Why It Doesn’T Rain In Dubai? (Best solution)

Rainfall is scarce during the summer months, but the windy conditions ensure there are frequent dust storms. Temperatures regularly climb above 38 °C (100 °F) during this period and fall to around 26 °C (79 °F) overnight. Winter in Dubai begins around the last week of October and lasts until the beginning of April.

  • Why is it not raining in most city areas of UAE? Sharjah / Fujairah – 161 cloud seeding operations carried out so far this year. If you have been wondering why it has been raining heavily in parts of UAE for the last couple of days, the answer is cloud seeding. (Check latest weather forecast)

Why are there no clouds in Dubai?

The UAE has an arid climate with less than 100mm per year of rainfall, a high evaporation rate of surface water and a low groundwater recharge rate.

Why is there no rain in the desert?

Why is there no rain in the desert? A desert is a region of land that is very dry because it receives low amounts of precipitation (usually in the form of rain, but it may be snow, mist or fog), often has little coverage by plants, and in which streams dry up unless they are supplied by water from outside the area.

Why is Dubai so rich?

Its diverse economy makes Dubai one of the richest in the world. Unlike other states in the region, Dubai’s economy doesn’t rely on oil. The growth of its economy comes from business, transportation, tourism and finance. Free trade allowed Dubai to become a wealthy state.

Why is UAE so hot?

The United Arab Emirates (UAE) has a desert climate, characterized by pleasantly mild winters and very hot, sunny summers, with the humidity of the Persian Gulf that makes the heat unbearable. Annual precipitation is almost everywhere below 100 millimeters (4 inches) and is concentrated in the winter months.

Which country has no rain?

The world’s lowest average yearly precipitation in 0.03″ (0.08 cm) during a 59-year period at Arica Chile. Lane notes that no rainfall has ever been recorded at Calama in the Atacama Desert, Chile.

Is there a place on Earth where it has never rained?

It’s literally too windy to snow there, so precipitation gets wicked away as soon as it appears. But the driest non-polar spot on Earth is even more remarkable. There are places in Chile’s Atacama Desert where rain has never been recorded—and yet, there are hundreds of species of vascular plants growing there.

Why does the Sahara get no rain?

Hot, moist air rises into the atmosphere near the Equator. As it approaches the tropics, the air descends and warms up again. The descending air hinders the formation of clouds, so very little rain falls on the land below. The world’s largest hot desert, the Sahara, is a subtropical desert in northern Africa.

Is there poor in Dubai?

The UAE is one of the top ten richest countries in the world, and yet a large percentage of the population lives in poverty — an estimated 19.5 percent. Poverty in the UAE can be seen in the labor conditions of the working class. Migrants come to Dubai looking for work and send remittances back to their families.

Why is Dubai developed so fast?

Coupled with the joining of the newly independent country of Qatar and Dubai to create a new currency, the Riyal, after the devaluation of the Persian Gulf rupee which had been issued by the Government of India, it enabled Dubai to rapidly expand and grow.

Does it snow in Dubai?

Dubai rarely experiences snowfall as temperatures never drop into single-digit figures, even in the coldest of winter months. However, Ras Al Khaimah, a city near Dubai, sometimes experiences snow in mid-January.

Is Dubai safe?

General safety in Dubai There’s not much dispute that Dubai is quite safe for tourists. Dubai is heavily monitored, so violent crime directed at tourists is rare. Most tourist-directed crime in Dubai is likely to be petty stuff like pickpocketing, scams, or sexual harassment.

How does Dubai get water?

There are two main sources for water in the UAE: Ground water and desalinated sea water. Close to 99% of potable drinking water in Dubai comes from its desalination plants. The desalination plants process sea water to make them usable.

Did They Really Make It Rain Over Dubai? Does It Matter?

When I was driving along the Mississippi coast last month, it started to rain. It began by spitting on the windshield, a few drops of rain falling from the sky onto the glass of a 2009 Honda Accord. In moments between frenzied wiper swipes, the bucket toppled, the road vanishing into a smear of light and water falling on the windshield as the bucket tipped. I parked my car in the flooded parking lot of a doughnut store and settled in to watch the show. I was reminded of the rain by an intriguing series of short films released to Instagram last month by the National Center of Meteorology of the United Arab Emirates, which brought back memories of that downpour.

Another depicts cars speeding through heavy rain while palm fronds shiver and the sun peers meekly through clouds, casting the scene in sepia tones.

S.U.Vs are seen navigating what looks to be a bumper-deep lake in a third image.

We may expect to see heat radiating from the tarmac; we might expect to see sand, swept up by the vehicles and glinting in the blinding light of the daytime sun.

  1. The slow pans from side to side that the videographer uses appear to channel our disbelief.
  2. Like every detail is being recorded more than once, so that the proof becomes undeniable, as if it were true.
  3. It’s possible that such stories are a little overstated.
  4. Airplanes have been doing this for years, and unmanned drones have been used to produce electrical charges that have a similar effect in the past year or so.

Whatever power these videos want to convey will always be dwarfed by a greater one.

The United Arab Emirates is investigating this technology because its environment is arid and hot, and it is becoming hotter as the earth warms. This year, temperatures in certain sections of the nation have reached 125 degrees Fahrenheit or more so far. The growing population of the United Arab Emirates further complicates matters: Between 2005 and 2010, it nearly doubled, reaching around 8.5 million, and it is currently hovering around 10 million. More people require more water, yet just 4% of the water available in the United Arab Emirates comes from renewable sources.

  • It’s unclear if the 14 cloudseeding flights done by the United Arab Emirates in the week before the severe rains were even directed towards the clouds that caused them.
  • The similar level of ambiguity permeates the world of technology in general.
  • ) Although there is some evidence that warm-weather clouds can modestly boost snowfall in specific conditions, experimental research on warm-weather clouds has not been definitive due to a variety of factors.
  • Experts are also divided on whether creating rain in this manner would result in less precipitation for places downwind, leading to allegations of rain theft being leveled at all levels.
  • It is not a new pastime for human beings to attempt to conjure rain by calling on the gods.
  • According to the first appearance, what these movies from the United Arab Emirates are attempting to depict is a loop closing: human ingenuity changing the dream of weather manipulation into practical practices of control.
  • After all, the Emirati rulers preside over a sweltering nation whose economy is based on the export of crude oil, which is a source of controversy.
  • The films, like a lot of public relations material, show us something that has miraculous connotations but ends up creating fear instead.
  • But then it dawns on me what the situation is.
  • After watching the films a few times, you’ll see that this truth lurks in the background of each one, casting a shadow over the pictures.
  • It is possible that human engineering of the environment, as well as technology for things like carbon capture, will be critical components of our long-term survival on planet Earth.

However, what may be the most deflating aspect of these videos is what they tell us about how those possibilities will become realities — not as part of some international agreement to limit our damage to the environment, but, perhaps, as a result of unilateral deployment by wealthy nations or billionaire monarchs.

For a brief period, I was enthralled by the sight of rain pelting down on Emirati motorways, accompanied by television broadcasts claiming that the downpour was caused by human activity.

Then the moment was gone, along with the hazy hope that we might be able to halt the terrible sweep of sea and heat that was sweeping across so much life.

I wasn’t staring at a hurricane like the one that was raging in Mississippi at the time.

I was seeking for information. Shutterstock provided the image used in this post. Paul McAdory is a writer and editor originally from Mississippi who now resides in Brooklyn with his family. His most recent article for the magazine was on his pet snake.

It’s so hot in Dubai the government is paying scientists to make it rain

Scientists in one Middle Eastern country are attempting to make it rain in the face of a hotter future, diminishing water supplies, and an increasing population. Literally. This week, meteorological officials in the United Arab Emirates published a video showing automobiles driving through a rainfall in Ras al Khaimah, which is located in the country’s northern region. The storm was the product of one of the United Arab Emirates’ most recent initiatives to enhance rainfall in a desert nation that receives an average of four inches of rain per year.

  • According to the Independent, scientists manufactured rainstorms by shooting drones into the sky, which then blasted clouds with electricity.
  • The bigger raindrops that form as a result of this process fall to the ground rather than evaporating in midair, as is commonly the case in the UAE, where temperatures are high and clouds are abundant.
  • Nicoll is a member of a team of scientists from the University of Reading in England whose study was responsible for the man-made rainstorms that occurred this week.
  • The UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science has invested in at least nine distinct research projects over the previous five years.
  • According to CNN, the drones, which are launched using a catapult, have a flight time of around 40 minutes.
  • In the United Arab Emirates, water is a major concern.
  • Approximately 8.3 million people live in the UAE, which has more than doubled in recent years, according to the government’s 2015 “State of the Environment” report.

The population continued to grow during the next decade, reaching 9.9 million people today.

“The goal of this is to attempt to help with rainfall.” In the United Arab Emirates, it normally rains just a few days out of the year.

Temperatures recently reached 125 degrees in one region.

According to the UAE government, around 70 desalination facilities provide the majority of the country’s drinking water, as well as 42 percent of all the water consumed in the country.

The Washington Post reported in 2016 that government authorities were proposing the construction of a mountain to generate rainfall.

The air can then condense and transform into a liquid, which falls to the ground in the form of rain.

Other proposals for increasing the amount of water available in the UAE have included the construction of a pipeline from Pakistan and the transportation of icebergs from the Arctic.

Dubai is making its own fake rain to beat 122F heat

ClimateNews

The enhanced rain is created using drone technology that unleashes electrical charges into clouds in order for them to clump together and form precipitation

Dubai’s highways are drenched in fake rain. Obtaining a translation in Spanish An eerie monsoon-like downpour drenches a congested roadway, making driving conditions for the stream of SUVs more difficult. On the side of the road, waterfalls arise out of nowhere. Even in areas of Southeast Asia, this would be a normal sight, but this is the United Arab Emirates, which is in the midst of a summer heatwave that has seen temperatures frequently exceed 120 degrees Fahrenheit. According to the National Center of Meteorology of the United Arab Emirates, cloud seeding activities were carried out to boost rainfall in the Gulf country, resulting in increased precipitation.

  • Its cloud seeding efforts are part of a larger effort to manufacture precipitation in the Middle East country, which receives an average of only four inches of rainfall each month.
  • According to the National, the torrential rains prompted waterfalls to develop in the city of Al Ain, making driving conditions dangerous for motorists in the area.
  • One method, which will be tested in the United Arab Emirates, will employ drones to discharge electrical charges into the clouds in order to boost precipitation.
  • Prof.
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When an electrical pulse is applied to the water drops, the project’s goal is to induce them to combine and stay together, “like dry hair on a comb.” The BBC reported that Prof Ambaum stated that “when the drops unite and become large enough, they will fall like rain.” Because it does not necessitate the use of chemicals, applying electrical shocks to clouds is the favored method.

It’s so hot in Dubai that the government is artificially creating rainstorms

With temperatures in Dubai often exceeding 115 degrees Fahrenheit, the government has decided to take action to combat the oppressive heat. Using electrical charges from drones to manipulate the weather and drive rainfall throughout the desert nation, scientists in the United Arab Emirates are making it rain – artificially. Earlier this week, meteorological officials published video footage that showed a rainfall across Ras al Khaimah and a number of other places. Cloud seeding, a novel approach of assisting in the mitigation of drought situations throughout the world, shows promise in that it does not pose as many environmental issues as past methods employing salt flares.

The administration is hoping that frequently zapping clouds to create rain would help to ease some of the country’s yearly heat waves, which are common in the desert region.

Since of the high temperatures in the area, bigger raindrops are required because smaller droplets evaporate before they reach the ground.

As Vice-Chancellor Robert Van de Noort said during the visit, “of course, our power to affect weather is minuscule when compared to the forces of nature.” “We are conscious that we, as a University, have a significant role to play in understanding and preventing the worst consequences of climate change, and we are committed to collaborating with worldwide partners to do so.” Scientists at the institution were given $1.5 million in funding in 2017 for what they call “Rain Enhancement Science,” which is another term for artificially induced rainfall events.

The United Arab Emirates has invested a total of $15 million on rain-making projects as part of the country’s “search to assure water security.” “The water table is dropping dramatically in the United Arab Emirates,” Maarten Ambaum, a professor of meteorology at the University of Reading, told BBC News.

According to the National Center of Meteorology, the United Arab Emirates is one of the first countries in the Gulf area to employ cloud seeding technology.

Sophie Lewis is a young woman who lives in the United Kingdom.

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EMERGENCY COMPONENT – NATIONAL

It has been a complete year since our Weather Generator Station was turned off! As Magnetic Technology Company -Dubai, we have been using a particular ION Weather Generator for the past 12 years to accelerate the production of rain clouds and cleanse the environment in the city of Dubai. It is believed that this Weather Generator was responsible for not only the development of strong rain clouds, but also for a significant increase in the amount of rain that fell throughout the Arabian Desert during that period.

  1. It was a year ago today that we turned off the Dubai Weather Generator.
  2. The quantity of precipitation in this year 2020 has decreased substantially when compared to the previous two years, when our Weather Generator was performing at its peak!
  3. Because there was no cloudiness, there was no need for a cloud seeding firm to operate.
  4. We are fully prepared to provide you with all of the proof!
  5. CEO Junaid Khoory is the President and CEO of Magnetic Technologies.
  6. We respectfully request that the government give careful consideration to our idea, as well as a fair assessment of the feasibility of employing the weather generator in the interests of the country and the area as a whole!

Has UAE cloud-seeding gone too far?

The sky is being built up in anticipation of rain. In 2019, the United Arab Emirates “seeded” clouds more than 185 times. (Image courtesy of Getty Images / WIRED) The United Arab Emirates, which is home to a portion of the world’s biggest sand desert and has summer temperatures that often exceed 40 degrees Celsius, is not typically associated with rain. However, in the country’s last few months of 2019, severe downpours forced residents to wade through flooded streets, employees to pump water from a flooded residential neighborhood, and rainfall to run down escalators at the world-famous Dubai Mall, among other things.

  1. What is the goal?
  2. In October, the state Rain Enhancement Research Program tweeted that the National Center of Meteorology (NCM) had completed eight cloud-seeding operations in a matter of days, according to the state Rain Enhancement Research Program.
  3. Once again in November, severe rains were connected to cloud-seeding activities, this time by the National Climate Assessment, which tweeted about the circumstances with the hashtagCloud Seeding on a regular basis throughout the month.
  4. Is it conceivable that cloud seeding, in a place where fresh water is in scarce supply, is really causing an excessive amount of rain to fall?
  5. “We are merely increasing the quantity of rain falling; we are not causing floods.” “We even avoid seeding particular clouds because it would be too perilous for the aircraft to penetrate them,” he said in an interview with WIRED in November.
  6. These are the kinds of clouds that we want to avoid.

We are employing extremely advanced radars that cover the whole atmosphere of the United Arab Emirates, and we are closely monitoring every droplet of rain that falls from clouds in the UAE.” It is difficult to be assured of anything in the case of cloud seeding, however, according to certain other professionals.

Furthermore, the problem, statistically speaking, is that there is so much natural variability in precipitation; particularly in warmer clouds, such as those that are being attempted to seed in the UAE, there is a lot of variation that occurs naturally and that we as scientists cannot always explain.” A project called “Seeded and Natural Orographic Wintertime Clouds: The Idaho Experiment,” or SNOWIE, was launched in 2017 by French and a team of scientists.

  • It was one of only a handful of experiments recognized by the atmospheric science community as demonstrating that cloud seeding can be effective in terms of causing precipitation to fall out of a cloud—in this case, snow.
  • “We haven’t been able to demonstrate that cloud seeding can create enough precipitation to have a significant influence; that you can raise the quantity of snow across a mountain range by, say, 5 or 10 percent over the course of a season,” French explains.
  • However, as a scientist, I believe that we have not yet reached that position.” In agreement with this statement was Paul Connolly, a researcher in the department of earth and environmental sciences at the University of Manchester who examined a paper on the SNOWIE project.
  • “From a distance, I’d say there’s a dearth of evidence that works in the majority of situations,” he adds.
  • In addition, these components aid in the creation of ice crystals that will eventually result in the development of rain or snow.
  • As a result of the high unpredictability, it’s difficult to be positive that a change you witness is due to seeding and not to some other natural variation, according to Dr.
  • The question is, what happened to the severe downpours that caused floods in the United Arab Emirates?
  • “An additional 30 percent of heavy precipitation might result in a flood,” he warns in the presence of dense clouds.
  • So, for example, if you seed a region and the rain comes down much more quickly than it would otherwise, but there isn’t much more, it may have an influence as well.

Aridity is a major factor in the UAE’s water supply, according to the UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science, which notes that the country “has an extremely dry climate with less than 100 millimeters of precipitation per year, a high evaporation rate of surface water, and a low groundwater recharge rate that is far below the country’s total annual water consumption.” Since 2016, the initiative has granted funds totalling $15 million to nine worldwide scientists who are doing research in this sector in an effort to discover novel methods of “creating” rain and boosting the amount of accessible drinking water.

Professor Linda Zou is one of those experts, and her work with titanium dioxide nanoparticle technology has given some in the United Arab Emirates hope for more successful cloud seeding in the future.

As reported by the UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science, Zou has already submitted two patent applications pertaining to her research with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

This results in a greater quantity of water droplets during rainfall, which can be up to three times greater than with the old approach.” While laboratory testing and analysis have so far informed this assessment, the coated salt crystals are now being subjected to field testing under natural conditions.

As explained by Connolly, who himself conducted modeling based on titanium dioxide nanoparticles being used as the sole cloud seeding material, the attraction of using titanium dioxide nanoparticles for warm cloud seeding is the fact that they take up water at lower humidities than normal particles in clouds.

Farrah, on the other hand, is convinced that the substance produced by Professor Zou will prove to be different: “For sure, we’ll have the findings that this material played a good part.

Humans are at risk when nanoparticles are present in the air and breathed, which is particularly dangerous in the workplace, whereas algae and animals are at risk when nanoparticles infiltrate ecosystems, which can happen when wastewater is discharged into the environment.

According to Simonin, a researcher at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, “soil microorganisms that are necessary for soil fertility, as they recycle nutrients that are important for plant growth,” are particularly significant (INRA).

“There is currently no conclusive evidence regarding the safe dose of TiO2 nanoparticles.” Connolly acknowledged that titanium dioxide nanoparticles can accumulate due to the fact that they do not react with many other substances, but he said that their use in cloud seeding was something “to look at as a potential concern,” rather than something that was “definitely going to be a problem” because cloud seeding operations are likely to use only small amounts.

  • UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science, for its part, stated that the UAE’s use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in cloud seeding posed no environmental risks because the volume of titanium dioxide nanoparticles used in cloud seeding “is very minimal.
  • The fact remains that, while the chemical is present in many products ranging from sunscreen and face powder to coffee creamer and sweets, there appears to be a distinct lack of evidence regarding the concentrations at which the substance is safe.
  • Further research was needed, she stated, particularly in the geographical region around the United Arab Emirates.
  • To yet, cloud seeding has not been conducted on such a large scale that potentially harmful elements employed in the process have accumulated on the ground in concentrations exceeding WHO guidelines, according to Flossmann of the World Meteorological Organization.
  • They are toxic, and they have the potential to accumulate due to the fact that they are extremely difficult to resorb or degrade.
  • Countries are able to do more or less anything they want to a certain extent.
  • It is her team’s recommendation that the World Meteorological Organization consider developing such worldwide regulatory norms.
  • For the time being, I believe that such charges are not acceptable because, with a 15 percent fee, it is not as if you are depleting the cloud completely.

Drought relief has been achieved through the use of cloud seeding in Thailand. (Image courtesy of Getty Images)

How cloud-seeding works

The sky is being built up in preparation for the coming of the storm. Over 185 times in 2019, the UAE “seeded” clouds with seeds. Image courtesy of Getty Images and Wired. In spite of the fact that the United Arab Emirates is home to a portion of the world’s largest sand desert and summer temperatures that regularly exceed 40 degrees Celsius, the country is not known for receiving much rainfall. However, in the country’s final few months of 2019, torrential downpours forced people to wade through flooded streets, workers to pump water from a flooded residential area, and rainwater to flow down escalators at the world-famous Dubai Mall, among other incidents.

  1. How do you achieve your goals?
  2. In October, the state Rain Enhancement Research Program tweeted that the National Center of Meteorology (NCM) had conducted eight cloud-seeding operations in a matter of days, according to the state Rain Enhancement Research Program’s Twitter account.
  3. Once again in November, heavy rains were linked to cloud-seeding operations, this time by the National Climate Assessment, which tweeted about the conditions with the hashtagCloud Seeding on a regular basis during that period.
  4. Because of a worsening water scarcity crisis, the United Arab Emirates has emerged as something of a Middle East pioneer in the field of “rainmaking,” which is the science of creating rain.
  5. And so, is it possible that cloud seeding could actually be causing an excessive amount of rain to fall in a country where fresh water is in short supply.
  6. In order to prevent floods, we only increase the amount of rain falling.
  7. That is why we stay away from these kinds of clouds.
  8. We are employing extremely sophisticated radars that cover the entire atmosphere of the United Arab Emirates, and we are closely monitoring every droplet of rain that falls from clouds in the UAE.
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Jeff French, assistant professor of atmospheric science at the University of Wyoming in the United States, says, “It’s a really difficult thing to do.” The attempt to link precipitation directly to cloud seeding has been ongoing for the past 60 years.” Furthermore, the problem, statistically speaking, is that there is so much natural variability in precipitation; particularly in warmer clouds, such as those that are being attempted to seed in the UAE, there is a lot of variation that occurs naturally and that we as scientists are unable to fully understand.

  • A project called “Seeded and Natural Orographic Wintertime Clouds: The Idaho Experiment,” or SNOWIE, was launched in 2017 by French and a team of scientists.
  • ***** Nevertheless, even SNOWIE was limited in his actions.
  • The goal is to be able to say something definitive like that in the near future.
  • The fact that there was an effect in these winter precipitation clouds, he said, was “very convincing,” but he cautioned that the effect was limited in scope.

Without seeding an area, you’ll never know what would have happened, and you’ll never be able to say with certainty what might have happened.” As a result, the SNOWIE project did not examine the method of cloud seeding employed by the UAE, but rather the procedure used most frequently to create so-called “cold” clouds, which entails seeding with “ice-nucleating” materials, in this case silver iodide.

  1. As a result of these materials, ice crystals are formed, which fall to the ground as rainfall or snow.
  2. “Because there is so much variability, it is very difficult to be certain that a change that you see is truly due to seeding and not to some natural variability,” Flossmann explains.
  3. Cloud seeding, according to Flossmann, is unlikely to have caused them: “It’s more likely that natural variability occurred at the same time.” It has never been documented before that such massive effects could occur.”.
  4. “An additional 30% of heavy precipitation might result in a flood,” he warns in the presence of dense clouds.
  5. Because I’ve heard that’s an essential factor in floods as well; it’s not only about how much precipitation you get over a long period of time; it’s also about how swiftly the cloud pours when it rains in the rain.
  6. Actually, I’m not sure I’d want to rule anything out.” Even while some UAE residents may have complained about too much rain in late 2019, the country as a whole is experiencing the polar opposite of that issue.
  7. Professor Linda Zou is one of those experts, and her work with titanium dioxide nanoparticle technology has given some in the United Arab Emirates hope for more successful cloud-seeding techniques.

As reported by the UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science, Zou has already submitted two patent applications pertaining to her findings to the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

According to Alya Al-Mazroui, the program’s director, the novel substance produced by Zou “extensions the condensation process by increasing the size of cloud droplets more than the usual material.

According to Farrah of the NCM, the substance had been shipped to the United States for testing in the state of Texas, among other places.

Connolly himself has conducted modeling studies based on titanium dioxide nanoparticles being used as the sole cloud seeding material.

Farrah, on the other hand, is convinced that the substance produced by Professor Zou will prove to be different: “For sure, we’ll have the findings that this material played a good part.

Humans are at risk when nanoparticles are present in the air and breathed, which is particularly dangerous in the workplace, whereas algae and animals are at risk when nanoparticles infiltrate ecosystems, which can happen when wastewater is discharged into a water supply system.

This is especially true of “soil microbes, which are critical for soil fertility because they recycle nutrients that are needed for plant growth,” according to Simonin, a researcher at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research (INRA).

Acknowledging that titanium dioxide nanoparticles can accumulate due to the fact that they do not react with much, Connolly stated that they should be “looked at as a potential concern,” but that he could not say that their use in cloud seeding was “definitely going to be a problem” because “cloud seeding operations are likely only using small amounts.” According to the UAE Research Program for Rain Enhancement Science, the use of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in cloud seeding poses no environmental risks because the volume of titanium dioxide nanoparticles used in cloud seeding “is very minimal.

  • about 3 percent of the composition of the cloud-seeding materials,” according to the program.
  • The fact is that, while the chemical is present in many products ranging from sunscreen and face powder to coffee creamer and sweets, there appears to be a significant dearth of information about the doses at which the chemical is safe to consume.
  • According to Simonin, “I would be concerned about a wide-scale use like cloud seeding that would have an impact on huge areas, particularly if they were agricultural zones,” until more extensive study into the ecotoxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles is conducted.
  • Despite the fact that titanium dioxide nanoparticles are not the first potentially harmful substance to be employed in cloud seeding, silver iodide, the most frequent element used in cloud seeding, is likewise poisonous at high quantities.
  • It is true that some people are concerned about the potential toxicity of these items if they become popular and are used on a regular basis over an extended length of time.
  • Because of this, they collect in the soil.” It is surprising that, considering the prominence that weather and climate have gained on news agendas and in political debate, there is currently no worldwide organization that governs weather modification activities.
  • According to Flossmann, this has turned cloud-seeding into a battleground in the water wars and other geopolitical conflicts that are presently engulfing the Middle East and other parts of the globe.
  • As time passes, there are more and more difficulties like ‘you’re using all of my water.’ These themes, such as Iran denouncing Israel and so on, are broadcast in the media, according to her.
  • The fact is that many difficulties have arisen, including in nations such as the United States and Spain.” For the time being, it appears that the numerous controversies concerning cloud seeding will continue to rage.

Thai authorities have turned to cloud seeding to combat drought. Images courtesy of Getty Illustrations

Dubai makes fake rain created by ‘shocking’ clouds to tackle 50C heatwave

The United Arab Emirates is sizzling in temperatures of up to 50 degrees Celsius, and the city of Dubai is testing a rain-inducing device that involves drones releasing electrical charges into clouds, causing them to make rain. Video is loading; but, it is now unavailable. Artificial rain was manufactured in Dubai by employing a technique known as “cloud shocking.” Due to the fact that Mother Nature has been uncooperative thus far, Dubai has devised its own method of generating rain in the midst of a 50-degree heatwave.

  1. There are multi-million dollar measures underway to combat the blazing temperatures and increase the meager average annual rainfall in the Middle Eastern country, which is now at four inches.
  2. As a result, the country’s National Center of Meteorology has begun testing drone technology, which releases electrical charges into the atmosphere.
  3. Please let us know in the comments section below.
  4. Because it does not require the use of pesticides, the drone system is considered to be a more environmentally friendly alternative.
  5. Amazing film published by the National Communications Ministry shows monsoon-like downpours smashing automobiles as they travel along motorways in sights that would normally only be seen in South East Asian nations – but not in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).
  6. As the technique proved to be efficient, heavy rain can be seen smashing automobiles in the streets.
  7. It was at one time so intense that some questioned whether the technology had gone too far, as it had resulted in floods, according to the website Wirecutter.
  8. With the Mirror’s free newsletters, you can receive the latest news straight to your inbox.

In an interview with the BBC earlier this year, he stated that “the water table is lowering substantially in the United Arab Emirates, and the aim of this is to try to help with rainfall.” He claims that the UAE has enough clouds for the technology, which he describes as “dry hair to a comb,” to function well.

The reason there’s so much rain in the UAE

Weather in Dubai is one of those things in life that no one can anticipate, and rain is one of those things. Residents of the United Arab Emirates normally enjoy sunshine all year, with the exception of a few brief heatwaves in the summer. Furthermore, due to the unique character of rain, the sight of merely a few drops may capture the attention of everyone and produce local news headlines at the same time. However, with the aid of technology, the United Arab Emirates has been able to increase the likelihood of rain occurring as well as the amount of rain that has collected in the emirates.

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Other months of 2017 had varying amounts of rain in various locations of the United Arab Emirates.” With the support of science, the NCM has been able to assist mother nature in her efforts to increase yearly rainfall through its cloud seeding programme during the previous few years.

What is cloud seeding?

UAE was one of the first countries in the Arabian Gulf to employ cloud seeding technology, and it remains one of the most advanced. Initial phases of the project began at the end of 1990, and by the end of 2000, the project had been completed in collaboration with a number of organizations and institutions, including the United States Space Agency (NASA) and other international partners. It is currently regular practice for the NCM’s cloud seeding department to make use of a sophisticated weather surveillance radar (WSR), which is in charge of continuously monitoring the atmospheric pressure throughout the day and night.

As cumulus cloud formations are the only ones that can be used for cloud seeding operations, the NCM will launch aircrafts as soon as they are detected and shoot salt crystals – combined with magnesium, sodium chloride, and potassium chloride – that are fired into the atmosphere.

Our cloud seeding operations are carried out by a team of six pilots and four planes, who combined flew 242 flights in 2017.

The goal of the cloud seeding effort, according to Al Obeidli, is to “increase the amount of rain droplet that falls on the earth.” He went on to explain how the operation works.

He also stressed that no harmful chemicals were used in the process.

It works by sending the aircraft to the cloud and targets the updraft to seed it, which helps the small rain droplets to be bigger and heavier.

When it comes to cloud seeding technology, the United Arab Emirates was one of the early adopters in the Arabian Gulf region. Initial phases of the project began at the end of 1990, and by the end of 2000, the project had been completed in collaboration with a number of organizations and institutions, including the United States Space Agency (NASA) and other international partners and organizations. Using a sophisticated weather surveillance radar (WSR), which is responsible for monitoring the atmospheric pressure around the clock, has become regular procedure for the NCM’s cloud seeding unit.

As cumulus cloud formations are the only ones that can be used for cloud seeding missions, the NCM will launch aircrafts as soon as they are detected and shoot salt crystals – combined with magnesium, sodium chloride, and potassium chloride – that are fired into the atmosphere.

“We have six pilots and four planes to carry out cloud seeding operations, and they completed 242 flights in all in 2017.” In the United Arab Emirates, the biggest amount of rainfall recorded in 24 hours was 128.8 mm on December 17, 2017 at Fujairah Port, whereas the highest mean amount of rainfall recorded in the UAE was 34mm in March of 2017,” stated Al Obeidli, referring to the NCM weather station network.

In his explanation of how the cloud seeding initiative works, Al Obeidli stated that the goal is to “increase the amount of rain droplet that falls on the land.” In his explanation, Al Obeidli noted that the process works by sending the aircraft to the cloud and aiming it at the updraft to seed it, which causes the small rain droplets to grow larger and heavier, allowing them to fall to the ground.

He also stressed that no harmful chemicals were used in the process.

We are proud of what we have achieved so far in this vital area, and we will continue our pursuit to achieve more

The NCM’s director, Dr. Abdullah Al Mandous, says: As a result of the collaborative scientific initiative, the accuracy of weather forecasts connected to cloud seeding activities in the United Arab Emirates will be improved.

International achievements in rain-making

There are no seasons in which the cloud seeding mission can be completed; it may be completed at any time of year whenever seedable clouds are spotted. Image courtesy of Supplied A number of other nations have also been actively seeking the improvement of rain, with the most notable examples being those in the following regions:

  • China. The United States now has a widespread cloud seeding system in place. Indian cloud seeding missions were used to enhance precipitation in regions that were experiencing drought and to lower the size of hailstones that developed during thunderstorms
  • These missions were carried out in India. Rain augmentation activities were carried out successfully in the states of Andhra Pradesh and Maharashtra, as well as in Thailand, to increase rainfall levels. Increased rainfall in water basins and agricultural regions was achieved by the employment of the rain-enhancement method.

The National Centre of Meteorology of the United Arab Emirates provided the data.

r/dubai – Why it hasn’t rained this year? No rain predicted in January too!

Level 1Y’all aren’t cleaning your automobiles too oftenlevel 2about a year ago The Nissan Sunny is my ideal automobile. Since the beginning of this month, my father has neglected to wash his automobile. His vehicle now appears to have been discovered in the bottom of a lake. level 2This is exactly why I check the weather forecast every now and again. a second-grade education Hello there, dude. Don’t say anything like that. I haven’t had time to wash my car yet. The trip was supposed to take place this weekend.

  • I don’t recall seeing many foggy days in recent memory.
  • I recall that it used to rain in November and December for the previous three or four years.
  • level 1 There will be no rain this year.
  • The temperature is dropping every year, so I’m not sure, but didn’t anything similar happen in Al Ain?
  • Maybe the next year.
  • You charged me 5 Dhs for crossing last winter, so if it comes down to it, charge less this year if that’s the case.
  • Generally speaking, cloud seeding does not function very well; it only enhances the odds of rain by a given proportion.
  • We just didn’t have enough clouds to provide enough precipitation to be able to sprinkle the ground with seeds.
  • 1st grade Let’s say the tourism business has suffered, and the government has suffered as a result.
  • But it is not only about having clouds to seed with level 1 to keep my apartment dry for at least one year that cloud seeding is important.
  • 1st grade With everything that is going on, I am genuinely relieved that there will be no rain this year.

Just love the cooler weather; the early mornings and late nights are perfect for going for a walk in the countryside. a second-grade education Put up your hands and wait for more rain to fall. Temps are plunging, and I can only image what summer temperatures will be like in 2020.

Does it rain in Dubai

It does rain in Dubai, to be sure. Dubai is the only country that can guarantee pleasant weather throughout the year. With the exception of the ridiculously high temperatures in the summer (40 degrees Celsius or more), you really do have excellent weather to make the most of your time lounging on the beach. You can imagine how surprised I was when I woke up to three days of severe rain last week! Sheikh Zayed Road, Abu Dhabi (Photo Credit, Bayut.com) Don’t get me wrong, it does happen, although infrequently.

  • In Dubai, I’ve even witnessed some spectacular thunderstorms, but three days?
  • But why is this so?
  • It causes rain to fall!
  • In order to generate the rain, they spray chemicals into the air, which causes the rain to fall artificially.
  • It was unquestionably one of the things that many people had previously believed to be part of a conspiracy.
  • First and foremost, there are the roads.
  • It is very uncommon for schools to be closed in Dubai, much to the joy of many instructors who work in the country.

However, in the past, rainy days were similar to snow days in the United Kingdom: school was cancelled, and it was time to watch Netflix to avoid cluttering up the roads.

Then there’s the matter of the dirt.

It is used to transport sand.

Rain in other locations as a result of cloud seeding, on the other hand, is rather extraordinary.

Because of the tremendous rain that fell for a couple of days, an entirely new natural beauty was produced in the nation, including a spectacular waterfall, which you can see in the photo above.

who would have imagined it would be so interesting to observe?

The UAE Is Using Drones to Zap Clouds With Electricity and Make It Rain

Extreme weather occurrences seem to be becoming more commonplace in recent years. In instance, major flash floods have occurred in several countries of the world, including Germany, China, and the United States, in the recent few weeks. However, while some locations see an abundance of rainfall, others experience a scarcity of it. They aren’t all sitting about waiting for Mother Nature to shower them with affection, though. Researchers in the United Arab Emirates are taking matters into their own hands to try to solve the problem.

It was always going to be hot in the UAE, given its location on or near the Tropic of Cancer in the Persian Gulf; between the dry, desert-heated winds coming in from neighboring Saudi Arabia and Oman and the humidity from the sea, winters tend to be toasty and summers unbearably sweltering.

For the purpose of reference, London receives 27.2 inches, New York receives 44.8 inches, and Las Vegas receives 6.2 inches.

It imports 80 to 90 percent of its food, thus rain is not critical for food production in the nation.

One of the motivations for taking drastic steps to make it rain (and bearing the financial burden—according to Forbes, the UAE has spent more than $15 million on ‘rain enhancement initiatives’) was to alleviate drought conditions.

The compounds act as a type of scaffold onto which water molecules may attach themselves, causing them to become heavy enough to fall to the earth as rain.

Scientists began looking for new ways to accelerate rainfall in response to concerns that pouring silver iodide and other chemicals into clouds may generate invisible but dangerous pollution on the ground.

During their research, they discovered that when cloud droplets have either a positive or negative electrical charge, the smaller droplets would mix to produce raindrops.

Custom-built drones with a six-foot wing span fly at low altitudes and are equipped with sensors that measure temperature, charge, and moisture.

There have been videos posted on social media in recent weeks showing not only that it is pouring in Dubai and the surrounding areas, but that it is raining so heavily that certain streets are flooding, which is an extremely unusual if not unheard of occurrence there.

pic.twitter.com/8IopLgIqNG — editorji (@editorji) on Twitter The date is July 22, 2021.

On top of the broader debate over geoengineering as a whole, there is an ongoing debate about cloud seeding in particular: how can we be certain that it is effective?

“You’ll never be able to say for definite what would have happened if you hadn’t seeded a certain region.” However, desperate circumstances necessitate even more extreme tactics.

The National Center of Meteorology in the United Arab Emirates has allegedly undertaken 126 cloud seeding flights so far this year, and it does not appear that the practice will be curtailed anytime soon. Image courtesy of Wael Hneinion via Unsplash

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