What Foreign Aid Do We Give To Dubai? (Solution found)

  • The UAE spends its foreign aid on developmental projects, humanitarian aid and charitable aid. In 2015, the majority of the aid (92 per cent) was disbursed to development projects, with 6.7 per cent disbursed to humanitarian aid and 1.3 per cent disbursed to charitable assistance.

Does the UAE receive foreign aid?

In total, the UAE provided $5.26 billion in assistance across 147 countries. On average, the largest regional recipients of UAE aid were Asia, Africa and Europe between the years 2016 and 2018. In addition to emergency and other humanitarian relief, the UAE provides development aid.

What are the priority areas of the UAE’s foreign aid?

The UAE’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Co-operation launched a five-year strategy for the country’s foreign aid. Under the strategy, covering 2017-2021, the UAE will focus on three key pillars – women’s empowerment and protection, transport and urban infrastructure and technical co-operation.

What countries support UAE?

Multilateral relations UAE has joined the United Nations and the Arab League and has established diplomatic relations with more than 60 countries, including China, Japan, South Korea, Pakistan, Russia, India, Nepal, United States, and most Western European countries.

What country contributes the most to foreign aid?

The United States is a small contributor relative to GNI (0.18% 2016) but is the largest single DAC donor of ODA in 2019 (US$34.6 billion), followed by Germany (0.6% GNI, US$23.8 billion), the United Kingdom (0.7%, US$19.4 billion), Japan (0.2%, US$15.5 billion) and France (0.4%, US$12.2 billion).

How does Dubai help other countries?

The UAE is at the forefront of efforts to eradicate poverty and provide assistance to those in need, including the most vulnerable. In 2016, the UAE’s foreign assistance amounted to $6.05 billion and supported development, humanitarian and charitable programs in many developing countries.

What is the foreign aid policy?

The term foreign aid refers to any type of assistance that one country voluntarily transfers to another, which can take the form of a gift, grant, or loan. U.S. foreign aid usually refers to military and economic assistance provided by the federal government provides to other countries.

Is UAE OECD country?

Abu Dhabi: The UAE is now officially a member of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

How can I get financial help in UAE?

One can do charity in the UAE by setting up a charitable organisation, donating and raising funds, volunteering, paying zakat and sponsoring individuals.

  1. Setting up a charity.
  2. Charitable organisations.
  3. Donating and raising funds.
  4. Paying zakat.
  5. Financial sponsorship to the needy.
  6. Taking care of prisoners.
  7. Report beggars.

Is Saudi Arabia in UAE?

Saudi Arabia maintains an embassy in Abu Dhabi and a consulate in Dubai while the U.A.E. has an embassy in Riyadh and consulate in Jeddah. Both countries are neighbours and as part of the Middle East and Persian Gulf region, share extensive political and cultural ties.

Who is the most powerful person in UAE?

Mohamed bin Zayed was entrusted with most day-to-day decision making of the emirate of Abu Dhabi as the crown prince of Abu Dhabi. In 2019 the New York Times named him as the most powerful Arab ruler and one of the most powerful men on Earth.

Is Dubai a Indian?

Dubai is not in India either. It is very much in the country of The United Arab Emirates which is in the Southeast of the Arabian Peninsula.

Can you give examples of international aid?

The main source of ODA is the bilateral grants from one country to another, while some of the funding is in the form of loans, and often it is channeled by non-governmental organizations and foreign organizations. Countries also offer foreign aid in order to improve their own security.

What are the 5 different types of aid that can be given within a country?

Types of Foreign Aid

  • Bilateral Aid. Assistance given by a government directly to the government of another country is Bilateral Aid.
  • Multilateral Aid.
  • Tied Aid.
  • Project Aid.
  • Military Aid.
  • Voluntary Aid.

What is the most common type of foreign aid?

The most common type of foreign aid is official development assistance (ODA), which is assistance given to promote development and to combat poverty.

Foreign Aid

His Highness Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the founder and former President of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), stated, “Foreign aid and help is one of the fundamental cornerstones of our foreign policy.” Because we feel that there is no meaningful advantage for us from our money unless it also reaches people in need, regardless of their ethnicity or religious views.” A recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) found that the United Arab Emirates (UAE) continues to rank among the world’s greatest suppliers of official development aid (ODA) as a percentage of national revenue.

Country Specific Aid

Yemen Yemen has been the most frequent beneficiary of aid from the United Arab Emirates since 2011. Since 2015, the United Arab Emirates has provided more over $6 billion in humanitarian aid to the people of Yemen, both directly and via other organizations. Yemen received 60,000 doses of COVID-19 vaccination from the United Arab Emirates in response to the COVID-19 epidemic. Amounts of UAE help have been provided for humanitarian and development assistance, as well as for the repair and rebuilding of the country’s infrastructure, which includes 360 educational facilities.

