, this is a major cause of anxiety and frustration. We didn’t know what we were going to bring with us or what we were going to wear until the day before! Traditional hijab or abaya are frequently worn by women in the area, particularly at mosques. The majority of visitors, however, dress in “regular” attire; nonetheless, be aware that exposing clothing is frowned upon and, in certain situations, even banned! What precisely are “revealing” garments, and how do they work?

  1. Make sure your jeans reach at least your knees while you’re in public settings, and that your shoulders are covered at all times.
  2. It is possible to be a little more relaxed at resorts and hotels, on the beach, and in the desert.
  3. Of course, sunbathing without a shirt on is prohibited and considered quite impolite!
  4. That implies ladies should wear slacks or a skirt that covers their ankles, long sleeves, and a headscarf.
  5. Wearing a traditional hijab or abaya may be simple and straightforward.
  6. There is usually a headscarf or hijab or abaya available for rent at the mosque.

Mosques in Dubai

In Dubai, there are innumerable mosques, some of which are enormous and others which are little and charming. One or two prayer sessions are held daily, and the broadcasts of these services may be heard in every section of the city. When you first start out, it may seem strange, but you will grow used to it very fast. Please keep in mind that certain sessions are scheduled for extremely early in the morning, which may cause you to wake up. Perhaps you’d wish to keep that in mind when making your hotel reservations.

It is thus advised to avoid visiting mosques on Fridays because prayer services are frequently held during that day.

In Dubai, there are two churches: St.

Homosexuality and showing affection in public

Homosexuality is strictly prohibited across the Middle East, and those who do so face harsh penalties. Because of this, it may be preferable to travel to a different location while you are homosexual.

It is also considered impolite for heterosexual individuals to express affection in public. Kissing is even completely prohibited, and doing so might result in you being imprisoned! Holding hands and embracing, on the other hand, are deemed illegal.

Ramadan

Without a doubt, Ramadan has a significant impact on Dubai’s culture, and this is plainly seen in the city’s everyday life. Most restaurants and pubs are closed throughout the day during this period, and it is very hard to find a place to dine during this time period. During Ramadan, it is also prohibited to consume food, drink, or smoke in public places! Basically, everything that is ingested by mouth is not permitted to be consumed. Please abide by this throughout the daytime hours! It is entirely up to you whether or not you choose to travel to Dubai during Ramadan.

During Ramadan, Dubai may even be a little more affordable!

Cultural Differences for Women in Dubai

Women may travel freely in Dubai since it is a highly safe country. Wearing a headscarf in public is not required for women, although it is required for women entering mosques. Women in Dubai enjoy a far more free way of life than women in other Middle Eastern nations. This implies that women may simply drive, work, and participate in other activities in this country. When speaking with a local, it is advised that you wait for a hand to be extended to you for a handshake before proceeding. This is due to the fact that some devout Muslims would prefer not to shake hands with a woman.

Women are frequently given priority at government buildings, which include distinct lines for them!

It is important to note that guys are not permitted to enter!

Alcohol

Officially, alcoholic beverages are prohibited in Dubai. It is only permitted in locations that have been sanctioned by the sheikh. Despite this, the weather in Dubai is not too horrible. It is mostly the other Emirates where they are considerably tighter in their regulations. For example, you may even bring alcohol into Dubai with you: each individual is allowed to bring in 4 liters. Alcohol, on the other hand, is not accessible in shops or supermarkets. Additionally, you must acquire a license in order to serve alcohol in your own house.

Even on trips, it is frequently feasible to obtain alcoholic beverages.

You might face severe consequences if you do this!

Arabic food

In Dubai, you may choose from a wide range of cuisines from across the world. But what really is authentic Arabic cuisine? Traditionally, Arab cuisine has made extensive use of dried fruit, lentils, and, most notably, a wide variety of spices! Hence, a visit to the spice market in Deira is highly recommended! It is possible to find every spice you can think at that location! Shoarma is the most well-known dish that is associated with Arab culture. This may be found on practically every street corner in almost every city.

Other traditional foods include Taboulleh (a cereal dish with tomato, onion, parsley, and mint) and, of course, Humus (a dip made from ground chickpeas).

There are a plethora of restaurants where you may sample authentic Arabic cuisine. You may discover a variety of food booths on the streets, as well as traditional Arabic eateries. Particularly prevalent in older neighborhoods like as Deira and Bur Dubai are these types of establishments.

Sisha (water pipe)

It goes without saying that a water pipe is also a part of the Arabic culture! You will discover that they have excellent fruit flavors and a very robust taste when you arrive in this country. It’s fun to give it a shot, and it’s also a comfortable, communal pastime. There are several locations where you may experience the water pipe in Dubai, and it is really popular. They may be seen on practically every corner of the street (next to the shoarma:P).

