What It’S Like To Live In Dubai? (Solved)

  • The standard of living is very high. Crime is very low. Dubai is a very tolerant emirate – tolerant of others’ beliefs and ways of life. It is also one of the most moderate in terms of applying the rules of Islam to everyone’s everyday life.

What is it really like to live in Dubai?

Dubai is a very tolerant emirate – tolerant of others’ beliefs and ways of life. It is also one of the most moderate in terms of applying the rules of Islam to everyone’s everyday life. Expats can buy alcohol in Dubai and also they are allowed to eat and drink during the daylight hours of Ramadan.

What salary do I need to live in Dubai?

American women living in Dubai If women want to sponsor their family to live in the country, they must earn a minimum monthly salary of AED 10,000 (US$2,723)13. For men, the minimum salary is AED 4,000 (US$1,089).

What is bad about living in Dubai?

It’s expensive to live here People don’t always realise that the cost of living in Dubai is very high. Rent, groceries and bills can amount to surprisingly large amounts, so it’s important not to be dazzled by a high salary – it might just cover essential bills.

Is it good living in Dubai?

It’s a very safe place to live In 2020, the UAE was the world’s only country to have three of its cities – Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Sharjah – all among the top ten safest cities in the world.

Why you shouldn’t go to Dubai?

Aside from petty crime such as pickpocketing, scams and sexual harassment, person-on-person crime is not much of a concern for tourists in Dubai. Another thing tourists need to remember is that despite Dubai being moderate and open towards Westerners, it is not a democratic society.

Is moving to Dubai worth it?

Dubai can be a good place for those who love to work in a multicultural environment with numerous opportunities to work in a highly progressing environment. Besides offering good business and career opportunities, this city also possesses a rich history you can explore.

Can a woman work in Dubai?

Can women work in Dubai? A common misconception that people often have is that women can’t work in Dubai. In fact, the opposite is true; women can work in Dubai and many who do would claim the opportunities are better than many places in the West.

What language do they speak in Dubai?

The official language of the United Arab Emirates is Arabic. Modern Standard Arabic is taught in schools, and most native Emiratis speak a dialect of Gulf Arabic that is generally similar to that spoken in surrounding countries.

Can you drink alcohol in Dubai?

Drinking Is A-OK, in the Right Places Tourists are permitted to drink in licensed restaurants, hotels and bars attached to licensed hotels. It is unacceptable and punishable to drink in public places—even beaches. Dubai is incredibly strict about public drunkenness and has zero tolerance for drinking and driving.

Is it boring to live in Dubai?

Yes, it does get boring to live in, I mean Dubai is not that big as you would think, and you won’t be outdoors that much because of its heat and that makes it so small,..

Is Dubai overrated?

The city is clean, safe and highly efficient – in transit, it is definitely worth a look. However, the problems with Dubai run deep, which is why we’re considering it an overrated travel destination. Firstly, those gigantic skyscrapers were built using what critics compare to modern-day slave labour.

What’s it like for a woman to live in Dubai?

Dubai is largely safe for women. Unwanted attention is rare and a recent survey found the UAE to be the safest country in the world, with 96.1% of respondents feeling safe to walk outside alone at night. Although Dubai is quite liberal compared to other areas in the region, there are some strict policies.

Do you have to wear hijab in Dubai?

Dress code in public places in Dubai Women do not have to cover their head, face and hair with a scarf or something similar in public, although Muslim women, particularly Gulf Arabs, do cover their hair, face and head with a scarf for cultural and religious reasons.

Are there poor people in Dubai?

The UAE is one of the top ten richest countries in the world, and yet a large percentage of the population lives in poverty — an estimated 19.5 percent. Poverty in the UAE can be seen in the labor conditions of the working class. Migrants come to Dubai looking for work and send remittances back to their families.

Can I move to Dubai without a job?

Since there is no way for foreigners to receive permanent residency or citizenship in the UAE, there is logically no true Golden Visa. However, through investment into the country, expats can receive 3-year, renewable temporary residency to live abroad long-term in Dubai without having to seek employment.

Things You Should Know Before Moving to Dubai

As a new inhabitant of Dubai, you may take pleasure in the rush and bustle, as well as the always changing skyline.|Hanna Slavinska / Alamy Stock Photo The most crucial piece of advice for anyone relocating to Dubai is to leave all prejudices at home. Remember that you will only be prepared to embark on the thrilling adventure that is living in Dubai if you let go of your preconceived notions about the emirate. In many ways, Dubai is unlike any other city in the world: it is bursting with life, vitality, and surprises around every turn.

The lifestyle is non-stop, and the term “hustle” is commonly used while interacting with friends and acquaintances.

No one can completely escape the hustle and bustle of Dubai, therefore it’s important to be prepared for a busy and sometimes frantic schedule.

Weekends are not observed in the United Arab Emirates on Saturday and Sunday.

  1. Due to the fact that Friday is considered a holy day in Islam, individuals should refrain from working on this day.
  2. courtesy of Delphotos / Alamy Stock Photography People are sometimes unaware of the fact that the cost of living in Dubai is quite expensive.
  3. Although many people who relocate to Dubai believe they will soon be driving a Lamborghini and drinking champagne on a regular basis are mistaken, this is not always the case.
  4. They may appear bizarre at times, such as the prohibition on public displays of affection, but they are an integral aspect of life in Dubai, and breaching one can result in your imprisonment or expulsion.
  5. courtesy of Alessandro Biascioli / Alamy Stock Photography Because expats account for more than 80 percent of Dubai’s population, anyone who relocate here will quickly make friends with people from all over the world.
  6. Having an open mind and avoiding any prejudice against different nations and cultures is essential when visiting this country.
  7. Please be courteous.

Almost every bar and club in the city will have a ladies’ night, which is generally held on a Tuesday and includes free beverages as well as substantial discounts on food and drinks.

Alamy Stock Photo courtesy of Q-Images It is unlikely that you would ever feel the need to be fluent in Arabic if you are relocating to Dubai from another part of the world.

Everyone who lives in Dubai, on the other hand, is familiar with a few important terms from the local language.

As a result, when a buddy says “yalla,” they are requesting that everyone speed up; when someone says “inshallah,” they are expressing their hope for the best outcome from a certain event.

Massive cranes can be found in every corner of the city, working on the latest and greatest thing the world has to offer.

No matter how hard you try to explain what living in Dubai is like to your family and friends in other countries, they will never be able to truly comprehend what it is like to live in this country.

Traveling in the Wild / Alamy Stock Image Those considering relocating to Dubai are likely to have heard about how hot the city is.

With summer temperatures frequently reaching highs of 40 degrees Celsius (115 degrees Fahrenheit), it might seem like you’re trapped inside an oven.

Everyone in the city has access to air conditioning — including bus stations, which are equipped with units.

Picture of the Middle East courtesy of Alamy Stock Photo Brunch is quite popular with Dubai locals.

Whether you’re among colleagues at work, friends at home, or family around the table, this is the most important meal of the day.

Photo courtesy of Robert Harding / Alamy Stock Photo This will come as a surprise to many individuals, especially those who are used to living in cities with excellent public transportation.

The bus is no better – it may take three times longer than taking a cab, which is why virtually everyone has their own vehicle (or several), and there is just too much traffic to make it worthwhile.

Image courtesy of Nino Marcutti / Alamy Stock Photo There will never be a dull moment in Dubai.

This city assures that every single one of its people will have improbable stories to tell, no matter how much fun they are having, how chaotic their lives are, or how insane they are.

Pros and Cons of Moving to Dubai from the UK

For British expats, Dubai is a desirable area to live and work. Every year, hundreds of British citizens travel to Dubai in search of better work opportunities, and it is believed that 240,000 British expats currently live in the country. Dubai is a popular destination for expats from all over the world, with more than 200,000 new residents arriving each year. Many individuals choose to relocate to Dubai and live the expat lifestyle despite the high cost of living for some. The enormous supply of attractive housing units, good wages, and cheap taxes are all factors that encourage people to relocate to Dubai and live the expat lifestyle.

Whatever the reason for your consideration of relocating to Dubai in 2022, the following are some advantages and disadvantages to consider.

The Pros of Moving to Dubai

For eight months out of the year, the weather in Dubai is ideal. The long hot days are dominated by cloudless blue skies, and the nearby mild sea waters are ideal for cooling down in the summer heat.

Job Opportunities

Numerous big worldwide firms have established a presence in Dubai, resulting in numerous employment possibilities for foreigners.

No Income Tax

Every penny of money you generate in Dubai is exempt from taxation.

Good Education

It is important to note that the educational standards for foreign schools in Dubai are quite high. Many of the schools follow the British educational system, with the National Curriculum of England being taught in the elementary schools and IGCSE and A-Level degrees being provided at the upper secondary level in many cases.

Vibrant Social Life

Dubai’s social scene is both diversified and remarkable in every way. Expats who live in Dubai often join a private beach club and spend a significant amount of their non-working hours taking use of all of the amenities that are available, while others join one of the many sports clubs that are available in the emirate. In addition, there is a diverse selection of clubs, pubs, and restaurants to choose from in the evening, with a diverse selection of cuisines to suit every taste and budget.

Accessibility

A unique and diversified social scene characterizes Dubai’s nightlife. Expats who live in Dubai often join a private beach club and spend a significant amount of their non-working hours taking use of all of the amenities that are available, while others join one of the many sports clubs that are available around the emirate. In addition, there is a diverse selection of clubs, pubs, and restaurants to choose from in the evening, with a diverse selection of cuisines to suit every taste and preference.

English is Widely Spoken

Dubai’s social scene is diversified and remarkable. Many expats join a private beach club and spend a significant portion of their non-working hours taking advantage of all of the facilities that the club has to offer, while others join one of the many sports clubs that are available in the emirate of Abu Dhabi.

In addition, there is a diverse selection of clubs, pubs, and restaurants to enjoy in the evening, with a vast variety of cuisines to suit every taste.

High Standard of Living

The social scene in Dubai is diversified and unique. Many expats join a private beach club and spend a significant portion of their non-working hours taking use of all of the facilities they have to offer, while others participate in one of the many sports clubs available in the emirate. In addition, there is a diverse selection of clubs, pubs, and restaurants to choose from in the evening, with a vast variety of cuisines to suit every taste.

Low Transport Costs

Because of the exceptionally low price of gasoline in Dubai, it is quite economical to operate a car in the city. Taxi prices are also reasonably priced, and the government is making a significant investment in modernizing public transit infrastructure.

Accepting of Other Religions

Despite the fact that Islam is the official religion of Dubai, the emirate is extremely accommodating of people of all faiths and beliefs. It is considered to be one of the most moderate places in the world when it comes to implementing Islamic law to everyday life. During Ramadan, expats can purchase alcoholic drinks in Dubai and dine and drink as long as it is still light outside.

The Cons of Moving to Dubai

For expats, especially when they first come in Dubai, the bureaucracy may be a major hassle. Permits are required for a variety of activities in the emirate, including employment, driving, and the purchasing of alcoholic drinks, among others.

Premarital Cohabitation

While Dubai is a liberal country in most respects, there is one area where it might be troublesome for some – it is prohibited for unmarried couples to reside together in the same house or on the same floor.

Rent Can be Expensive

The cost of renting an apartment may be too high if you are moving from a rural location of the United Kingdom rather than from Central London. The average rental price for a one-bedroom apartment in Dubai is around £1,200 (compared to approximately £1,800 in London), while the average rental price for a three-bedroom apartment is approximately £2,200.

Traffic

At times, traffic congestion in Dubai may be quite frustrating.

Intense Heat

Because the weather may be quite hot from June through September, many expats choose to take their vacations during those months and go to a more moderate location. At the end of the day, it is up to you to determine whether or not living in Dubai is for you. Start by contacting us, learning more about our international removals services, or just requesting a quotation to get the ball rolling on your move to Dubai.

20 Reasons Not to Move to Dubai (In No Particular Order)

Because the weather may be quite hot from June to September, many expats choose to take their vacations during those months and go to a more moderate location. The final decision on whether or not living in Dubai is right for you rests with you. Start by contacting us, learning more about our international removals services, or just requesting a quotation to get the ball rolling on your Dubai relocation plans.

1. Try Getting Something Delivered To Your Place

Because there is no standard address system in place, mail-to-door delivery is not an option. In fact, it makes practically everything nearly hard to accomplish. The cab driver, who has just been here for two days and has only learned English through listening to old Beatles recordings, has no idea where your home is. He won’t tell you that, of course; he’ll simply keep phoning and repeating, “All right, all right. “Yeah, that’s right.” When you purchase something that requires delivery, you will not see an address line, but rather a box in which you will be requested to create a map of the location.

Are you unable to create a map? As an example, consider the following: After the airport road, but before the roundabout, I live on a side street that is quiet and peaceful. After you’ve gone passed the mosque, do a U-turn.

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The government of the United Arab Emirates has blocked all websites that it considers to be “offensive” to the “religious, moral, and cultural values” of the country. That’s difficult for a freedom-loving American to accept, but I understand why. Why all VOIP access and related web pages are restricted, on the other hand, is something I don’t understand. I suppose the government is also offended by folks who use low-cost methods to communicate with their family back home. Calls made using the analog service offered by the government-owned telephone monopoly will be charged at a higher rate, although they will be significantly more expensive.

Even though the government claims that voice over internet protocol (VOIP) is forbidden for security reasons, people of communist China and North Korea have access to these low-cost calls.

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3. It Is Hot Here, Like REALLY Hot

Not hot like Florida in July; hot like if you were stranded in a car in Florida in July with enough humidity to make you feel like you are drowning. Heat indexes of 120 degrees with approximately 100 percent humidity are considered extreme. Avoid looking on the wind for assistance. Using this method is the equivalent of directing a hairdryer directly at your face at full intensity. You should imagine that you are pouring fine moon dust-like sand over your head while doing this.

4. Does Anything Even Grow Here?

There are much too few trees, plants, and grass — indeed, there are far too few living things other than us insane people – in the world. Have you ever seen a bird pant? Yes, I have. Human beings were not created to exist in such a hostile environment, in my opinion. If we were, there would be enough of water and shade for everyone. The only vegetation in the area is provided by the roadside gardens established by the government, which is responsible for watering them constantly throughout the day.

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Were you not the one who stated that we should reduce our water use since you were unable to keep up with the demand?

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For starters, there are much too few trees, plants, and grass — in fact, there are far too few living things in general, aside from us insane people. A bird panted once or twice, have you ever seen that? This is something I’ve accomplished. Human beings were not intended to live in such an environment, in my view. The water and shade would be plentiful if we were to camp out there. In this area, the only greenery is provided by the roadside gardens established by the government, which is responsible for watering them constantly throughout the day.

Please accept my sincere gratitude! Were you not the one who stated that we should reduce our water use since you were unable to keep up with the increased demand? A thought occurred to me: let’s all relocate to a location where it is not above 100 degrees outside.

6. Modern-Day Slavery

It is encouraged by this government for companies to employ individuals from other poor countries to come and work in this country. They force them to sign contracts that are ten years in length, and then they confiscate their passports. Despite the fact that snatching passports is technically against the law, the government is aware of the practice and does nothing to enforce the law. They are promised a specific wage, but the corporations fail to inform them that they would be subtracting their cost of living expenses from their paychecks, leaving them essentially destitute – if they choose to pay them at all – as a result.

They are imprisoned when the employees go on strike as a result.

These individuals will never be able to earn enough money to purchase a return ticket home, and even if they do, they will not be able to do so since they will not have their passports.

The kicker is that they are constructing hotels that will cost more to stay in for a single night than they would earn in an entire year, according to Forbes.

7. Things Are Not Cheaper Here

I’m tired of hearing people say things like that. People remark to individuals who worry about the growing expense of living in this nation, “Well, it’s cheaper than your home country or you wouldn’t be here,” according to the letters to the editor page of the newspaper I am reading. The only thing that is less expensive here is labor. Yes, you can hire a cleaner – but a bag of washed lettuce can set you back about $6 in labor costs.

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This is what I perceive to be cheating. Where have all the police officers gone? I traveled around this city for several weeks before I ever came across a police officer. I can assure you that traffic officers are desperately needed here. People behave in a clumsy manner. Turning left from the far right lane is totally legal, however exceeding the speed limit by even a few miles can result in a fine. These cameras are deliberately positioned when you travel down slopes or just before the speed limit changes to prevent accidents.

Fined.

9. What The Hell Are You Wearing?

The clothes that some of these women are wearing is just incomprehensible to me. I realize that you are obligated to dress in a certain manner as part of your faith, but wearing a black robe over your jeans and turtleneck and covering your head while it is 120 degrees outside seems a little excessive.

Some ladies go to the gym dressed in five layers of clothing.sweatpants and t-shirts over sweaters with headscarves, for example. The men’s apparel, on the other hand, is completely logical: white, breezy, and with nothing below except their skivvies.

10. People Stare At You

I’m tired of being gazed at all the time. Men who have never seen a fair-skinned blue-eyed woman before, or who have seen one but believe we are all prostitutes and so it is OK to gaze, look at me. Whether I am fully clothed or with my spouse, they look at me and sometimes even follow me around the room. It’s just frightening, and it’s reduced me to tears on more than one occasion in the past. Men are not the only ones who are gazing at you. My husband and I are having a few drinks at the bar when we are approached by a group of female prostitutes who are enraged that I am intruding on their domain.

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There are prostitutes, there is no doubt about that. There were a ton of them. To clarify, I am not allowed to look at a naked photo of someone on the Internet in my own house, but I am allowed to go out in public and purchase a few for the night? Is that correct?

12. Alcohol Can Only Be Sold In Hotels And a Handful of Private Clubs

To enjoy alcoholic beverages in the privacy of one’s own home, one must possess a valid liquor license. If you want to receive a liquor license, you must first gain written clearance from your supervisor, then verify that you earn a particular amount of money, which affects how much you are permitted to buy, and then submit numerous mug shots (also known as passport photographs) to the state for review. Drinking at home is permitted if you pay the charge as well as the additional 30 percent tax on every purchase.

Why not simply go out to Ajman, where it’s a free-for-all, and fill up the SUV with all of your belongings instead?

It’s strange how things work out.

13. I Have to Ask Permission For Everything!

To get a liquor license, you must first seek permission from your employer. You must also receive permission from your employer if you wish to rent property, use a telephone, or subscribe to satellite television.

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While traveling down the highway at 160 kph, I’ll stop if I see one more youngster standing up and waving to me from the back window. How did seat belts end there in the first place?

15. When is the Weekend Again?

I want to make sure I understand what you’re saying: the weekend used to be Thursday and Friday, but no one took off all of Thursday, only a half-day at the most. However, although though the government declares Friday and Saturday to be weekends, many employees choose to merely take off Friday, while others choose to work a half-day on Thursday, while others choose to work a half-day on Saturday instead. Monday through Friday are considered workdays, with only a sliver of activity completed on Sundays and Monday through Wednesday.

16. There are a Few Satellite Television Operators

Let me clarify: the weekend used to be Thursday and Friday, but no one took off the entire day on Thursday, only a half-day at the most. Although the government now declares Friday and Saturday to be weekends, some individuals only take off Friday, while others may take a half-day on Thursday, and still others may choose to take a half-day on Saturday rather than Friday.

Monday through Friday are considered workdays, with just a sliver of business being completed on Sundays and holidays.

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It is not uncommon to have to drive 10 minutes out of the way in order to perform a U-turn. People are unable to provide instructions the majority of the time (remember reason1), and maps are of little assistance because they do not have road names or have only a few of them. What is the location of interchange number four? The only thing you can do is hope you got on the motorway in the correct spot and start counting because they are not numbered on the freeway. If you miss it, you’ll most likely find up on the other side of town before you have the opportunity to turn around and return.

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Cab drivers work really hard to make a livelihood in this country because, despite the fact that the cost of living is rising, travel by taxi is still quite affordable (see reason7). As a result, you may find yourself with a driver who has had little sleep or had no time to shower for many days. In addition to having just as much difficulty finding their way about as you do, many of these drivers have a driving style reminiscent of a third-world nation and are extremely exhausted. Please remember to strap up for your own protection.

19. Speeding is an Emirati sport and Emirates Road is Just an Extension of the Dubai Autodrome

Cab drivers work really hard to make a livelihood in this country because, despite the fact that the cost of living is rising, travel by taxi is still quite affordable (see reason7). Consequently, it is possible that your chauffeur has had little sleep or had limited opportunities to shower for several days. When you combine the inexperience of many of these drivers with the driving style of a third-world nation and excessive weariness, it’s important to remember to always wear your seat belts for your own protection.

20. Dubai is Far From Environmentally Friendly

You’ve probably wondered how much harm those man-made islands are causing to the fragile maritime environment. A deluge of dredged up sea sand has engulfed coral reefs, seagrass beds, and oyster beds that were formerly part of protected marine areas, causing them to become strangled. When you combine the garbage generated by the construction of structures on top of these sand monsters and the waste generated by the people who live in them with the lack of an effective recycling program, you have the makings of an environmental disaster on your hands.

20 Reasons Not to Move to Dubai (In No Particular Order)

You’ve probably wondered how much damage those man-made islands are causing to the fragile maritime environment. Thousands of tons of dredged-up sea sand have been dumped on coral reefs, seagrasses, and oyster beds that were previously part of protected maritime reserves. When you combine the garbage generated by the construction of buildings on top of these sand monsters and the waste generated by the people who live in them with the lack of an effective recycling program, you have the makings of an environmental disaster.

Take into consideration that there are more gas-guzzling SUVs on the road than fuel-efficient vehicles, plus the necessity for strong air conditioning that operates around the clock, and it becomes clear that the environment is not a concern in the United Arab Emirates.

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What’s it like living and working in Dubai as an American?

What are your plans for residing in Dubai as an American citizen? Around 40,000 individuals from the United States live in the city, with Americans being one of the most significant expat populations in the emirate. 1. The vast majority of American citizens in the United Arab Emirates live in Dubai, with only 10,000 others scattered around the country. If you’re relocating or taking on a long-term work assignment, read our guide on visas, career prospects, and cultural differences before making your decision.

Preparation

If you’re planning a move to Dubai, there are a few things you’ll want to make sure are in order before you go.

Visa

If you are a citizen of the United States going to Dubai, you will require a resident visa as well as a work permit in addition to your initial 30-day entrance permission. If you are planning to remain in the nation for less than one month, you will not be required to submit an application for a visa in advance; visas will be available upon arrival at the airport in the emirate. A work visa, on the other hand, would be required if you want to live in the UAE. Your company will take care of obtaining a visa for you and arranging for you to live in the city.

A tourist visa is required for entry into Dubai, which may be converted into both a work permit and a residency visa later on.

Obtaining a spouse visa, which allows you to remain in the nation with your spouse who is already employed, is another option for those looking to relocate to the city of Dubai.

Accommodation

It’s probable that you’ll want to make arrangements for your housing before you relocate to the nation. When you are not married or living with a close family member, it is unlawful to live with someone of the opposing sex in the United Arab Emirates. Consequently, if you intend to relocate with your spouse but are not married, this is something to take into consideration. Despite the fact that many expats would do so without consequence, if anybody lodges a complaint or the police enter your residence for any reason 2, you might find yourself in serious legal difficulties.

Medication

When traveling to Dubai, it is critical to understand which medications you are permitted to bring with you and which you are not. Some medications that are easily available in the United States may be prohibited in the United Arab Emirates, which has a stringent drug policy 3. The Ministry of Health in the United Arab Emirates must approve the transportation of prescription medications before they may be brought into the country (MoH). If you bring any illicit or regulated substances to the airport without permission, you may be subject to criminal prosecution.

Also available is ourexpat’s guide to medical treatment in Dubai, which provides further information on the health-care system in the United Arab Emirates (remember that international health insurance coverage may be required if moving to the UAE or Dubai).

Is it safe for Americans to live in Dubai?

In most cases, the answer is yes. The crime rate in Dubai is extremely low 4, particularly when it comes to acts of serious crime — but it can be difficult to assess because the United Arab Emirates does not publish its crime statistics. Petty crime, on the other hand, is frequent in large cities, just as it is in any other large metropolis. Pickpocketing, frauds, and sexual harassment should all be avoided at all costs. Shopping malls, airports, hotels, and resorts, among other popular sites, are thoroughly watched, resulting in a reduction in the number of crimes committed.

Laws

As a Westerner, you may discover that relocating to Dubai necessitates a shift in perspective when it comes to cultural differences. Not only are many norms in the United States disapproved of here, but they are also illegal. If you are relocating to Dubai, it is critical for your personal protection to understand what is prohibited by the law. It is against the law to:

  • Live with a person of the opposing sex who is not your husband or a member of your family Participants in public displays of affection are permitted to do so – married couples holding hands is acceptable
  • Don’t be afraid to be homosexual. Being intoxicated in public or drinking and driving are both prohibited. Dress in attire that is deemed to be overly exposing
  • Swearing or making disrespectful hand gestures are prohibited. Without their consent, take photographs of other individuals

Working in Dubai as an American

Expats from the United States can work in Dubai as long as they have the proper visa in place — and they must remain working in order to maintain their visa, unless they are in the nation on a spouse visa. The construction and real estate sectors, tourism and hospitality, technology, and finance are among the most important in Dubai. 5 There is little chance that the process of getting a job in Dubai will be very different from what you are accustomed to. It is, on the other hand, a very competitive environment in which to seek job.

What is the average salary in Dubai?

The average monthly wage in Dubai is AED 16,775 (6,570 dirhams), which is approximately $4,570. The average monthly salary in the United States is $3,900 7. The cost of living in Dubai, on the other hand, is fairly high – albeit not as high as in places such as New York. 8

Taxes

Dubai is frequently referred to be a tax-free sanctuary. However, while you are not required to pay income tax in the UAE, you may be required to do so in the United States. If you generate an income in the emirate, including through the rental of a property you own in Dubai, but you are a tax resident of the United States, you will be required to report your earnings and may be required to pay tax in the United States. More information can be obtained from the United States Embassy 9or the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

Please see our page on Dubai’s taxation for additional information on the subject.

Education

If you’re relocating to Dubai with children, you’ll want to learn about the educational opportunities available in the emirate. Dubai has both public and private education, with private schools accounting for 90 percent of all enrollments. All public schools are exclusively available to UAE natives and are mandatory for Emirati boys and girls aged 5 to 15 who live in the country. Expat children have been eligible to attend public schools in Dubai since 2001, when the country opened its doors to them.

11.

The majority of school weeks run from Sunday through Thursday, in accordance with the working week, with hours varying depending on the institution.

Students who do not have Arab ancestry are expected to attend Arabic language studies until they reach the ninth grade (age 13). Please see our guide here for additional information on Dubai’s educational system and curriculum.

Driving

Drivers in Dubai are required to travel on the right-hand side of the road. With maximum speeds of 160km/h (99mph) on the Abu Dhabi-Al Ain and Sheikh Khalifa roads 12 and 160km/h (99mph) on the Sheikh Khalifa highway 12, the speed limitations in the emirate can be challenging to adjust to. In contrast to the 160km/h restriction, several motorways in Abu Dhabi have had their maximum speeds cut to 110km/h, notably Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Road and Emirates Road. Never drive in Dubai if you have drank alcohol, no matter how small an amount you have consumed.

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For more information about driving in Dubai, please see our driving guide.

American women living in Dubai

A Western lady relocating to Dubai may discover that the city’s customs are much different from those she is accustomed to in her own country. It is recommended that women wear modestly in Dubai, with their shoulders, thighs, and midriffs covered. A minimum monthly wage of AED 10,000 (US$2,723) is required for women who wish to sponsor their family’s immigration to the nation. The minimum pay for males is AED 4,000 (US$1,089) per month. The city’s metro system includes a carriage reserved exclusively for women and children, and women-only lines frequently form outside government buildings.

For a more in-depth look at living as a woman in Dubai and the United Arab Emirates, check out our guide here.

Living in Dubai, UAE: An Expat Guide

Dubai is what you would term an expat hotspot, and it is located in the United Arab Emirates. When expats account for almost 80 percent of the population, it’s hard to imagine anything else happening. If you do not do business in the region, it is possible that you will not even encounter an Emirati throughout your whole stay. So, what is it about Dubai that makes it so popular? Sure, everyone is aware that there is no income tax in Dubai, and that is undoubtedly a huge attraction. However, the most alluring aspect of living in Dubai is the opulent lifestyle that can be had.

Life in Dubai is very high-tech – some would say futuristic – and unquestionably affluent.

However, despite the fact that Dubai was founded in 1833, it was not until the discovery of oil in the 1970s that it had a significant period of growth.

On the international stage, it, on the other hand, frequently stands out on its own.

Having said that, Dubai does not provide citizenship to anyone at any time. So, even if you renew your residency status numerous times and live in Dubai for decades, don’t expect to be able to call yourself an Emerati any time soon.

A Dubai-based expat who has been to 76 countries shares what it’s like to travel the world for work

Markets in the United States are filling up. HMS Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United States. When television producer Jeff Johns relocated to Dubai for the first time in 2014, he had no idea what to expect. He was residing in Thailand when he was approached about a work opportunity that would take him to the United Arab Emirates. Johns is originally from Washington, DC, and had been there for a while. Because to the city’s central position and the flexibility of his employment as a full-time independent producer, he has been able to travel to some of the most stunning locations on the planet.

It was just the previous year that he and his girlfriend, Anne Mugnier, began recording their trips on their blog, “What Doesn’t Suck?

We chatted with Johns to find out more about what it’s like to have a job that allows you to travel the world on a regular basis.

“Dubai is at the center of the world when it comes to places you can travel to. we can visit some insane places on the weekends without having to take extended time out of work,” Johns said. Over 60% of the world’s population lives within an eight-hour fight of the UAE, which means that impromptu trips around the world are common. Here’s the happy couple on a recent weekend trip to Dushanbe, Tajikistan.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United States.

When Johns and Mugnier first met, he promised they would take a trip to Thailand together. Two months later, they were eating scorpions in Bangkok.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United Kingdom.

“Sometimes life in Dubai can feel stale with work and a conservative culture, so being able to jump on a plane andin the middle of a wild beach party is a breath of fresh air,” Johns said.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in New York City.

“People work hard in Dubai. That’s just part of the culture,” Johns said. The typical work week goes from Sunday to Thursday, with most expats spending as many as 12 to 14 hours at the office, according to Johns.

Jeff Johns is a writer who lives in the United States.

Most people don’t mind the long hours though, Johns told us, as the majority of expats go there to make and save money. Plus, they have the ability to travel to exotic destinations and enjoy the area’s vibrant party scene.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United States.

“Most expats will tell you they drink more in Dubai than anywhere they’ve lived,” Johns told us. Dubai has a wild brunch scene, with bars offering “all you can drink” specials and selections of champagnes, liquors, and seafood.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United Kingdom.

“There’s a common misconception that partying and drinking is illegal in Dubai,” Johns said. While this is not necessarily the case, Dubai does have laws surrounding alcohol, and you can be arrested for being under the influence in public. Johns also told us that you need a personal liquor license to have alcohol in your home.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United States. Source:Gov.uk,FoodWine

Johns told us that Dubai’s temperatures can reach as high as 120 degrees in July and August, so many expats often stay indoors or escape to cooler places in the summer. “Restaurants even install huge AC units outside for anyone brave enough to sit in the heat,” Johns said.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United States.

While Dubai can be hot in the summer, the weather from October through April is “nearly perfect,” Johns said. Weekends are often spent on Dubai’s beaches, which offer some of the most vibrantly turquoise waters Johns has ever seen.

Photograph courtesy of Shutterstock/Patryk Kosmider

Plus, prime travel destinations like the Maldives are just a short flight away. “Weekend trips for me used to mean driving from LA to Vegas. Now they mean visiting some of the most exotic beaches on earth, and for very cheap,” he said.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United States.

Thanks to growing opportunities for journalists abroad, Johns gets to spend a lot his time exploring incredible destinations like Mt. Toukbal, which is the highest mountain in Northern Africa. This photo was taken in Morocco while Johns was there producing a segment for an Arabic travel show.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United Kingdom.

Last year, the couple was even invited to a hotel opening in Denmark, where they took the opportunity to explore Copenhagen’s charming Christmas markets.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in New York City.

The duo also works with brands who are looking for video content to highlight tourist attractions. This photo was taken in Sala, Finland, which Johns visited after pitching a blog campaign to their tourism board.

Jeff Johns is a writer who lives in the United States.

To showcase their travel adventures, they also started a video series called “48 Hours in,” where they document the experiences you can have in just two days in a particular place. They’ve already traveled to Beirut, Zanzibar, Iceland, and Tajikistan for the series this year alone.

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United States.

“Once Anne and I made the choice to leave home, the world became much smaller,” Johns said. “A few years ago, moving from Los Angeles to New York seemed like a life-changing event, but now we regularly considering leaving Dubai for Estonia, Thailand, or Singapore.”

Jeff Johns is a writer and a musician who lives in the United Kingdom.

It’s been more than three years since Johns — pictured here in his hometown of Washington, DC — started living as an expat outside of the US, but it’s an experience he doesn’t regret. “Living and working in Dubai has been absolutely fascinating, and I wouldn’t take it back for anything,” Johns said.

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Living in the UAE: 21 Things to Know Before You Move

Whilst the bustling metropolises of Abu Dhabi and Dubai are constantly entertaining, the smaller emirates each have their own distinct charms that are well worth visiting – not least for their incredibly Instagrammable scenery. There’s also Fujairah, which has magnificent countryside and mountains and is home to the Al Badiyah Mosque, which was erected more than 650 years ago and is still in use. In addition to Ajman, which is mostly an agricultural region, there’s also Dubai. Even though foreigners are barred from purchasing land or controlling a majority of any company in the country, they are permitted to participate in a variety of watersports like as windsurfing, water skiing, and diving.

If you want to visit Sharjah, be aware that the law mandates everyone to dress modestly and that drinking in public is prohibited (and only privately if you have a licence).

For those who don’t care about any of that, Sharjah boasts everything from a vintage automobile museum to a castle and an aquarium – and for those who are more interested in exploring nature, there’s a mangrove forest, a coastal promenade, and a stunning bird of prey center to visit.

The emirate is home to a spectacular 18th century fort and ancient buildings, as well as a water park covering 250,000m2 and accommodating 10,000 visitors every day. In total, there are more than 30 rides, slides, and attractions at Dreamland Aqua Park, which is open throughout the year.

What Is It Like To Live And Work In Dubai? 8 Tips For Expats

Working in a foreign country does not feel particularly ‘strange’ to me. It’s been about 14 years since I originally made the decision to relocate overseas, and I haven’t looked back. The fact is that I have spent the most of my adult life living overseas, and it is when I have been abroad that I have achieved my greatest professional success. In recent years, I’ve lived in Egypt, the United Arab Emirates, and most recently Dubai, and I’ve just returned to the United Kingdom for a couple of weeks before moving off to see the rest of the world.

I’m well aware that many people are curious in what it’s like to live as an expat, particularly in the Middle East, where women are allegedly repressed and guys wander about with AK47s.

1. Find a job in Dubai

Although it may appear to be an obvious place to begin, finding employment may not be as straightforward as many individuals believe it to be. My relocation to Dubai was made possible by the opening of a new career opportunity inside the organization. Despite the fact that I was employed by the same firm, I was required to keep my CV up to date, apply through the company’s official channels, and participate in a series of interview sessions. Getting a job in Dubai is not as simple as you may expect, but it is also not as difficult as you might assume.

Check in with yourself to ensure that you are prepared for the recruiting process and that you truly want to relocate to Dubai before applying for a job in Dubai.

2. Learn some Arabic words

Due to the fact that English is the most frequently spoken language in the world, learning Arabic is more out of courtesy than out of a genuine necessity to do so. The majority of the individuals you will meet in Dubai will be from all over the world, including India, the Philippines, and Europe. However, you will also meet other Arabic citizens from countries such as Lebanon, Egypt, and Syria, so having a few Arabic words in your pocket will come in useful. Thanks, hello, and farewell are all words that will always be valuable in every language, regardless of the language in which they are spoken.

3. Dress appropriately

Despite the fact that it appears to be a no-brainer, it is one that many people fail to consider. Whenever I went to the mall to do a little shopping, I made it a point to wear something that covered my shoulders completely. Because Dubai is such a diverse city nowadays, it is not necessarily required to cover one’s shoulders in public areas; yet, I have always thought that doing so was the proper way to dress in public places.

If you are visiting one of Dubai’s public beaches, then swimsuit is, of course, appropriate. However, while seeing other parts of the city, I would always recommend wearing something a little more conservative. Dubai has a zero-tolerance policy regarding topless and naked sunbathing on the beaches.

4. Alcohol

There is a widespread misperception that alcoholic beverages are prohibited in Dubai. This simply isn’t accurate in any way. If you plan on relocating to Dubai, you should consider obtaining an alcohol license. An alcohol license will enable you to purchase alcoholic beverages from any of the alcohol retailers located across the city. However, I did not have an alcohol license during my whole stay in Dubai, despite the fact that alcohol is readily available in the majority of hotels, pubs, lounges, and nightclubs.

I have two bits of advise for people who use alcohol: First and foremost, do not consume alcoholic beverages in public.

If you are discovered with alcohol in public, you will face some very significant punishments, including imprisonment.

The authorities in Dubai have a zero-tolerance policy regarding intoxicated conduct.

5. Culturereligion

According to popular belief, alcohol is strictly prohibited in Dubai. Obviously, this isn’t correct. It is recommended that you obtain an alcohol license before to moving to Dubai. It is possible to purchase alcoholic beverages from any of the alcohol retailers in the city if you have an alcohol license. Due to the fact that alcohol is readily available in most hotels, pubs, lounges, and clubs in Dubai, I did not need an alcohol license during my whole time there. Dubai has a strong drinking culture, as evidenced by the fact that practically every hotel in the city hosts alcoholic Friday brunches, ladies’ evenings, and happy hours on a regular basis.

When going to the beach or having a picnic in the park, for example, refrain from bringing any alcoholic beverages with you to enjoy.

If you have been drinking heavily, whether at a rowdy brunch or on your way home from a late-night night out, you should always attempt to maintain your calm in public and appear as sober as you possibly can (btw,being alcohol-free will dramatically change the way you travel).

Otherwise, get out and experience all of the exciting attractions that Dubai has to offer.

6. Follow local social media and news apps

When it came to keeping up with what was going on in Dubai, social media played an important role for me. There is practically always something going on in Dubai – no matter what time of year it is – and I was fortunate enough to see performances by Ed Sheehan, Guns n Roses, and Coldplay (in Abu Dhabi). Here are a few useful applications and accounts to keep in mind: In addition to providing up-to-date information about forthcoming events in Dubai, including concerts, comedy, opera, and theatre, the Dubai Calendar app allows you to purchase tickets directly from the app store.

In addition to being an excellent source of news, information, and activities, @lovindubai is also a terrific account to follow on Instagram since they are a great source of fun and Dubai comedy tossed in.

Consider using this hashtag to obtain some inspiration if you’re seeking for that ideal Instagram image.

This account will provide you with all of the local information you need, from culinary and retail festivals that take place throughout the year to a nationwide fitness challenge.

7. Join local gymssports groups

I wasn’t really interested in sports or the gym when I was introduced to BARE, a local gym, and a spinning studio by a good friend of mine. Thanks to my friend’s constant insistence that I accompany him to a class or two, I was persuaded to participate. The combination of spinning and BARE nearly killed me, and I couldn’t walk for a week afterward, but I met new friends and ended up returning. The following would be one of the most valuable pieces of advise I could ever provide to anyone. Get out there, sign up, and meet some new people.

8. Just enjoy living and working in Dubai

With everything from grungy live music type pubs to some of the best restaurants and chefs from across the world, Dubai has a diverse nightlife scene to offer. Dubai also boasts a developing culture and artistic scene, with little centers springing up all over the place, giving the city a genuine aspect that it may have lacked up until recently. There is also the ‘older’ side of Dubai, which is well worth discovering on your visit. Visiting Satwa, Al Bastikiya, and Al Fahidi are all excellent destinations for a day trip.

Everyone who travels to Dubai or who wishes to relocate there should spend at least one night in the desert.

See also:  How To Get Around Dubai? (Solution found)

I thoroughly enjoyed my time in Dubai and would not hesitate to return there if the possibility presented itself in the future.

Take a step back and keep an open mind regarding living in the Middle East, despite popular belief and media frenzy.

25 Great Reasons to Move to Dubai and The United Arab Emirates

Recently, Dubai and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) have made news because a large number of celebrities and influencers have relocated there amid the coronavirus lockdown. Yazmin Oukhellou and James Lock from Towie, as well as Ellie Brown from Love Island, are among those who have signed up. This is not a new phenomenon; celebrities have long resided in Dubai, ranging from the Beckhams to Madonna. However, it is not only the wealthy and famous that opt to relocate to Dubai and the United Arab Emirates.

Do you think of gleaming skyscrapers, lovely beaches, or wealthy Sheikhs?

No matter if you are wanting to migrate for employment in Dubai, Abu Dhabi, or one of the lesser-known Emirates, you will find that they all have a number of excellent advantages.

If you decide to make the switch, you’re unlikely to be disappointed, as many of our clients have been. We are certain that the United Arab Emirates is an excellent destination to live and work. and here’s why!

The Top Ten reasons to move to Dubai or Abu Dhabi (UAE)

To get things started, we’re going to provide our top ten reasons for relocating to the United Arab Emirates right away:

1. The professional opportunities are vast

In the United Arab Emirates, earning a living is not the only consideration. It may also be an excellent method to accelerate your professional development, opening the door to new chances and more responsibility. Large, urban cities with booming corporate economies, such as Abu Dhabi and Dubai, are always in need of English-speaking new workers to help them advance their innovation and technology. Dubai, in particular, is fast becoming a worldwide economic centre, and it is already unquestionably the most important commercial and industrial center in the Middle East.

), so go to an international employment agency and think about your next move after you’ve spoken with them.

2. Earnings are tax-free in the UAE

Tax-free incomes in the United Arab Emirates are a significant perk that may seem too good to be true, but it is genuine. Because of this, as well as the absence of any taxes on food, drink or any other items, the UAE can be a very affordable place to live – provided, of course, that you can resist spending on all of the high-end luxury brands that the city is awash with! Maintaining as much frugal a lifestyle as possible will soon accumulate in your savings account. Additionally, they are tax-free.

If you want to reap the greatest benefits, though, you’ll need to get professional guidance on your tax residence so that you don’t end up having to pay tax on your income or capital in your native country.

3. It’s the perfect balance between city and seaside

Situated on the south-eastern coast of the Persian Gulf, the city of Dubai extends along the coastline, with its metropolitan area sandwiched between the sea and the mountain range in the background. Because it is located inside the Arabian Desert, its beautiful sandy beaches, combined with luxury and ultra-modern metropolitan buildings, provide a one-of-a-kind experience. It’s simple to work all day in an office but spend your breaks on a beach, or to trek up a mountain in the morning and then have lunch in the middle of a busy metropolis.

4. It’s the best planned city in the world

Situated on the south-eastern coast of the Persian Gulf, the city of Dubai extends along the coastline, with its metropolitan area sandwiched between the sea and the mountain range in the distance. Its beautiful sandy beaches, along with luxury and ultra-modern urban design, make it a one-of-a-kind experience.

It is located inside the Arabian Desert. It’s simple to work all day in an office but spend your breaks on a beach, or to trek up a mountain in the morning and then have lunch in the middle of a big city. A greater balance between city and country life can’t be found anywhere else.

5. Food is not just an attraction, but a lifestyle…

Eighty percent of the UAE’s present population is made up of expats, and they all yearn for the comforts of home every once and again. This means that the culinary scene in the UAE is genuinely unparalleled when it comes to variety — there isn’t a single place in the world where you won’t find a restaurant devoted to it, allowing you to eat your way around the world without ever having to leave your new home town. But, of course, while you’re in the UAE, you’ll want to enjoy the distinctive flavors and fragrances of Middle Eastern food, which you can find in plenty.

6. Dubai is an international transport hub

As a result of Dubai’s big foreign population, a major airport as well as a variety of transportation options are necessary. The international airport is the third busiest in the world in terms of passenger volume, and because flights to practically all tourist sites are just 5-6 hours away, it is commonly used as a stop-over for long-distance travelers arriving from other countries. You can go on a vacation to either Greece or Goa, and neither will cost you a lot of money or take you too long to complete.

The options are virtually limitless!

7. Safety is paramount

As a result of Dubai’s big foreign population, a major airport as well as a variety of transportation options are necessary. Considering that it is the world’s third busiest airport in terms of passenger traffic, and because flights to practically all tourist locations are just 5-6 hours away, it is commonly used as a stopover for long-distance travelers. You may go on a vacation to either Greece or Goa, and neither will cost you a lot of money or take you too long to complete the journey. So close is the Far East that you can practically touch it, and you’re nearly halfway to Australia.

8. Culture grows and thrives here

As a result of Dubai’s diverse population, residents and tourists are exposed to not just traditional Middle Eastern cultures, faiths, and languages, but also to those from all over the world — all inside the city’s 1500 square miles! It genuinely is a melting pot of globalisation, with a strong sense of belonging to a larger community. Every day offers the opportunity to learn something new and meet someone new.

9. It’s not as restrictive as the press likes to make out!

Lawsuits and terrifyingly tight requirements for people who live and travel in Dubai are frequently reported in the press. But don’t be fooled: life in the United Arab Emirates is not all modest clothing and devout behavior. You can drink alcohol (you just need to obtain an alcohol license from the state), you can dress however you want (with the exception of places of worship and sacred ground, of course), and relationships and dating can take place just as they do at home, with the exception of ‘public displays of affection’ (which are prohibited by law).

10. Properties to live in are beautiful… and often very, very cheap

It’s not often that we describe a collapsed housing market as a positive development, but in Dubai and the United Arab Emirates, it’s a terrific one – especially if you’re thinking about relocating there! The present economy makes purchasing a property in Dubai quite affordable; however, renting is significantly more expensive due to the high cost of living in the city. Most firms will assist new hires in relocating either by paying some advance rent (in most situations, you’ll be asked to pay a year upfront) or by assisting you with a deposit, so make sure to inquire about this during the interview process.

Of course, because housing in the UAE is so new, everything is a brand-new construction with brand-new features and amenities: perfect for a fresh start!

More alternative reasons to live and work in the UAE as an expat

Our top ten list includes the most often cited reasons for people relocating to Dubai and the United Arab Emirates. However, this is only the beginning. There are other additional benefits to living in this area that are only discovered once you make the decision to relocate. We’ve compiled a list of our favorite, sometimes overlooked advantages of living and working in the United Arab Emirates.

11. Camel safaris are commonplace

Despite the fact that Dubai is only 3,500 miles away from the British countryside, the distance feels like a million when you realize that the out-of-town terrain in Dubai is made up entirely of desert! Bedouin camps dot the landscape, which are mostly traversed by camel, and serve as excellent genuine eating places; however, they are only accessible after a rough camel ride.

12. You can ski… in the desert

Avoid letting the heat go to your head by cooling yourself on the slopes! The Mall of the Emirates is home to a whole indoor ski resort that is maintained cold all year long and provides the option to ski five runs as well as several stunt elements without ever leaving the country.

13. The shopping malls are amongst the best in the world

If you’re not putting all of your excess money aside since you’re earning it tax-free, you’re going to have to do some major shopping. A plethora of shopping malls, as well as high streets jam-packed with designer retailers, making Dubai perhaps the finest city in the world for splurging your money.

14. The sun shines all year round

When you relocate to Dubai, you will never have to worry about experiencing an April rain again! There are normally 365 days of sunshine each year, and despite the fact that there are two different seasons, summer and winter, you may actually find the latter to be the most pleasant for being out and about, since the average high temperature is around 22 degrees Celsius. The average temperature throughout the year is around 33 degrees Celsius. a number that we are fortunate to reach for even a single day in the United Kingdom!

15. A strong and stable economy really does rule

To avoid being reliant on oil, the United Arab Emirates has deliberately expanded its economy to include a range of technical and tourism businesses. As a result, a quickly developing and dependable economy with a stable currency was established. Financial interest rates, economic opportunities, and way of life continue to be competitive and favorable for both residents and visitors. Dubai and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) are now firmly recognized as a global center for international commerce and finance.

16. Educational standards are high

The prospect of relocating with children, or of having children in a foreign country, may be stressful because you want them to enjoy the same – if not greater – chances than you did growing up. In Dubai, there are hundreds of international schools, each with strong academic standards, a wide range of extracurricular activities, dual-language possibilities, and favorable rankings in international school rankings. You’ll be spoiled for choice when it comes to educational opportunities, from pre-kindergarten through post-secondary education.

17. Abu Dhabi offers many additional benefits

As an alternative to Dubai, Abu Dhabi provides expats with a plethora of additional perks as well as a distinct charm.

A reduced cost of living and lower rental prices are available; Yas Island has world-class music events; and Corniche Beach offers peace and quiet. Dubai is only an hour and a half away by car or bus.

18. There’s no language barrier

In contrast to many other global economic powerhouses, you are not need to be proficient in another language in order to get by in the United Arab Emirates. Knowing Arabic might be advantageous in some situations, but you’ll most likely pick up the language as you become more familiar with the area. Because English is spoken so extensively, you’ll be hard pressed to find an activity that you can’t accomplish in English, even, of course, among expats who speak other languages as their native tongue.

19. Indexes for Quality of Living rate Dubai and UAE highly

It is not necessary to be proficient in another language to get by in the UAE, unlike many other global corporate powerhouses. Knowing Arabic might be advantageous in some situations, but you’ll most likely pick up the language as you become more acclimated to your new surroundings and environment. Because English is spoken so extensively, you’ll be hard pressed to find an activity that you can’t accomplish in English, even, of course, among expats who speak other languages as their first language.

20. Dubai and the UAE are very child and family friendly

Many expats prefer to relocate with their families, and as a result, there are several amenities and activities to keep them occupied and entertained. Indoor and outdoor activities are plentiful, with everything from Kite Beach to ice rinks, trampoline parks, and clubs to choose from. As for superb theme parks, you’ll be spoiled for choice – Legoland, IMG Worlds of Adventure, OliOli, Aquaventure Waterpark and KidZania are just a few of the attractions that are within easy driving distance of the hotel.

21. The other Emirates are unlocked potential

If you want to go away and take a vacation from the hustle and bustle of Dubai and Abu Dhabi, you don’t have to go very far to discover something new. There are seven Emirates in all, and taking a trip to visit each one might provide a refreshing change of scenery when you’re looking for something different. All of these places have strong English literacy rates and are culturally diverse, so you’ll feel right at home no matter where you go. Although Abu Dhabi is the most well-known and has a large migrant population, you may also travel to Ajman, Fujairah, Ras al Khaimah, Sharjah, and Umm Al Quwain, among other places.

22. Excellent support for Expats

With so many expatriates in the UAE from the United Kingdom and other countries, you’ll have no trouble finding the assistance you require. There are several expat social groups and clubs to join, so you’ll have no trouble making new friends or receiving advise to assist you in settling in more quickly.

23. The new 10 Year Visa and 100% foreign ownership

Given the large number of British and other international expats in the UAE, you will have no trouble finding the help you require. There are several expat social groups and clubs to join, so you’ll have no trouble making new friends or receiving advise to assist you in settling in more effectively.

24. The UAE wants everybody to be happy!

In the United Arab Emirates, happiness is a succession of businesses! Not only do they have a Happiness Minister, but they also have happiness officers, happiness summits, and happiness meters to help them measure their progress toward happiness.

Nobody has been left unturned by the UAE government in its efforts to provide the ideal circumstances for citizens to be happy. So, if happiness is essential to you, the United Arab Emirates may be the place for you to live.

25. Widen your outlook on life

Whether you choose to live in the United Arab Emirates for a few years or make it your permanent home, you will undoubtedly find that your view on life is transformed by your experience there. As you journey through the fascinating world of Arab culture and the exciting world of expat business, you’ll meet new people and discover new ways of life that will change your perspective on the world forever.

Bonus Reason:

Due to the large number of British expats who are relocating to and from the United Arab Emirates, it is comforting to know that exporting your personal things is straightforward and cost efficient. The benefit of this is that you can bring your comforts from home to help you adjust to your new expat life, and you can return home with all of your Arabian mementos, and you can buy conveniently in Dubai. Furthermore, transporting your personal items is something that should be considered. As one responder to the HSBC Expat Explorer suggested: “Shipping as much of your stuff as you need – it may seem pricey at first, but certain essential items that are reasonably inexpensive in the UK might be difficult to buy in other countries.” In the end, the added work and expense surpasses the transportation charges.” In order to obtain further information, please see our removals to Dubai / UAE page or the online cost calculator on our box shipping website.

When will you make your move to the United Arab Emirates?

So there are a plethora of reasons why expats continue to select Dubai and the United Arab Emirates as their new home, and the list could easily go on. On lists and polls year after year, Dubai is consistently ranked as a top destination for expats, presenting a unique chance for anyone looking to start a new life. Given that the population of the United Arab Emirates is estimated to be over 80% foreigners, the sense of community and belonging among those who have relocated there is unrivaled.

Help with moving and shipping to Dubai and the UAE

In summary, there are several reasons why expats continue to pick Dubai and the United Arab Emirates as their new home, and we could go on for hours discussing them. On lists and polls year after year, Dubai is consistently ranked as a top destination for expats, presenting a unique chance for anyone seeking to start a new life. The population of the United Arab Emirates is estimated to be over 80% foreigners, resulting in an unparalleled sense of community and belonging among those who have relocated there, while also maintaining a positive relationship with the native Emiratis, who have fully embraced the development that has taken place in their home country (and is still seeing).

Beautiful videos showing why you should seriously consider a move to Dubai and the UAE!

Depositphotos, iStock, Pexels, Pixabay, and Unsplash are all used as photo sources.

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