Egypt Since 2015, the UAE has donated more than $10 billion in assistance to Egypt, with $1.28 billion of the total being transferred to Egypt in 2019.

Since 1974, the ADFD has been a catalyst for advancement in Egypt, assisting in the stimulation of economic growth, the development of new firms, and the creation of new employment.

  • Construction of over 60,000 additional dwelling units, as well as supporting infrastructure
  • Grants were made available for the purchase of 600 passenger buses in order to improve public transportation services. Electricity generation at the Banha power plant, which helps to meet the demands of the local community. Khalifa Fund International Outreach Program has provided assistance to roughly 200,000 micro, small, and medium-sized companies (MSMEs). Investing in the construction of wheat silos, which would cut Egypt’s food expenditures while increasing the country’s ability to store grain and avoid wastage. A new library and dormitories for female students have been built at Cairo’s Al Azhar University.

Jordan In 2019, the UAE supplied Jordan with $500.2 million in foreign assistance, with the majority of the funds coming from the Abu Dhabi Fund for Development (ADFD). Foreign aid from the UAE to Jordan in 2019 was primarily directed at helping the country’s general budget. In addition, the UAE made a $333 million deposit in Jordan’s Central Bank to help maintain monetary stability and close the country’s general budget deficit. In addition to food aid programs, energy generation, and educational institutions, the UAE’s foreign aid to Jordan in 2019 covered a variety of other initiatives.

  1. Built 50 miles east of Amman and costing almost $10 million, the 62-acre camp has a capacity of 25,000 residents and is located on 62 acres of land.
  2. Overall, donor groups from the United Arab Emirates have donated more than $680 million in development and humanitarian aid.
  3. Afghanistan received two shipments of medical supplies from the United Arab Emirates in 2020, which helped hundreds of medical workers in their efforts to battle the COVID-19 outbreak in Afghanistan.
  4. Since the beginning of the crisis, the United Arab Emirates has welcomed more than 123,000 Syrians and has contributed more than $750 million to the relief of Syrian refugees.

In 2020, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) will deploy three shipments of medical supplies to Syria to aid in the containment of the COVID-19 epidemic and the support of Syrian medical personnel.

Profile of UAE Aid

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is in the forefront of efforts to reduce poverty and offer aid to those in need, particularly those who are most at risk. A recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) found that the United Arab Emirates (UAE) continues to rank among the world’s greatest suppliers of official development aid (ODA) as a percentage of national revenue. In all, the United Arab Emirates gave $5.26 billion in assistance to 147 different nations. Between 2016 and 2018, Asia, Africa, and Europe were the most frequent recipients of UAE assistance in terms of regional distribution.

On January 1, 2016, the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced the introduction of the UAE Foreign Assistance Policy, which serves as the country’s long-term development cooperation strategy aimed at alleviating poverty and supporting world peace and prosperity.

The Red Crescent Authority is the principal assistance and relief organization in the United Arab Emirates, aside from the government (RCA).

The United Arab Emirates contributes to a number of United Nations development funds, including UNICEF, the United Nations Development Programme, and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The UAE’s aid to foreign countries

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Development Assistance Committee reports that the United Arab Emirates has retained its position as one of the top ten largest donor countries in official development assistance (ODA) for the second consecutive year in 2015. The UAE had the greatest ratio of official development assistance (ODA) to gross national income (GNI) in 2015, at 1.09 percent, with the country’s ODA accounting for AED 16.1 billion and over 52 percent of the aid distributed in the form of grants.

In 2018, the UAE spent more than AED28.5 billion in 42 countries, exceeding the UN’s official development assistance target of 0.7 percent for the sixth year in a row by delivering 0.93 percent of GDP in terms of ODA.

(DAC).

The United Arab Emirates now has a seat at the table in international development forums, and the country is widely recognized as a top-tier contributor across the world. Sites that are related

The UAE’s policy on foreign aid

The assistance provided by the UAE is only for humanitarian purposes. It is not ruled by politics and is not restricted in any way by region, race, color, or religion of the beneficiaries, among other things. This is an example of the idea of tolerance being put into practice in the United Arab Emirates. This policy was established by the late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, the founding President of the United Arab Emirates, who stated that international help and assistance is one of the fundamental foundations of UAE foreign policy.

The UAE Cabinet established the UAE Humanitarian Committee in order to maximize the impact of the country’s international assistance.

Foreign aid and official development assistance

Between 1971 and 2014, government and non-government organizations in the United Arab Emirates gave AED 173 billion in international aid to 178 countries across the world, according to the UAE Interact website. According to the report titled “UAE’s International Aid in 2015,” published by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, the UAE donated AED 32.34 billion (USD 8.8 billion) in foreign aid in the year 2015. This donation was given in the form of foreign aid to 155 nations via the efforts of 40 donor organizations.

  1. The United Arab Emirates uses its foreign assistance to fund development initiatives, humanitarian relief, and charity causes.
  2. It focuses on high-priority areas such as humanitarian assistance, poverty alleviation, support for children, global sectoral programs such as transportation, infrastructure, government support, and women’s empowerment.
  3. Most humanitarian assistance was provided to refugees and internally displaced individuals who were impacted by crises and wars in Syria, Yemen, and Iraq throughout the year 2015.
  4. AED 6.63 billion was distributed to Asian nations.
  5. During 2015, the United Arab Emirates’ foreign aid was consistent with the country’s objective of supporting the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

The United Arab Emirates is now engaging in the attempts to accomplish the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Check out the philanthropic organizations in the United Arab Emirates. The most recent update was made on December 14, 2020.

United Arab Emirates foreign aid – Wikipedia

Foreign support from the United Arab Emirates is supplied in the form of assistance, grants, and loans through both the government and non-governmental organizations, according to the World Bank. These programs, which are offered to other nations, are concerned with healthcare, infrastructure, development, poverty alleviation, disaster relief, refugees, and internally displaced persons.

See also:  Golden Visa Dubai How To Apply? (Solution found)

Objectives

Through the eradication of poverty, the United Arab Emirates seeks to contribute to world peace and security while also ensuring that individuals’ living conditions are improved, regardless of their religious, linguistic, ethnic or racial background. Assistance is offered on a continuous basis to ensure the formation of effective relationships. A commitment to implementing sustainable development projects in order to assist poor nations in meeting their Millennium Development Goals has also been made by the United Arab Emirates (MDGs).

The UAE also wants to concentrate on neglected issues and communities via the publication of this report.

According to the United Arab Emirates interact website

History

Through the eradication of poverty, the United Arab Emirates seeks to contribute to world peace and security while also ensuring that individuals’ living conditions are improved, regardless of their religious, linguistic, ethnic or racial affiliation. To facilitate the formation of effective relationships, assistance is offered on a continuous basis. A commitment to implementing sustainable development projects in order to assist poor nations in meeting their Millennium Development Goals is also a priority for the UAE (MDGs).

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) also intends to focus on neglected issues and communities in their report.

Dubai Interact, according to their official website

Administration

Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan was named Minister of Foreign Affairs in February 2006, replacing Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al Nahyan. Following a reorganization of the cabinet in 2016, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation was established, with one of its many responsibilities being the oversight of the UAE’s development assistance. The UAE’s official development aid (ODA), calculated as a percentage of Gross National Income, was 1.17 percent in 2014 and 1.12 percent in 2016, according to the World Bank.

UAE financing goes beyond the realm of official development assistance and includes a variety of other initiatives. According to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), official development support from the UAE declined by 26.3 percent in 2020 to US$1.7 billion.

Regions

While the United Arab Emirates has provided assistance to a number of other nations, these countries on the two continents have garnered a disproportionate amount of attention.

Africa

Between 1971 and 2014, the United Arab Emirates’ humanitarian and development assistance to Egypt totaled US$12.8 billion. Egypt was the most significant recipient of government development assistance from the United Arab Emirates in 2013. In the same year, an agreement was forged with the goal of bolstering the economy and the banking sector. Many various areas were targeted, including agriculture, transportation, health, education, infrastructure development, water and sanitation, all of which have made significant contributions to Egypt’s recovery.

Sudan

From 2014 to 2015, the UAE’s support to Sudan increased by a factor of seven, with the country receiving US$108.2 million in total. Agriculture, education, and general program aid were among the areas that were targeted. Loans and grants accounted for an equal share of the total help. The majority of the aid supplied to the agriculture sector came from the Abu Dhabi Fund for Development, which helped to secure potable water, expand the size of fields, and generate additional energy through hydroelectric generating in the region.

Asia

Since 2003, the United Arab Emirates’ goal in Afghanistan has been to provide humanitarian assistance to the Afghan people while also maintaining security and assisting with social and economic development in distant places. Funding from the UAE were supplied in the form of grants, with the majority of funds going toward infrastructure development, health, and humanitarian and emergency assistance efforts in Yemen. Specifically for rehabilitation operations, the UAE government has allocated US$30 million, with the UAE Red Crescent contributing US$19 million in local initiatives on its own dime.

Some of the contributions are as follows:

  • 11 schools with a daily enrollment of 300 kids
  • 1 public library with a daily attendance of more than 400 people
  • 6 medical clinics that have served more than 35,000 Afghans There are 38 mosques, each of which can accommodate 300 people. There are 160 wells that provide drinking water.

It was planned that diplomats will launch a number of UAE-backed projects, including humanitarian, educational, and developmental initiatives as part of an aid package in January 2017. Signing an arrangement with Kardan University to give scholarships sponsored by the United Arab Emirates was one special initiative in the city of Kabul that was completed recently. During the tour, five UAE officials were killed in a bomb assault in Kandahar, Afghanistan’s southernmost province, which took place during the trip.

One of the six people slain was the ambassador of the United Arab Emirates to Afghanistan. The leaders of the United Arab Emirates have responded to this act of terrorism by stressing that they would not be deterred and that the UAE’s humanitarian operations will not be curtailed.

Iraq

As part of an assistance package, ambassadors were anticipated to launch a number of UAE-backed projects in January 2017, including humanitarian, educational, and developmental initiatives. Signing a deal with Kardan University to grant scholarships sponsored by the United Arab Emirates was one such endeavor in the Afghan capital of Kabul, which was completed recently. An attack on a UAE delegation in Kandahar, Afghanistan’s southernmost province, resulted in the deaths of five of the delegation.

One of the six people slain was the UAE’s ambassador to Afghanistan.

Jordan

Jordan received US$230.6 million in aid in 2015, with the vast majority (99 percent) of the funds coming in the form of grants. The Abu Dhabi Fund for Development provided US$128 million for transportation and storage, which was specially designated for this purpose. Road expansion, the construction of oil product storage facilities, and the assistance of the Amman Development Pass Project are all examples of improvements. The Emirates Red Crescent was primarily responsible for providing humanitarian assistance through operating the Majeeb Al Fhood camp, which ensured that the requirements of Syrian refugees were met in terms of food, housing, and health care.

Pakistan

The United Arab Emirates has provided assistance to Pakistan through development and humanitarian projects totaling US$320 million over the course of 44 years. The Abu Dhabi Fund for Development and the Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan Foundation made significant contributions to the project. In addition to infrastructure reconstruction, a relationship with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundations has resulted in the delivery and distribution of 20,000 immunizations for Pakistani children against measles and polio, as well as other initiatives.

Syria

The United Arab Emirates has provided help to Pakistan through development and humanitarian projects totaling US$320 million over the course of 44 years. The Abu Dhabi Fund for Development and the Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan Foundation made significant contributions to the project’s development. 20,000 immunizations for Pakistani children against measles and polio have been delivered and distributed as part of a cooperation with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, in addition to infrastructure reconstruction.

Yemen

Yemen has been a top beneficiary of UAE aid since 2011, with US$908 million provided to aid in reconstruction while also assisting other areas such as education, health, food assistance, and economic recovery. Yemen has received US$908 million in aid since 2011. Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan, the President of the United Arab Emirates, has committed to contributing to food relief for one million individuals over the next three years.

More than 75,000 households have benefited from this project, which also has a positive impact on the local economy. Dubai Cares was a major donor to education initiatives, with the hope of benefiting 46,000 students while also increasing the overall quality of education in the city.

References

Quick links to information on UAE development cooperation:* UAE Foreign Aid Policy* UAE Annual Foreign Aid Reports* Project Evaluation Reports* Development Cooperation Procedures and Guideline Documents* Development Cooperation Procedures and Guideline Documents* Summary Figures on the United Arab Emirates’ foreign assistance Assistance for Development: Since its inception in 1971, the United Arab Emirates has provided unconditional foreign aid to developing nations in order to spur economic growth and provide basic social services to populations in need in order to improve the overall quality of life of those who rely on them.

  • In order to decrease poverty, promote peace and prosperity, and establish mutually beneficial economic links with developing nations, the United Arab Emirates’ international assistance is primarily focused on strengthening trade and investment relationships with these countries.
  • Overview The generosity of the UAE towards those in need has long been a distinguishing feature of its international ties.
  • Inspired by the nation’s Arab and Islamic roots, this generosity is a natural outgrowth of the Emirati principle of unconditional support for the whole human race.
  • If there is peace and prosperity throughout our area and the rest of the globe, we will be stronger and more secure.
  • When the United Arab Emirates was founded, it was a developing country, and our experience may serve as an example to others, proving that tremendous growth is achievable with creative leadership, devotion to the interests of the nation and its people, prudent investment, and hard work.
  • When we serve others, we make our own life better.
  • UAE assistance to other countries dates back almost as far as the country itself.