Sheikh

Mohammed bin Rasjid Al Maktoem is the sheikh of Dubai at the moment. The sheikh is a highly powerful individual. He is seen as someone who possesses considerable power, wealth, and oil. But what exactly is a sheikh in this context? A sheikh is just a strong individual who serves as the ruler of an emirate or kingdom. When you demonstrate strong leadership qualities that are related to the Islamic religion, you can advance to the position of sheikh. The people of Dubai have a great deal of regard for the sheikh, and you can see posters of him all around the city, which is a testament to this.

Other typical things

As well as camels, there are many other items associated with the Arabic culture, such as henna tattoos, belly dancers, eating with a pillow on the ground while watching television, and magnificent lights. You can locate these activities all across the city, so there are plenty of opportunities to participate in one or more of them. But are you truly interested in going through this with everyone else? Then you should definitely consider going on a desert safari! You will be taken to a desert camp where you will be able to learn about and experience Arabic culture.

Weekend

Weekends in Dubai are held on different days than they are in the rest of the globe. It has been held on Friday and Saturday since 2006. This has evolved as a middle ground between the Muslim holy Friday and the western Sat-Sun weekend, according to the Islamic calendar. As a result, be aware that some establishments may be closed on Friday (although this will not be the case in most places in Dubai).

Important public holidays

The majority of Islamic public holidays are observed in Dubai. The most significant are as follows:

  • Eid al Fitr (Sugar Festival – end of Ramadan)
  • Eid al Adha (Sacrifice Feast)
  • Prophet’s birthday
  • Islamic new year (varies yearly – depending on the phase of the moon)
  • Prophet’s birthday National Day is celebrated on December 2nd, and New Year’s Day is celebrated on January 1st.

Where to Stay

All of the hotels in Dubai may be found right here. Check out all of our previous blogs on Dubai right here!

Pin it for later⇟

Did you like reading this article? More exclusive material, travel advice, and freebies can be found in our newsletter, which you can subscribe to here:

Where Is Dubai? Facts, Geography, and History

Dubai, the capital of the United Arab Emirates, is depicted on this map. Kallie Szczepanski is a young woman from Poland. The most recent update was made on October 19, 2019. In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Dubai (also known as Dubayy) is a city on the Persian Gulf that serves as the capital. Its southern border is with Abu Dhabi, its northern border with Sharjah, and its southern border with Oman. Dubai is surrounded by the Arabian Desert on three sides. In 2018, the city’s population surpassed 2 million people.

Oil was found off the coast of Dubai in 1966, and despite the fact that the emirate has less oil than its neighbor Abu Dhabi, oil profits, combined with other economic activities such as aluminum, have helped to make the emirate wealthy.

Real estate, financial services, international trade through its port, and tourism are among the other businesses of the city.

Capital and Major Cities

Dubai is the name of the emirate’s capital and largest city, which is also where 90 percent of the emirate’s population resides, in and around the city. According to population estimates for 2019, the country’s population was 2.8 million, having increased by more than 230,000 people in the previous year. More than 4 million people live there during the daytime, which includes those who aren’t citizens or residents.

Area and Land Expansion

The metropolitan region around the city encompasses over 1,500 square miles (3,885 square kilometers), with the city proper being approximately 15.5 square miles (25 square kilometers) (35 sq km). In addition to the development of man-made islands in the gulf, which will be known as Marsa Al Arab, as well as some construction in the desert areas, Dubai’s land area is being expanded. The newest manufactured islands, which will be completed in 2017, will cover 4 million square feet (.14 square miles,.37 square kilometers) and will extend the city’s shoreline by 1.5 miles (2.4 kilometers).

These new man-made islands do not represent the first time that man-made islands have been added to the city’s shoreline.

Additionally, 300 private islands (dubbed “The World”) were constructed beginning in 2003 and sold to developers or affluent individuals for the purpose of building private luxury residences (or many mansions on a single island) and resorts.

Despite the fact that the majority of the 300 islands in the vicinity are undeveloped, construction in the area known as The Heart of Europe resumed in 2016 after having been suspended in 2008 during the global recession.

History of Dubai

The first recorded mention of Dubai as a city is found in the geographer Abu Abdullah al-(1014–1094) Bakri’s “Book of Geography,” which was published in 1095. When it was recognized as a hub of commerce and pearling in the Middle Ages, it was a major port city. The sheiks who governed Dubai struck a contract with the British in 1892, according to which the United Kingdom committed to “defend” Dubai from the Ottoman Empire for a period of time. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, Dubai’s pearl business came to a grinding halt.

The United Arab Emirates were formed in 1971 when Dubai combined with six other emirates to establish the United Arab Emirates.

Foreign investors were forced to evacuate Dubai during the first Gulf War in 1990 as a result of the military and political unrest in the region.

In addition to fossil resources, Dubai’s economy is now diversified, relying on real estate and construction, transportation exports, and financial services, among other things, to support itself.

It is home to the world’s largest mall, which is only one of more than 70 luxury retail malls in the city. One of the most notable features of the Mall of the Emirates is Ski Dubai, which is the only indoor ski slope in the Middle East.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *