What Body Of Water Is Dubai On? (Solution)

The emirate of Dubai is located on the southeast coast of the Persian Gulf and is one of the seven emirates that make up the country.

Is there a body of water in Dubai?

Dubai lies directly within the Arabian Desert. Dubai has no natural river bodies or oases; however, Dubai does have a natural inlet, Dubai Creek, which has been dredged to make it deep enough for large vessels to pass through.

What water is in Dubai?

Water Sources In Dubai The primary source of freshwater in Dubai is desalinated seawater from the Arabian Gulf. It accounts for 89.9% of the city’s water supply needs. The remainder of the water demand is mainly serviced by underground water.

Are there sharks in Dubai?

But according to local experts, there is no reason to fear sharks lurking off the UAE’s coast. Whale sharks, which eat plankton and don’t attack humans, are one of the 29 different kinds of species calling the waters off Dubai home. They include hammerhead, white cheek, tiger and gray reef sharks.

Does Dubai have beaches?

With miles of coastline, Dubai’s beaches range from super simple (just sun, sand and sea) to ultra-luxury. Most public beaches have been built up in recent years, meaning you can expect to find cabanas for changing, spots to grab food and rental water sports equipment.

Is Dubai running out of water?

Dubai: For every drop of water that goes to waste from UAE taps, much is at stake for this generation and the coming ones, such as having no groundwater – at all – to be circulated through taps by 2030.

Where does UAE get fresh water?

Very few countries have freshwater supplies that are so scarce and fragile as the UAE’s. We have no permanent rivers or natural lakes. Instead, we rely heavily on rainwater falling in the Hajar Mountains – creating year-round water in the wadis and underwater gorges.

Is Dubai sea water clean?

The Blue Flag scheme has recognised beaches throughout the city for their clean water quality and rubbish-free stretches of sand. Blue Flags have recently been granted to public beaches along Jumeirah and popular spot Kite Beach along Umm Suqeim.

Do you get snakes in Dubai?

There are several types of snakes that live in Dubai, which may also be found across the UAE both on land and sea. Arabian Gulf Sea Snake. Arabian Horned Viper. Arabian Sand Boa.

Are there sea snakes in Dubai?

Dubai is home to at least 7 species of sea snakes, abundant in the warm, shallow Arabian Gulf. Some are the Arabian Gulf Sea Snake, Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake, Short Sea Snake & an unidentified species of the genus Hydrophis. They are generally not aggressive, but will attack if provoked.

Is it safe to swim in Dubai?

Conclusion. Most of the Dubai beaches owns a blue flag award which is highly safe to swim. Whilst on many other beaches you will find lifeguards who will guide you to ensure the safety of swimming.

How does Dubai get water?

There are two main sources for water in the UAE: Ground water and desalinated sea water. Close to 99% of potable drinking water in Dubai comes from its desalination plants. The desalination plants process sea water to make them usable.

Is Dubai on the red list?

Travel to Dubai has been off limits for most of 2021 as the United Arab Emirates was added to the red list back in January to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

Can you drink alcohol in Dubai?

Drinking Is A-OK, in the Right Places Tourists are permitted to drink in licensed restaurants, hotels and bars attached to licensed hotels. It is unacceptable and punishable to drink in public places—even beaches. Dubai is incredibly strict about public drunkenness and has zero tolerance for drinking and driving.

Geography of Dubai – Wikipedia

Dubai is a city in the United Arab Emirates that is located on the Persian Gulf coast. Apart from being a city, it is also one of the seven Emirates of the United Arab Emirates, which comprise the country of the United Arab Emirates. It is approximately at sea level (above). Its southern border is shared with the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, its northern border with the Emirate of Sharjah, and its southern border with the Sultanate of Oman. Hatta is a tiny exclave of the emirate that is bordered on three sides by Oman as well as by the emirates of Ajman (in the west) and Ras Al Khaimah (in the east).

ThePersian Gulfborders the western coast of the emirate.

Dubai is the most populous city in the United Arab Emirates.

The geography of Dubai, on the other hand, differs greatly from that of the southern section of the United Arab Emirates in that much of Dubai’s environment is emphasized by sandy desert patterns, whereas gravel deserts dominate much of the country’s southern area.

  1. East of the city, the salt-crusted coastal plains, known assabkha, give place to a line of dunes that runs north–south through the region.
  2. The Western Hajar Mountains, which run beside Dubai’s border with Oman near Hatta, take over from the flat sandy desert and become more mountainous.
  3. Dubai does not have any natural river systems or oasis; however, it does have a natural inlet, Dubai Creek, which has been dredged to make it deep enough to accommodate big ships.
  4. It is possible to drive across the Empty Quarter, which is a large sea of sand dunes that spans much of southern Dubai, and finally leads into the desert.
  5. A tsunami in the region is also unlikely, according to experts, because the Persian Gulf waters are not deep enough to produce a tsunami to strike the coastline.
  6. Sabkhaplains east of the city are home to desert hyacinths, while acacia and ghaftrees thrive on the flat plains in the vicinity of the Western Al Hajar mountains in the west.
  7. A variety of animals like as thehoubara bustard, striped hyena, caracal, desert fox, falcon, andArabian oryx may be found in Dubai’s desert.
  8. More than 300 kinds of fish, including the hammour, may be found in the seas surrounding Dubai.
  9. Several species of turtles, including the hawksbill turtle and the green turtle, may also be found in the region, both of which are considered endangered species.
  10. The eastern half of the city is known as the locality of Deira, and it is bordered on the east by the emirate of Sharjah and on the south by the town of Al Aweerin.

On the Jumeirah coastal strip, to the west of the Dubai Creek, a large portion of Dubai’s real-estate development has been focused. These areas include Port Rashid, Jebel Ali, the Burj Al Arab, the Palm Jumeirah, and the theme-based free-zone clusters such as Business Bay.

References

On the Persian Gulf coast, Dubai is the largest city in the United Arab Emirates and the country’s commercial center. Along with its status as a city, it is also one of the seven Emirates of the United Arab Emirates, which comprise the nation of the United Arab Emirates. In general, it is at or near sea level (above). Its southern border is shared with the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, its northern border with the Emirate of Sharjah, and its southern border is shared with the Sultanate of Oman. It is flanked on three sides by Oman, as well as by the emirates of Ajman (in the west) and Ras Al Khaimah (in the east).

  • The western shore of the emirate is bordered by the Persian Gulf.
  • Dubai is located at and covers an area of 4,114 km2(1,588 mi2).
  • The geography of Dubai, on the other hand, differs greatly from that of the southern section of the United Arab Emirates in that much of Dubai’s environment is emphasized by sandy desert patterns, whereas gravel deserts dominate much of the country’s southern portion.
  • Located east of the city, the salt-crusted coastal plains (called assabkha) give way to a line of dunes that runs north–south across the landscape.
  • The Western Hajar Mountains, which run beside Dubai’s border with Oman near Hatta, take over from the flat sandy plain and become visible.
  • However, Dubai does have a natural entrance called Dubai Creek that has been dredged to make it deep enough for huge ships to sail through.
  • It is possible to drive across the Empty Quarter, which is a large sea of sand dunes that encompasses much of southern Dubai, and then into the desert beyond.

A tsunami in the region, according to experts, is extremely unlikely since the Persian Gulf waters are not deep enough to create a tsunami.

Desert hyacinths thrive in the sabkhaplains east of the city, while acacia and ghaftrees grow on the flat plains in the vicinity of the Western Al Hajar mountains in the north.

A variety of animals like as thehoubara bustard, striped hyena, caracal, desert fox, falcon, andArabian oryx may be found in Dubai’s desert habitat.

Tropical fish, jellyfish, coral, dugong, dolphins, whales, and sharks are among the marine species found off the coast of Dubai.

In the city of Dubai, the creek flows from northeast to southwest.

Situated south of Deira lies theDubai International Airport, while the Palm Deirais located north of Deira on the Persian Gulf.

On the Jumeirah coastal strip, to the west of the Dubai Creek, a large portion of Dubai’s real-estate boom can be found concentrated. These areas include Port Rashid, Jebel Ali, the Burj Al Arab, the Palm Jumeirah, and themed free-zone clusters such as Business Bay, among others.

What body of water does Dubai border?

Persian Gulf The western shore of the emirate is bordered by the Gulf of Oman (Persian Gulf). Dubai is located at and has a land area of 4,114 km2 (1,588 mi2), which constitutes a major extension over its initial 1,500 km2 designation owing to land reclamation from the sea. Dubai is the world’s most populous city, with a population of over 8 million people. Dubai is located immediately in the heart of the Arabian Desert.

Where does Dubai get its water?

It is estimated that Dubai’s desalination facilities provide about 99 percent of the city’s potable drinking water. Desalination plants are facilities that treat seawater to make it useable. Sea water from the Arabian Gulf is piped into DUBAL, the Dubai Aluminum facility, to keep the aluminum smelters cool during the summer months.

What are the borders of the United Arab Emirates?

The United Arab Emirates is bordered on the northwest by Qatar, on the west and south by Saudi Arabia, and on the east and northeast by Oman. The capital of the United Arab Emirates is Dubai.

Where does water come from in United Arab Emirates?

Rainfall, to the extent that it occurs, is channeled away from the mountains in the form of seasonal wadis that drain into salt flats, or sabkhahs, whose drainage is frequently obstructed by the country’s continually shifting sand dunes, resulting in inland salt flats.

Where are the bodies of water in the Middle East?

When the Suez Canal, an artificial body of water in Egypt that links the Mediterranean Sea with the Red Sea, first opened to commercial boats in 1869, the world was taken by surprise. It is 100.82 miles long, with two access canals that are 14 miles and 5.6 miles in length, respectively. The Nile River, which runs through Egypt for 4,258 km, is.

Where is the eastern border of Saudi Arabia?

Suez Canal is an artificial body of water in Egypt that links the Mediterranean Sea with the Red Sea. It became navigable by ships in 1869 and is still in operation today. With two access canals that are 14 miles and 5.6 miles in length, it stretches for 100.82 miles in total. The Nile River runs across Egypt for 4,258 km and is.

THE 5 BEST Dubai Bodies of Water (with Photos)

Waterbodies are a type of body of water. Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about the Emirate of Dubai The following are the top locations in Dubai for bodies of water:

  • Waterways such as Dubai Creek and Dubai Water Canal, Al Qudra Lake, and Love Lakes, among others, are featured throughout the city.

On Tripadvisor, you can see additional bodies of water in Dubai. The following are the top sites in Dubai to find kid-friendly bodies of water: On Tripadvisor, you may find other bodies of water for children in Dubai. The following are the greatest sites in Dubai for couples looking for bodies of water: On Tripadvisor, you may find further bodies of water for couples in Dubai. The following are the greatest spots in Dubai for groups looking for bodies of water: Tripadvisor has other bodies of water for couples in Dubai.

What sea or ocean is Dubai and the Emirates in the UAE, name and photo

On Tripadvisor, you can find more affordable bodies of water in Dubai.

Helpful information

Dubai is one of the first cities in the United Arab Emirates to attract tourists, and it has grown into a popular tourist destination.

It was originally intended to be a retail destination, but the nearby beaches and fast increasing infrastructure soon transformed it into a first-class tourist destination. to the point of content

Where?

More recently, on the site where Dubai presently exists, there was a tiny village devoted to the pearl trade industry. There were one-story cottages on the location of the iconic skyscrapers, and there was a tiny mosque in the midst of a city with absolutely no infrastructure. When oil resources were discovered, the city saw explosive expansion. As a result of this rapid development, Abu Dhabi has evolved to become one of the world’s most developed cities as well as the capital of the Emirate, which is one of seven tiny states situated in the United Arab Emirates.

The country’s capital is Abu Dhabi.

In this post, you will learn how to get to Dubai from Moscow, how long the flights take, and whether there are any direct flights available.

General information with photos

Dubai has a total land area of 4 114 km2, with the majority of it being of a flat, sand-covered plain. Despite the aridity and lack of options for extensive vegetation cover, date palms, acacia, and oranges, tangerines, and other citrus fruits are grown here, and groomed lawns and other greenery may be found around the city. Owing to the aridity of the region, there are no natural reservoirs on the territory of Dubai; nonetheless, due to the desires of the local people, the city recently completed an ambitious project – the construction of a water channel known as “Dubai Creek.” In only three years, the new canal, which has since become a natural attraction, has been improved and made more accessible.

See also:  When Was Dubai Developed? (Correct answer)

He walked further into the city, dividing it into two half – Deira and Bur Dubai – before returning to the surface.

On both sides of the lagoon, businesses such as stores, cafes, and marketplaces sprung up, and the pond eventually became a haven for flamingos.

It was only for a short period of time that new districts arose, the most notable of which are the following:

  • Bur Dubai — the historical district of the city, which has several tourist sites
  • Deira is an ancient, highly inhabited region with a distinct Oriental flair
  • The Jumeirah area is an upscale neighborhood in the center of Dubai
  • At a distance from the city center, there is Dubai Marina, which is the most exclusive part of the city.

If early profits from Dubai were derived only from oil, now this city has risen to become one of the richest in the world, as well as the country’s most important tourist and financial destination.

Every year there arenew records, notably the development and growth of infrastructure. If you are fortunate enough to travel to the United Arab Emirates, make sure to see the attractions listed in this article. For a brief period of time, the following situation existed in Dubai:

  1. The world’s tallest buildings
  2. An artificial island in the shape of a palm tree
  3. The world’s only hotel with seven stars
  4. A unique ski slope in the desert
  5. Privateunderground

Dubai is one of the world’s fastest-growing cities on its own. But it’s not alone. Because there are no taxes on the territory of Dubai, commerce and special events such as exhibits, conferences, and seminars are aggressively promoted. name=”kakoe-more-v-dubae”

What is the sea in Dubai?

It is important to note that Dubai is located on the Persian Gulf at a height of 5 meters above sea level, which allows us to answer the question “what sea is Dubai?” earlier in this section.

Sea or ocean water?

Geographically, the United Arab Emirates is bordered by the Gulf, the sea, and the ocean, and it is known as the “Gulf Coast.” There are two coastlines, one that borders the Gulf of Oman and the other that borders the Persian Gulf. Most of the towns and resorts, including Dubai, are built on the waters of the Gulf, which, in turn, is a portion of the Arabian sea– a pond relating to the Indian ocean’s internal waters– before reaching the waters of the Gulf. To the Persian Gulf (which is still referred to as the “Arabian Gulf”), which is completely off of the coast of the Emirate of Fujairah, as well as other tourist cities in the Emirate of Sharjah, is a short flight.

It is worth mentioning that the shoreline of Dubai is only washed by one bay, which goes by the name of Persian Bay.

When returning from the UAE, it may be said that the holiday was spent by the sea and ocean.

The Persian Gulf

As a result of its immense size, the Persian Gulf’s waters have washed not only the shore of Dubai but also the territories of Oman and Qatar as well as Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Kuwait, Iran, and Iraq. The depth of the Bay is just around 10 meters, while the deepest point on the bottom is 102 meters below the top of the water. One of the hotels in Dubai has been listed as one of the world’s most costly hotels, according to Forbes magazine. Read on to find more about the various accommodations that the hotel Ibis Al Barsha has in common with a premier location.

The chemical composition of this region is more similar to that of a sea than that of the Gulf of Oman.

  • The Jumeirah Beach Residence
  • Sunset Beach
  • Kite Beach
  • And the Jumeirah Open Beach are all nearby.

Beach parks have also been constructed throughout the Gulf Coast, where visitors spend the majority of their time. The most well-known and visited parks in Dubai are Al Mamzar and Jumeirah Beach. A terrific complement to a beach vacation in Dubai are diving clubs, which are built for both beginners and professionals, as well as water parks, which are the largest in the Middle East. to the point of content

Interesting facts

  • All of Dubai’s indigenous residents are extremely wealthy individuals
  • 7 kilogram of gold should be given as a wedding gift by the husband and bride
  • Manners in Dubai are a little more relaxed in comparison to other places
  • Even tourists are not permitted to drink water until after dusk during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan
  • Approximately 90% of the population is made up of immigrants from Iran, Pakistan, and India
  • Women have their own carriages on the metro, and they have their own tables in restaurants
  • Only the wealthy people of the United Arab Emirates may afford many spouses
  • Tourists are drawn to the capital of the United Arab Emirates, which is no less appealing. Check out our post on where Abu Dhabi is located.
  • Tourists are not permitted to enter the nation if their passports have an entry visa for Israel
  • There are 166 rooms in the Burj Khalifa, which is 828 meters high and has 828 meters of height. Because the schools are quite chilly, you should dress in long-sleeved clothing
  • The legendaryJumeirah mosque is pictured on the 500 dirham currency
  • The WorldIslands archipelago, which is 4 kilometers off the coast and repeats the continents, is worth a visit. The most convenient mode of transportation throughout the city — taxis for females – with a pink roof
  • It is not possible to photograph military and government structures in the United Arab Emirates
  • Girls are not permitted to dress in immodest attire.

Here’s a video of the Persian Gulf in Dubai taken from a helicopter:

Geography of Dubai – Location

Dubai is a city in the United Arab Emirates that is located on the Persian Gulf, to the northeast of the country. Dubai is the second most populous emirate in the world, with an urban area of 3885 square kilometers and a city area of around 35 square kilometers. However, with the addition of the man-made islands, such as the Waterfront, the three Palms, the World, the Universe, and Dubailand, as well as several other development projects now ongoing in the desert, the city is expected to double in size in the near future.

Located in the heart of Dubai, the Dubai Creek separates the city into two distinct regions: Deira and Bur Dubai.

Dubai Creek is a natural inlet from the Persian Gulf that is 15.2 kilometers long and around which the city’s trade evolved.

Dubai’s borders with Abu Dhabi in the south, Sharjah in the northeast, and the Sultanate of Oman in the southeast are shared with these other countries.

Its unusual geographical location provides it with a strategic position that allows it to link with all of the local Gulf States, as well as with East Africa and South Asia.

Climate

The line of the Tropic of Cancer passes across the United Arab Emirates, resulting in hot and sunny weather in Dubai. Summer temperatures in the Emirate average 25°C (77°F), with temperatures along the coast ranging from 12-15°C (53-59°F) and temperatures in the desert and mountains ranging from 5°C (41°F). At night, the temperature drops significantly, and areas near the coasts experience average humidity levels between 50 and 60 percent. Dubai has extremely hot and humid conditions throughout the summer, with temperatures reaching the mid-40s.

When it rains in Dubai, it is uncommon and does not linger more than a couple of days on average.

During the course of a year, Dubai receives an average of five days of rainfall.

Population

As of September 2019, Dubai has a population of 3.33 million people, with three-quarters of the population being male. Only 5% of the population is comprised of indigenous Emiratis, with the other 95% consisting of expats from all over the world. Dubai is a cosmopolitan community. Asians, primarily Indians, and other ethnicities from other neighboring Arab nations make up the majority of the expatriate community in the United Arab Emirates. Furthermore, there is a substantial number of Iranians, who arrived in large numbers following the Islamic revolution in 1979, when the most rich and educated Iranians relocated to the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Dubai’s population has been increasing at a rate of around 5.64 percent per year, and the city has a population density of 408.18 people per square kilometer.

9 Bodies of Water in United Arab Emirates That You Shouldn’t Miss

In the United Arab Emirates (UAE), a federation of seven emirates on the southern fringe of the Arabian Peninsula, nomadic tribal tradition and contemporary civilisation coexist. If you look beyond the desert that occupies four-fifths of the country’s land area, you’ll find the UAE capital Abu Dhabi, an oil-rich city of skyscrapers, parks, and malls, as well as Dubai, which has a split personality of luxury resorts and covered marketplaces, upscale boutiques, and traditional craftsmen. Traveling over rolling red sand dunes into the Hatta Mountains, where the 200-year-old Sharia Mosque lies among 30 rebuilt structures made of sandalwood and mud, provides a welcome respite from the hustle and bustle of the city.

1. Dubai Creek

The Mashraf Building is located in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Overall Ratings

4.5 out of 5 stars based on 9,770 reviews Drive down Dubai Creek, which serves as the city’s lifeline and heartbeat, and which divides the city into two parts: Deira to the north and Bur Dubai to the south.

Reviewed By 128gabis- Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Dubai Creek has it all – a spectacular view of the city, a romantic Dhow dinner cruise or a stroll along the creekside, taking an Abra across the Creek to the other side and strolling around the “old” souk or on the other side visiting the spice souk and gold souk, enjoying passing by the dhows and experiencing the vibrating life while getting an impression of the past, and so on. It’s always a pleasure to visit this “Oasis” of “old” and “modern” Dubai and take in its sights and sounds.

2. Buhaira Corniche

Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Bukhara Street, United Arab Emirates

Overall Ratings

Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, Bukhara Street, Sharjah

Reviewed By MercyTey

Excellent for a family outing, including a great water fountain. There are a number of restaurants accessible. It’s a nice place to relax and exercise in the morning. This is the appropriate outfit for the chilly winter weather.

3. Dubai Water Canal

Dubai is a city in the United Arab Emirates.

Overall Ratings

4.5 out of 5 stars based on 420 reviews A cruise from the Marina to the Dubai Water Canal was the inspiration for the establishment of Columbus Yachts and Boat Rentals in 2013. Admire breathtaking vistas along the Canal Route, the Sheikh Zayed Bridge, and other locations. Luxury Yachts offers a 4-hour yacht trip for groups of 1 to 100 individuals.

Reviewed By 255nicholast- Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Even if it is possible that the only way to appreciate it is by boat during the hot summer months, taking a stroll along the Dubai Water Canal during the colder months of the year is a fantastic way to get some exercise while taking in some spectacular views of the city. The canal begins at Jumeirah Beach and ascends through Jumeirah and Business Bay before reaching the Burj Khalifa. Several architecturally noteworthy bridges span it, and at the Sheikh Zayed Road crossing, there is a spectacular waterfall on either side of the road, which is lighted purple at night and has sections that are wide enough to enable boats to sail through.

4. Al Qudra Lake

Dubai is a city in the United Arab Emirates.

Overall Ratings

4.0 out of 5 stars based on 234 reviews

Reviewed By 37basmaa

When planning a family day out or a get-together with friends, this is the ideal location. You must be able to enjoy a beautiful lake view while sipping on a cup of karak tea that has been freshly prepared on the spot. I would suggest that you carry all of your picnic necessities so that you may enjoy the day to the fullest. The bbq will be fantastic as well. The lake horse riding tour with a pleasant guide from “Al Jiad Stable” would be a fantastic way to start your camping or resting experience before you begin your camping or resting.

5. Love Lake

Al Qudra is a neighborhood in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Overall Ratings

4.0 out of 5 stars based on 47 reviews

Reviewed By I7561CBvanessas- Andover, United Kingdom

We had a great time during the couple of hours we were here.

There is a well-maintained trail around the lakes that you may stroll on. It’s fun to look at koi carp. There are several picture options. At various locations in the water between the lakes, you may take a stroll. It’s well worth the journey just to soak in the peace and quiet.

6. Love Lakes

Dubai is a city in the United Arab Emirates.

Overall Ratings

4.0 out of 5 stars based on 7 reviews

7. Al Rafisah Dam

Khorfakkan is a city in the United Arab Emirates.

Overall Ratings

4.0 out of 5 stars based on 20 reviews

Reviewed By JimLloyds- Dubai, United Arab Emirates

When it comes to hidden gems, there are some that are truly hidden and others that are hidden in plain sight, and such is the case with the Al Rafisah Dam, an alluring and stunning off the beaten path travel destination tucked away far from mydubai’s urban spread and out of sight of even the most seasoned explorers and adventure seekers, so much an oasis itself on the east coast of Khorfakkan clinging to the sides of the straddling western hajjar mountains Honestly, I did very little research before going, and I remember only looking up the route on Google because it looked reasonable for a weekend escape from the hustle of everyday life to free-diving on an endless road of zig-zag curves in and out over five tunnels laid through the mountains, busting our favorite songs on the play list, with our little one in tow, spending uninterrupted hours of endless conversations and laughter galore, focus on the road ahead of us, and not on the road ahead of us.

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Alternatively, if you want to take things to the next level of peace and tranquility and add a touch of luxury to your life, combine this back-to-nature experience with a cool and laid-back morning of kayaking, which are available to rent, providing you with a one-of-a-kind opportunity to gaze at the awe-inspiring grandeur of the reservoir whilst paddling through the labyrinth of its passages, where you might be lucky enough to have And there’s no denying that the soothing sound of the flowing water, which adds an enchanting atmosphere of tranquil solitude to the serene emerald green landscape that surrounds the jaw-dropping panoramic vistas of the rugged mountains looming over the pure azure reservoir, creates such an enchanting atmosphere of tranquil solitude that anyone, regardless of their thoughts and beliefs, can come to find peace.

It’s hard to imagine that despite its spectacular vistas, it’s not featured prominently on most travel plans, for reasons I’m not sure of, and the world has yet to discover them, but let’s keep it our little “secret” vacation spot!

8. Lake Zakher

30) Al Ain Truck Rd, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates, Abu Dhabi

Overall Ratings

3.5 stars out of 5 based on 11 reviews

9. Love Lake

Dubai Emirates of the United Arab Emirates ThingsToDoPost 2018 All rights reserved. ThingsToDoPost

The Arabian Gulf is more than just a water body, it is a living system that we need to preserve

It is much more than a body of water to the citizens of Abu Dhabi, who consider it to be their backyard. There are recollections of struggle and optimism when fishing and pearl diving were the primary sources of money and food for the entire family. It evokes images of old trade, in which products were traded between the East and the West; and, of course, it evokes images of beauty and natural beauty. The Arabian Gulf is busier than it has been in years. The maritime industry is thriving. It is estimated that the emirate of Abu Dhabi welcomed over 35,000 commercial boats and approximately 100 cruise ships in 2014.

  • Furthermore, Abu Dhabi is poised to become the regional hub for “halal cruising,” according to industry experts.
  • The Abu Dhabi Ports Company is now dredging to deepen and develop channels, as well as building new harbours, in order to handle present and future maritime traffic.
  • Ships may discharge wastewater, oil and grease, fuel spills, anti-fouling chemicals (which are used to prevent the growth of marine organisms in the hulls of boats) and ballast water (which is used to increase the stability of vessels) into the ocean.
  • Dredging increases the amount of strain on the quality of sea water.
  • If the lack of clarity continues for several months, it has the potential to harm seagrass beds and corals, both of which require sunshine to survive.
  • The fast population increase in Abu Dhabi has also had an impact on the quality of the city’s marine water.
  • The production of fresh water in Abu Dhabi is reliant on desalination facilities.

It is believed that discharges from these plants have a deleterious influence on marine life because they alter the salinity level and temperature of the water in which they are released.

High-altitude blooms can also have an impact on desalination activities, as algae can jam the intake pipes and membrane filters of desalination facilities, causing them to be shut down.

Ensuring that the emirate’s coastal waters remain safe for people, plants and animals is a fundamental mandate of the Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi._ More from Opinion_ may be found here.

We collect samples and test numerous water quality indicators through a network of monitoring stations in order to understand the amounts of nutrients, organics, microorganisms, and heavy metals in saltwater.

In addition, we have created an automated early warning system that aids in the prediction of the creation of HBAs.

As a result of this knowledge, we are better equipped to design and implement laws and regulations to limit the effects of human activity on the marine environment in order to maintain public health, biodiversity, and our economy.

Environmental licenses are issued to industrial facilities and projects in order to maintain control over the environment.

Moreover, our involvement continues during the building and operational stages of the projects, where we evaluate quarterly monitoring reports and check the facilities to ensure that they are operating in accordance with the conditions of their licences.

The group is comprised of representatives from all key parties.

Inter-agency marine water quality protection projects are developed and implemented by the committee, which also serves as a design and implementation oversight body.

Water, according to Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces, is more essential than oil.

This includes sea water in a country whose past, present, and future are all intertwined with the Arabian Gulf, which is a living system that we must protect and maintain. Secretary General of the Abu Dhabi Environment Agency, Razan Khalifa Al Mubarak, holds the position of secretary general.

United Arab Emirates

INFORMATIONON FISHERIES MANAGEMENT IN THE UNITED ARAB EMIRATES November2003LOCATIONAND MAIN LANDING PLACES TheUnited Arab Emirates occupies a strategic position at the southern endof the Gulf lying between the Arabian Peninsula and Iran. The countryhas sea borders to two very distinct water bodies: the largest coastlineborders the embayment-like Gulf while the East coast has a border tothe more oceanic Gulf of Oman and Arabian Sea. With the exception ofa small purse seine industry operating out of Sharjah, the fisheriesof the UAE are entirely artisanal in nature. As a result, fishermenland their catch daily into a large number of small towns and villageson the both the East Coast and the Gulf coast. Themajority of the catch from all sectors is taken from Abu Dhabi Emirate,since this Emirate comprises over 65% of the sea area of the UnitedArab Emirates. However, the most productive areas are inshore areasnear to the Straits of Hormuz, around Ras al-Khaimah. Landings probablyalso consist of fish taken in other, neighboring, countries’ waters,although the quantity of such landings is not known.Fish are landed at approximately 30+ designated landing sites alongthe coast of the UAE and are generally auctioned at the market in whichthey are landed. Most landing places incorporate facilities for landing,storing, auctioning, wholesaling and retailing the catch while someof the larger landing places/markets also have simple processing facilitiesfor wholesale and retail customers. Some imported and trans-shippedproduct is also sold in the markets, although locally captured fishpre-dominate. Themain cities of Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Sharjah are the principal landingplaces with regionally important landing places also being located atAjman, al-Fujayrah, Ras al-Khaimah, Khawr Fakkan and Umm al-Qaywayn.To the west of Abu Dhabi, there are numerous small landing places, includingthose on the inhabited island of Delma that supply fish to local populations. Fishsupplies to interior cities and towns are sourced from coastal landingplaces and markets and the larger interior centers, such as al-Ayn,also have well developed fish markets. FISHERIESPOLICIES AND PLANS Themain objective of the UAE’s fishery policy is to promote the sustainableproductivity of local fish stocks in order to ensure a continuous freshfish supply. Another objective is to satisfy national demand by minimizingthe difference between the local fishery production and total fish consumption.Policy aims are only contained in the relevant laws related to fisheriesmanagement and administration, since no specific fisheries managementplans have been developed for any fisheries. The Fisheries Law 23 of1999 does not explicitly state what the policy aims are, although theflavor of the Law is very much concerned with fisheries administration.The law that establishes the Environmental research and Wildlife developmentAgency (ERWDA) in Abu Dhabi not only recognizes ERWDA as the competentauthority for managing fisheries in that Emirate but also emphasizesthe protection and conservation aspects of ERWDA’s role. Overallstrategies Theoverall development objectives of the government for the fisheries sectorsare:
  • It is much more than a body of water to the residents of Abu Dhabi, who consider it to be their home. A time when fishing and pearl diving were the primary sources of revenue as well as the primary source of daily meals is recalled. As well as ancient trade, when things were transferred between the East and West, it evokes images of natural beauty and splendor. In recent years, the Arabian Gulf has become more crowded than ever. Ship traffic is rising at an unprecedented rate. A total of 35,000 commercial boats and almost 100 cruise ships docked in the emirate of Abu Dhabi during 2014. Tankers transporting oil via the Strait of Hormuz transport twenty percent of all global oil exchanged each day. Apart from that, Abu Dhabi is poised to establish itself as the regional center for “halal cruising.” A new program to encourage cruise lines to cater to the demands of Muslim tourists is being developed by the Department of Culture and Tourism – Abu Dhabi, and the department anticipates the yearly growth rate to surpass 10%. The Abu Dhabi Ports Company is dredging to deepen and develop channels, as well as building new harbours, in order to handle present and future maritime traffic. Shipping and dredging are important components of Abu Dhabi’s economic development
  • Nonetheless, they have a negative influence on the surrounding ecosystem. The discharge of wastewater, oil and grease, fuel spills, anti-fouling chemicals (which prevent the growth of marine organisms in the hulls of boats) and ballast water (which improves the stability of vessels) into maritime water is permitted by law. They are not only a source of pollution that degrades marine water quality, but they are also a source of alien species transported in ballast tanks, which may become invasive and outcompete native species, causing them to go extinct in some cases. Dredging increases the amount of strain placed on the quality of sea water. Because excavations move sediments from the bottom of a body of water, they can degrade its purity significantly. Seagrass beds and corals, which require sunshine to grow, can be destroyed if there is a lack of clarity for several months. It is necessary to raise public awareness of the problems associated with shipping and dredging, as well as to implement regulations in accordance with the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, which was ratified by the United Arab Emirates in June 2017 and entered into force in September 2017 to alleviate pressures on our marine waters. Because of increasing population increase, the quality of the water in Abu Dhabi’s marine environment has also been harmed. As the world population grows, the need for food, energy, and water will increase as well. Desalination plants provide fresh water for the city of Abu Dhabi. The emirate is home to seven large desalination facilities, each of which produces roughly 3.2 billion litres of water each day on an average. It is believed that discharges from these plants have a deleterious influence on marine life by altering the salinity and temperature of the water. Increasing the number of people also means that more treated wastewater from residential and industrial areas is discharged into the Gulf, increasing the concentration of nutrients in seawater, causing a phenomenon known as eutrophication, which can lead to outbreaks of harmful algal blooms, which can cause oxygen depletion and the death of aquatic organisms in the Gulf. High algal blooms can also have an impact on desalination activities, as algae can jam the intake pipes and membrane filters of desalination facilities, causing them to shut down completely. Given that eutrophication does not provide a direct health risk to recreational water users and that there is no bacterial contamination that might endanger the general public’s health, the water quality in Abu Dhabi’s marine environment is judged excellent and safe for public use, including swimming. The Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi has a basic responsibility to ensure that the emirate’s coastal waterways are safe for humans, plants, and animals._ More from Opinion_ may be found by clicking here. An EAD effort to monitor the quality of sea water began in 2006, with the help of the European Environment Agency (EAD). We collect samples and test numerous water quality indicators using a network of monitoring stations in order to better understand the quantities of nutrients, organics, microorganisms, and heavy metals present in saltwater. As part of this effort, we have also built an automated early warning system that aids in the predicting of HBA development. Water quality is assessed by our team once the data is collected, which occurs once an hour, seven days a week. These data help us establish and implement laws and regulations aimed at mitigating the negative affects of human activities on the marine environment, therefore protecting public health, biodiversity, and the economy. Since effluent discharges from industrial facilities are a source of nutrients, sediments, heavy metals, and other pollutants entering waterways, the Environmental Protection Agency (EAD) plays an essential role in regulating and managing the industrial sector from damaging marine water. Environmental licenses are issued to industrial sites and projects in order to maintain control. Aside from that, we provide suggestions on how to minimize their environmental effect. Not only that, but our involvement continues throughout the development and operating phases of the projects, including evaluating quarterly monitoring reports and visiting the facilities to verify that they adhere to all applicable regulations and standards. It was founded in 2012 under the direction of Mohamed Ahmed Al Bowardi, the managing director of EAD, and is charged with improving the quality of marine water. The group includes representatives from all key parties. Specifically, it is responsible for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of all projects and initiatives identified in the executive plan for improving marine water quality, as well as for ensuring coordination between relevant stakeholders in order to address challenges and develop appropriate solutions to protect public health and the environment. Designing and implementing inter-agency marine water quality protection programs is the responsibility of the committee, which also supervises these efforts. Approximately 37 initiatives have been completed, with a further 26 now being investigated. It was once remarked by Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, that “water is more essential than oil.” This includes sea water in a country whose past, present, and future are all intertwined with the Arabian Gulf, which is a living system that we must protect and conserve. President of the Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi, Razan Khalifa Al Mubarak, is the secretary general.

INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT MEASURES The licensing of fishermen and fishing vessels, closure of fishing areas, closure of fishing seasons, and the limitation of specific fishing methods are the primary fisheries management measures used in the United Arab Emirates. Inputs, on the other hand, have typically been completely uncontrolled. The Emirate of Abu Dhabi, on the other hand, implemented limitations on the number of fish traps (locally known as’gargoor’) that may be used per vessel in 2003, as well as the suspension of the issuance of new commercial fishing permits.

Additionally, regulations were implemented in the Abu Dhabi Emirate beginning in October 2003 that required all fish traps to be equipped with a government-issued tag (effectively limiting the number of traps) and to have an escape grid built into them in order to reduce the capture of small fish (see below).

  • There is no trawling in the United Arab Emirates since it has been prohibited since the 1970s in an effort to safeguard marine ecosystems.
  • The number of vessels registered is dropping, with 5,191 vessels registered in 2002, compared to 7,700 in 1998.
  • However, only a small percentage of these registered vessels (possibly as low as 20 percent) are really engaged in fishing activities.
  • Moreover, the government’s subsidization of local fisheries continues to be a significant component of its management strategies.

In the UAE, legislation and associated regulations are established, implemented, and governed by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MoAF), which is situated in Dubai, despite the fact that each of the seven Emirates has some input into fisheries arrangements in their respective maritime regions.

  1. Landings and market statistics are collected by the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries through surveys of landing locations.
  2. Recreational fishing licenses were first issued in Abu Dhabi in 2002 and then in Dubai in 2003, respectively.
  3. Protecting maritime environment and rare and endangered species, such as dugongs, are the primary concerns of these western regions.
  4. In addition, substantial sections of the UAE’s territorial seas are covered by oil concessions, and fishing operations in these regions are either prohibited or severely limited, as previously stated.
  5. However, there is no coordinated policy for artificial reef development, whether in terms of site or building requirements, and no evaluation of their efficacy or impact has been conducted.
  6. At the moment, just one business is engaged in aquaculture in the United Arab Emirates, with only modest numbers of imported sea bream (Sparusspp.) being produced in the country.
  7. The artisanal fleet is owned by UAE individuals who have made capital investments (in the form of boats and equipment), with revenues shared between the fishermen and the boat owners.
  8. PROJECTIONOF SUPPLY AND DEMAND There has been little research on anticipating supply and demand, and the uncertainty around the trustworthiness of production figures makes such forecasting dangerous.
  9. These imports are most likely to originate in neighboring nations, namely the Sultanate of Oman.

The law that established the Environmental Research and Wildlife Development Agency (ERWDA) in Abu Dhabi not only recognizes ERWDA as the competent authority for managing fisheries in that Emirate, but it also places a strong emphasis on the agency’s role in the protection and conservation of the environment.

The National Fisheries Authority’s organizational structure is shown in Figure 1.

The MAF’s primary responsibilities include the licensing and registration of fishing boats, the administration of subsidies and loans to fishermen, as well as aquaculture research and management. The MAF has the following organizational structure:

What Are The Sources Of Drinking Water In Dubai?

In Dubai, there is a desalination facility. On the planet, freshwater is often recognized as one of the most precious and renewable natural resources. It accounts for around 2.5 percent of the total water on the planet, with just 0.77 percent of it being readily accessible. Gulf countries such as the United Arab Emirates, for example, are among those with some of the largest discrepancies between water supply and demand in the whole world. The rapid expansion of the region, as well as the rise in population, are adding to the difficulty of the situation.

  • The capacity of desalination in the United Arab Emirates alone accounts for 26 percent of the world’s total.
  • Temperatures in Dubai’s summer are on the high side, with typical summer highs of 107 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • The rate of evapotranspiration accounts for more than 75% of the yearly rainfall, with just 15% of the total amount falling as runoff into the sea.
  • Ground abreaction rates that are too high result in salty and dry aquifers later on.

Water Sources In Dubai

Dubai has one of the world’s highest rates of water consumption, with an average of 145 gallons of water consumed per person per day on average. The fast urbanization, the climate, and the growth in population are all contributing to the high levels of consumption. The Arabian Gulf provides Dubai with its principal supply of freshwater, which is desalinated saltwater. It meets 89.9 percent of the city’s water supply requirements, according to estimates. The remaining portion of the water demand is met mostly by subsurface water resources.

The irrigation industry uses wastewater and is thus not included in the data that has been produced above.

Desalination Plants

Seawater is desalinated by the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (DEWA) plants, which are located around the city. Most of the time, seawater is collected through intakes in the Arabian Gulf. Additionally, water that is needed for cooling at the aluminium smelters in Jebel Ali is transferred to the DEWA desalination facility. The energy necessary for the desalination process is generated by burning fossil fuels such as coal, natural gas, or diesel. After that, the desalinated water is injected into the distribution system for home use and consumption.

It, on the other hand, has an aftertaste that differs from one region to the next.

According to official estimates, the yearly cost of desalination is around 11.8 billion Dirham, which equates to 1 Dirham for every 37 liters of water produced or used.

A large amount of air pollution is produced as a result of this practice.

They have impacted water quality, resulting in the suspension of water production at a number of desalination units around the country. Examples include the suspension of operations at the Ras Al Khaimah desalination facility for a week in 2008 owing to the presence of red tide.

Treated Wastewater

To fulfill the city’s current water demands, treated water is an essential alternate source. The government has made significant investments in wastewater treatment facilities as well as the expansion and enhancement of urban sewage networks. The modernization of such critical infrastructure has resulted in increased amounts of treated water being produced. Regardless of the eventual application, wastewater is often treated in its entirety or in part. The United Arab Emirates now possesses state-of-the-art water treatment facilities that can perform advanced and tertiary water filtration and treatment.

Groundwater

Groundwater is the largest source of natural water in Dubai, accounting for around 80% of the total. Groundwater is also regarded as a critical supply of natural water in the country, second only to rivers and lakes. The subterranean water reserves in the United Arab Emirates are now estimated to be 22,601 billion cubic feet. The overall amount of freshwater, on the other hand, is only estimated to be 706 billion cubic feet in volume. Groundwater resources are divided into two categories: nonrenewable (deep aquifers) and renewable (surface aquifers) (shallow aquifers).

In addition, the government has implemented a number of initiatives, such as active monitoring and regulatory programs, that are targeted at ensuring long-term groundwater management.

Surface Water

There is very little surface water on the planet’s surface in Dubai. It contains water that has been held in ponds as well as floodwater. In addition, because Dubai is located in a dry belt zone, rainfall is scarce, and flooding tend to seep into the earth when they occur. Surface water harvesting and storage are now in high demand due to a lack of available storage space. In Dubai, replenishment of groundwater in renewable aquifers from surface water has the potential to considerably increase the city’s water supply.

When compared to tanks and industrial storage facilities, this type of storage is considered to be safer and more dependable.

Water Availability In The Future

  1. The demand for water in Dubai is predicted to rise in the future as a result of an expected increase in population and industrial activity. The home, business, and industrial sectors will be the primary drivers of the increase in demand. Because of a scarcity of arable lands and diminishing groundwater supplies, the demand for water in other sectors, such as the agriculture industry, is likely to stay stable. It is envisaged that technological advancements in the desalination business would result in an increase in water supply at a reasonable cost. The International Centre for Biosaline Agriculture, which is based in Dubai, is now doing research into salt-tolerant crops that can be grown in brackish water, therefore reducing the excessive use of fresh groundwater.

Dubai (city)

It is projected that demand for water in Dubai would increase in the future, as a result of an increase in population and industrial development. The home, commercial, and industrial sectors will be the primary drivers of demand growth. Because of a scarcity of arable lands and diminishing groundwater supplies, the demand for water in other sectors such as the agriculture industry is likely to stay stable. Increased water supply is predicted to be achieved at a reasonable cost as a result of technological advancements in the desalination sector.

The International Centre for Biosaline Agriculture, which is based in Dubai, is now conducting research into salt-tolerant crops that may be grown in brackish water, therefore reducing the excessive use of freshgroundwater.

Character of the city

The demand for water in Dubai is predicted to increase in the future as a result of an expected increase in population and industrial activity. The home, business, and industrial sectors will be the primary drivers of the increase in consumer demand. Because of a scarcity of arable lands and diminishing groundwater supplies, the demand for water in other sectors, such as the agriculture industry, is predicted to stay stable. The desalination sector is expected to innovate in order to improve water supply at a reasonable cost.

Landscape

Small lengths of sandy beaches may be found in the western region of Dubai, which have aided in the growth of the city’s tourism sector. Dubai’s leadership have tried to expand the city’s restricted seafronts, and, in the lack of natural offshore islands, developers have been urged to create massive man-made islands off the coast of the city, a move that has sparked international controversy. These include the Palm Jumeirah, which is shaped like a palm tree and is the most well-known of them.

Palm Jumeirah is a landmark in Dubai.

Image courtesy of NASA.

City site and layout

Dubai is located on the southern coasts of the Persian Gulf, straddling a natural inlet known as Dubai Creek. Because the early city’s economy was based on fishing, pearl diving, and marine trade, the area served as Dubai’s geographic center for more than a century. Those who have lived in Dubai for a long time may recognize the buildings that line the creek, the most of which date back to the 1960s and are rarely more than two floors high. A number of much older structures have been renovated in the Bastakiyyah area, which is located on the western side of the creek.

The new city center is comprised of a stretch of towers that along Sheikh Zayed Road in Abu Dhabi.

The Dubai International Financial Centre, which is housed in a futuristic arch-shaped building, and the Burj Khalifa, which was the world’s tallest building at the time of its official opening in 2010 and was named after the president of the United Arab Emirates and emir of Abu Dhabi, Khalifa ibn Zayed Al Nahyan, are both located close to Sheikh Zayed Road.

The Burj al-Arab, a massive sail-shaped structure that serves as a luxury hotel, is located on the outskirts of the city. A little further west, there are new clusters of skyscrapers encircling a man-made harbor and a number of artificial lakes.

Climate

In common with the rest of the Persian Gulf coastline, Dubai enjoys a hot temperature all year round. Humidity is highest during the summer months and lowest during the rest of the year, with the exception of the winter months. The coldest winter month is often January, with lows of approximately 15 degrees Celsius (49 degrees Fahrenheit), while the warmest summer month is typically July, with highs of more than 40 degrees Celsius (104 degrees Fahrenheit).

People

Over the past two centuries, Dubai’s population has slowly increased from a few thousand native residents to well over two million, representing a tenfold increase. The majority of the early population growth were the result of merchants from neighboring nations deciding to migrate to Dubai because of the city’s business-friendly atmosphere, according to the United Nations Population Division. The city’s building boom in the latter part of the twentieth century resulted in a significant increase in the number of South Asian laborers as well as an influx of talented expats from all over the world, who today play an essential role in Dubai’s multi-sector economy.

The majority of the expatriate population, with the exception of laborers who are housed in work camps outside the city boundaries, is scattered across Dubai.

There are large Christian, Hindu, and Sikh groups in this country, but the majority of the indigenous people and the majority of the expatriate population are Muslim.

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