It wasn’t until the late 1970s that civil society groups such as Dar El Ber and the Dubai Charitable Society were formed that the international relief effort began to gain momentum.

See also:  How Much Is Dubai 2 Years Working Visa? (Solution)

Al Maktoum Foundation, Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Establishment, Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Establishment, Al Maktoum Foundation, and Sharjah Charity International were among the organizations involved.

The Office for the Coordination of Foreign Assistance (OCFA) was established by the Cabinet of the United Arab Emirates in 2008, demonstrating the government’s commitment to assisting in the reform of the UAE’s aid sector.

In 2013, the mission of the Organization for Cooperation and Development (OCFA) changed, forcing the establishment of the Ministry of International Cooperation and Development (MICAD), which continues the obligations of the OCFA while also creating the UAE Foreign Assistance Policy.

The UAE Foreign Help Policy was created in 2017 in order to ensure the efficacy of the assistance provided.

The United Arab Emirates has made significant contributions to a wide range of humanitarian crises, both through the international system and through direct help.

As a free zone authority in a key position to house humanitarian groups and commercial enterprises, Dubai founded the International Humanitarian City, establishing it as the world’s largest humanitarian center.

Every year, there are approximately 20 major emergencies as well as hundreds of smaller crises and tragedies, many of which are still underfunded and inadequately handled by the international community.

UAE will further up its humanitarian aid operations in the next years to assist people both at home and throughout the world, according to the UAE Foreign Ministry.

Both direct responses to catastrophes and contributions to multilateral organizations to build the global humanitarian system are part of the UAE’s humanitarian strategy, which is outlined below.

Moreover, by the time our country commemorates the 50th anniversary of our union in 2021, the UAE will have improved its effectiveness as a contributor in addition to increasing its generosity.

Our contributions to the world, as well as our domestic accomplishments, will be recognized, and we will be able to enjoy both our international and domestic triumphs.

UAE’s foreign aid from 2010 to 2021 totalled $56.14bn

Quick links to information on UAE development cooperation:* UAE Foreign Aid Policy* UAE Annual Foreign Aid Reports* Project Evaluation Reports* Development Cooperation Procedures and Guideline Documents* UAE Development Cooperation Procedures and Guideline Documents Summary Figures on the United Arab Emirates’s Foreign Aid Assistance for Development (Aide pour le développement) in anglais Ever since the country’s formation in 1971, the United Arab Emirates has provided unconditional foreign aid to developing nations in order to spur economic progress while also providing basic social services to underserved people in order to enhance their standard of living.

  1. In order to decrease poverty, promote peace and prosperity, and build mutually beneficial economic links with developing nations, the United Arab Emirates’ international assistance is primarily focused on strengthening trade and investment relationships with such countries.
  2. Overview It has always been a distinguishing feature of the UAE’s foreign relations because it is kind to those in need of assistance.
  3. Inspired by the nation’s Arab and Islamic roots, this generosity is a natural outgrowth of the Emirati principle of unwavering support for mankind.
  4. If peace and prosperity prevail throughout our area and the rest of the globe, we will be stronger and safer.
  5. When the United Arab Emirates was founded, it was a developing country, and our experience may serve as an example to others, proving that tremendous growth is achievable with creative leadership, devotion to the interests of the nation and its people, prudent investment, and dedication.
  6. When we serve others, our own lives improve.
  7. As old as the UAE itself, overseas assistance has been provided by the country.

NGOs such as Dar El Ber and the Dubai Charitable Society were among the first to participate in the attempt to send help to developing countries in the late 1970s.

Al Maktoum Foundation, Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Establishment, Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Humanitarian and Charity Establishment, Al Maktoum Foundation, and Sharjah Charity International were among the organizations that received donations.

As a symbol of the UAE government’s commitment to assisting in the development of the UAE assistance industry, the Office for the Coordination of Foreign Aid (OCFA) was established by the Cabinet in 2008.

It was necessary to create the Ministry of International Cooperation and Development (MICAD) in 2013 as a result of changes in the OCFA’s mission.

As of 2016, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation (MICAD) was absorbed into the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, resulting in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation (MOFAIC).

Response to Emergencies and Disasters Humanitarian assistance is provided by the UAE in times of crisis to save lives, alleviate suffering, and maintain human dignity.

Humanitarian help has been offered to individuals in need by more than 40 organizations, foundations, government agencies, and private enterprises across the United Arab Emirates.

In recent years, humanitarian crises have reached previously unimaginable levels.

It is particularly hard hit in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) area, where it has accounted for more than half of the world’s refugees and internally displaced people in recent years, and where earthquakes and flooding are all-too-frequently a part of life.

According to its commitment, the United Arab Emirates would devote at least 15 percent of its overall foreign aid to humanitarian causes, making it one of the most devoted donors to humanitarian assistance.

Prospects for Foreign Assistance from the United Arab Emirates With an eye toward the future, the United Arab Emirates hopes to support national development, humanitarian, and charitable organizations whose work in foreign assistance complements that of the UAE Government and its institutions; expand partnerships with relevant and effective multilateral organizations; and seek out opportunities for private sector engagement as a critical component of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.

After celebrating the 50th anniversary of our union in 2021, the UAE will have improved its effectiveness as a contributor in addition to increasing its generosity.

As a result, Emiratis will have assisted other countries in replicating our progress – and we will be able to celebrate our contributions to the globe alongside our domestic triumphs.

UAE’s foreign aid from 2010 to 2021 totalled AED206 billion: MoFAIC report

ABU DHABI, 24th August, 2021 (WAM) – ABU DHABI, 24th August, 2021 (WAM) – During the period 2010 to 2021, the United Arab Emirates provided foreign aid worth a total of AED206.034 billion (US$56.14 billion), demonstrating the country’s continued support for global efforts to achieve peace and prosperity, as well as for the provision of developmental, humanitarian, and charitable assistance to many developing countries.

In a report published by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation (MoFAIC), it was noted that the UAE has maintained its high rate of official development assistance during this period, and has been ranked the world’s leading development aid donor for four consecutive years, as well as second and fourth in other years during the same period, among other achievements.

  1. Its development assistance accounted for approximately 87.7 percent of its total foreign aid, while humanitarian and charitable relief accounted for 9.9 percent and 2.4 percent of the total value of the country’s foreign aid, respectively.
  2. According to the report, the UAE’s foreign aid was distributed across 25 key sectors and 131 sub-sectors.
  3. Multilateral programs and organizations received approximately 5% of total foreign aid, according to the report.
  4. The UAE provided AED110.467 billion (US$30.1 billion) in foreign aid between 2016 and 2020, the report said.
  5. The report emphasized the UAE’s desire to empower women in priority sectors through its foreign aid policy, which was highlighted in the report.
  6. Women’s empowerment and protection received over AED6.17 billion (US$1.68 billion) in UAE foreign aid between 2016 and 2020, according to the report, accounting for 6.2 percent of the country’s total foreign aid.
  7. Aid shipments from international organizations operating out of Dubai’s International Humanitarian City totaled 955 and were delivered to 177 different countries.
  8. Additionally, the United Arab Emirates has established field hospitals in Jordan, Guinea Conakry, Sudan, Mauritania, Lebanon, and Sierra Leone to assist in the fight against COVID-19 in these countries.
  9. The money was disbursed over three phases from 2018 to 2020, with the funds supporting education in 90 countries worldwide.

Additionally, in July 2021, the United Arab Emirates committed to contributing the same amount over the next five years to support a strategic global partnership plan for education.

What the West doesn’t understand about UAE foreign aid

The United Arab Emirates was the world’s largest overseas donor in 2013, 2014, and 2016, as measured by official development aid as a proportion of gross national income (GNI), disbursing billions of dollars each year. It received the fourth biggest amount of aid per capita in the world in 2015. The vast majority of westerners are unaware of the UAE’s extensive involvement in international charity. In 2015, UAE foreign aid was highlighted as part of an ill-informed campaign to portray the Gulf states as doing little to assist Syrian refugees, although coverage of its assistance by global media sources has been limited since then.

  • Before providing any explanations, it is necessary to take a closer look at the UAE’s development aid program in general.
  • The receivers are predominantly emerging Arab and Islamic nations, such as Egypt, Yemen, and Jordan, who are all in the process of development.
  • With a population of less than three percent of the United States’, the UAE’s gift of $4.4 billion represented more than ten percent of this total.
  • A cargo plane carrying help for victims of Cyclone Nargis arrives at Yangon International Airport early on May 12, 2008, escorted by Myanmar military and “Dubai Cares” staff.

Available data

It is based on publicly accessible information published by the UAE Ministry of Foreign Affairs that these statistics are being presented. Transparency, on the other hand, is a relatively new phenomenon, with the first report issued only a few years ago. Furthermore, while UAE media has lately covered the findings, this was not the case in the years before to their release, indicating that the general lack of knowledge is partly caused by the government’s failure to broadcast it rather than by the unwillingness of media outlets to cover it.

One important aspect is the gap in views toward giving between Muslims and secular westerners.

Muslims, in contrast to current secular charitable initiatives, are urged to make their donations in a discreet manner in order to respect the dignity of the receiver.

Because publicity is a component of corporate social responsibility, a marketing manager in a western nation who engages in the same behavior may find himself or herself in trouble.

Handout images supplied by WAM on March 30, 2016 show boxes of humanitarian assistance stacked at a warehouse near the Emirates Red Crescent headquarters in Abu Dhabi, before being sent to residents of Benghazi, Libya, which is now wracked by civil violence. (AFP)

Incentivizing contributions

The western culture of incentivizing charitable contributions through the provision of publicity, such as elaborate naming ceremonies, and the placement of television cameras in the faces of recipients so that they can publicly express their gratitude to the donor is diametrically opposed to the manner in which Muslims are expected to conduct charitable activities. This might account for at least some of the public’s lack of knowledge of the UAE’s vast overseas assistance operations. However, in addition to humanitarian objectives, the UAE, like other governments, has political and strategic objectives for its overseas assistance.

  • In recent years, however, as a result of the advent of new, non-state security concerns, governments, including the United Arab Emirates, have been under increasing pressure to be more open in their foreign aid programs.
  • Another likely cause is the long-standing antipathy of the western world against the Gulf states.
  • As a result, in areas such as foreign aid and other areas, the western media’s coverage of the Gulf nations is extremely critical, and at times even dramatic.
  • In order to safeguard the dignity of its assistance recipients, however, it must exert considerable effort in order to keep their identities hidden at all times—a policy that secular westerners might consider adopting for ethical reasons.
  • Omar Al-Ubaydli is the Program Director for International and Geopolitical Studies at the Bahrain Center for Strategic, International, and Energy Studies.
  • The National US-Arab Chamber of Commerce employs Ahmed Meshref, an economics undergraduate student at New York University Abu Dhabi who also works as a research associate.
See also:  How Much Gas Coast Is In Dubai? (TOP 5 Tips)

News

The Ministry of International Affairs and International Cooperation in the United Arab Emirates today unveiled a five-year strategy for the country’s foreign aid program. The plan, which will be in effect from 2017 to 2021, will place a strong emphasis on three essential pillars: women’s empowerment and protection, transportation and urban infrastructure, and technological cooperation. The plan was launched at a ceremony held at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation under the patronage of H.H.

A presentation was also given by Al Hashemi, in which she discussed the United Arab Emirates’ foreign assistance strategy, including its vision and key aspects, as well as the major objectives of eradicating poverty and contributing to sustainable development in recipient countries.

Minister Al Hashemi stated that the primary goal of UAE foreign aid is to alleviate poverty and improve the quality of life in underprivileged communities, promote relations between the UAE and other countries, including the recipient countries and other donor countries, and encourage the establishment of economic relations with developing countries based on mutual interests.

  • In addition, she stated that “the introduction of the UAE foreign aid plan is a significant event that marks the completion of years of serious effort on which numerous government ministries, the commercial sector, and civil society organizations have collaborated,” she said.
  • According to the UAE’s commitment to support the goals of sustainable development that the international community has decided to achieve in the next 15 years in order to eradicate poverty, this is the case “Al Hashemi said himself.
  • The prudent leadership of the United Arab Emirates has decided on a clear policy that does not relate humanitarian assistance to the politics of the nations that receive it.
  • Moreover, she stated that the United Arab Emirates’ foreign aid strives to enhance the lives of people by reducing poverty and hunger, supporting programs for child protection and promotion of child welfare, as well as developing and supporting partnerships with partner nations.

Minister Al Hashemi also called for a more imaginative response to global concerns, as well as the development of constructive collaborations with donors and international organizations, in order to maximize the effect of this strategy.

The UAE and Foreign Aid: Supportive Government, Supportive Citizenry

A recent Ipsos survey questioned inhabitants of the world’s 17 nations that provide the most foreign aid what they thought about the support they were receiving. The United Arab Emirates, a tiny state, has for some years taken use of its oil resources to exercise large-state influence in a variety of sectors. It contributes to this endeavour through its large foreign aid program. Additionally, the UAE government has worked hard to win the support of its population for this policy, and poll results suggest that the government does, in fact, enjoy substantial support from the more educated segments of its citizenry when it comes to foreign aid.

  • On a percentage level, the UAE’s contributions to foreign aid surpass those of all other countries in the poll, accounting for 4 percent of the country’s national budget.
  • 197 respondents took part in the Ipsos survey, which was conducted in three of the most significant emirates in the UAE: Abu Dhabi, Dubai, and Sharjah.
  • It is possible that the location and quantity of respondents skewed the results, but the survey is most likely reflective of the more educated, more urbanized, and more affluent segments of the population in general.
  • Emirati officials have persuaded their educated elites that international assistance is a “positive thing.” This is a truth that is regularly reflected in the surveys.
  • Extremely high numbers of people feel that global development activities, such as programs to end poverty, prevent environmental degradation, enhance health care, achieve gender equality, and disseminate education, contribute to global stability and reduce the chance of war.

The UAE’s numbers tend to be significantly higher in many areas than those of the other countries in the survey, whose perceptions of the value of foreign aid have been colored by the frustrations that have resulted from 50 to 70 years of failed aid programs, as well as the fact that more complex societies and economies are more vulnerable to the winds of fortune when compared to a small state with a commodity-based economy, according to the survey.

As an illustration, the vast majority of UAE respondents do not believe that corruption is a serious issue with help, but the vast majority of respondents from other countries believe that corruption is a major problem with aid—undoubtedly a worry borne of personal experience.

Those in the UAE are slightly ambivalent about the notion that the UAE “has a moral duty” to assist those in need; those who respond favorably to that statement account for fewer than half of those who respond negatively.

The replies show reveal a high degree of idealistic optimism, but they also reveal a poor understanding of the UAE’s capacity to provide cash for international help; around 55% of those who responded feel that foreign aid levels should be greater than 20% of the national budget.

All of the responding countries share a general lack of understanding of budgetary issues and foreign aid—the majority of respondents believe that their governments spend more than they actually do—and the UAE’s responses are unique only in that the segment of the population surveyed believes that aid levels should be increased.

Conclusion: A large majority of those who responded said they supported the government’s foreign aid programs.

The results of a more representative sample of respondents from the other four emirates, on the other hand, may be more fascinating, as polling individuals from more conservative areas in the smaller, less urbanized emirates may provide a more nuanced view of the matter.

A high school diploma or its equivalent is held by ninety percent of those questioned, and half of those polled had at least some college education.

Almost half of the population is under the age of 30. It is impossible to tell the difference between earned income from a wage or company and other sources of income derived from government help or subsidies for families based on the income figures.

The UAE is a leader in giving humanitarian aid

The United Arab Emirates’ worldwide reputation in the humanitarian sphere has progressively improved over the past many years, thanks in part to the UAE’s generous disbursement of foreign help. To illustrate, consider the country’s overall foreign assistance contributions in 2018, which exceeded Dh28.5 billion. While this is not surprising, it is a significant evidence of the UAE’s commitment to improving people’s lives. A founding idea credited to Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan, who thought that international aid and assistance were foundations of this country’s foreign policy, is the principle of reciprocity.

“This approach to human development has been central under the leadership of Sheikh Khalifa, and it aspires to promote the welfare of all people,” Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces, said in a statement.

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) was the world’s greatest provider of official development aid in 2017, measured in terms of its national income, when the country spent 1.31 percent of its gross national income (GNI) on international development assistance.

Sweden and Luxembourg were ranked second and third, respectively, by the OECD.

Whether it is providing emergency food supplies in conflict zones or building homes in Mali; funding efforts to combat a cholera epidemic affecting children in Yemen; or making a contribution to education and social support for the 5.5 million people living in camps in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, and occupied Palestine, the United Arab Emirates has paved the way for a more peaceful and sustainable future.

And these critical payments were given to the nations that were in the greatest need – 42 countries, predominantly in Asia and Africa.

It is the sixth consecutive year that the UAE’s overall overseas aid has exceeded the 0.7 percent of GNI recommended by the United Nations as a target for donor countries.

When the United Arab Emirates legitimately claimed comparable accomplishments the previous year, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai, tweeted: “We share our good fortune with all humanity.” It was the sixth time in a row that the United Arab Emirates had been declared the world’s top official development assistance donor in terms of national income, having provided Dh19.3 billion to 147 countries in 2017.

Notably, the UAE’s commitment to increasing its charitable contributions year after year demonstrates a commitment to broadening the area of welfare.

Indeed, these fundamental principles serve as the cornerstone of this country.

Jordan, a renowned receiver of international investment and help, will receive $300 million in funding from the United Arab Emirates’ Abu Dhabi Fund for Development, which was announced yesterday.

From alleviating poverty and hunger to lowering inequities and providing clean water and sanitation, these goals are broad in scope.

The United Arab Emirates has demonstrated that states have a moral obligation to assist those in need by setting an example in humanitarian endeavors. After all, it is this energy that makes a difference in the lives of millions of people.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *