Where Is The Arch Of Palmyra In Dubai? (Solution)

A 3D replica of Syria’s historic 1,800-year-old Palmyra Arch of Triumph was unveiled at the World Government Summit – held at Dubai’s Madinat Jumeirah on February 12-14, 2017.

Was Palmyra rebuilt?

Palmyra is one of the most iconic world heritage sites. This lasted until the Timurids – a Turco-Mongol tribe – destroyed Palmyra during the 1400s. Again, Palmyra was rebuilt, although not to its former glory: it became a small village and was later occupied by the French until 1932.

What is a Syrian arch?

Richardsonian Romanesque: Syrian arch. H. H. Richardson. His arches are frequently not truly Romanesque but Syrian, an early Christian form which springs from ground level rather than from a supporting pedestal. – Virginia and Lee McAlester, A Field Guide to American Houses.

Who built Palmyra?

The Hebrew Bible (Second Book of Chronicles 8:4) records a city by the name “Tadmor” as a desert city built (or fortified) by King Solomon of Israel; Flavius Josephus mentions the Greek name “Palmyra”, attributing its founding to Solomon in Book VIII of his Antiquities of the Jews.

Why did Isis destroy the Temple of Bel?

Syria’s Director of Antiquities Maamoun Abdul Karim stated that ISIL was looking for treasures and “stores of gold” in the city. On 30 August 2015, the Associated Press reported that ISIS had partially demolished the temple by explosives, citing eyewitness accounts.

Does Palmyra still exist?

Palmyra is an ancient archaeological site located in modern-day Syria. The Syrian government retook the area in March 2016, and the ancient site—which has survived multiple wars and strife—remains a key historical and cultural treasure. Palmyra was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980.

What is Palmyra famous for?

Once called the “Pearl of the desert,” Palmyra, famous for its well-preserved Greco-Roman ruins, has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1980, renowned for its unique blend of Greek, Roman, Persian, and Islamic cultures.

In which country is the ancient city of Palmyra located?

An oasis in the Syrian desert, north-east of Damascus, Palmyra contains the monumental ruins of a great city that was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world.

When did the Temple of Baal fall?

Thought to have been invented by the Romans, the Roman triumphal arch was used to commemorate victorious generals or significant public events such as the founding of new colonies, the construction of a road or bridge, the death of a member of the imperial family or the accession of a new emperor.

Why is Palmyra in danger?

Urbanization and expansion from neighboring cities. With this also came increased tourism and pollution rise from transportation. Looting of stone sculptures from unexcited sites. In addition, looters also caused serious cracking in the foundations of ancient buildings.

When did Isis destroy Palmyra?

When Palmyra was recaptured by Syrian government forces in March 2016, retreating ISIL fighters blew up parts of the 13th-century Palmyra Castle, causing extensive damage.

What does the name Palmyra mean?

The name Palmyra, meaning “city of palm trees,” was conferred upon the city by its Roman rulers in the 1st century ce; Tadmur, Tadmor, or Tudmur, the pre-Semitic name of the site, is also still in use. The city is mentioned in tablets dating from as early as the 19th century bce.

Famous Palmyra arch to be re-created in Dubai

When the 1,800-year-old Arch of Triumph in Palmyra, Syria was demolished by Daesh extremists last year, it was rebuilt in Dubai, which is now under construction. As part of what London Mayor Boris Johnson described as a “defiance” gesture, the arch was just constructed in Trafalgar Square. Three-dimensional scanning technology and Italian marble were used to create the replica, which is 5.5 metres (20 feet) in height and is two-thirds the size of the original. A cooperative effort between Harvard University, the University of Oxford, and Dubai’s Museum of the Future, the Institute for Digital Archaeology (IDA) was responsible for the creation of the site.

“No one should have the authority to remove such monuments from our historical record,” says the president.

On its website, it notes that “from the first to the second centuries, the art and architecture of Palmyra, situated at the crossroads of multiple civilisations, united Greco-Roman techniques with local customs and Persian influences.” The replica arch will be on display in London for three days before traveling to Dubai, New York, and then returning to Palmyra, which was retaken from Daesh at the end of March after being under their control for around ten months.

Palmyra Arch recreated in London with Dubai and New York next

LONDON / The City of London is a cosmopolitan metropolis. On Tuesday, a painstaking reproduction of one of the most recognizable structures destroyed by ISIL in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra was displayed in Trafalgar Square in London. The original structure was demolished by ISIL in 2014. The six-metre-tall scale copy of the 1,800-year-old Arch of Triumph was carved in the northern Italian province of Tuscany utilizing precision digital technologies, such as 3D modeling, to create a replica that is six times the size of the original.

  1. The Institute of Digital Archaeology (IDA), located in the United Kingdom, came up with the idea for the project, which is a collaboration between Harvard University, the University of Oxford, and Dubai’s Museum of the Future.
  2. Before the Syrian crisis started in 2011, the city was a popular tourist destination, famed for its ancient ruins, colonnaded avenues, and temples that were more than 2,000 years old.
  3. A number of the city’s most prominent monuments were demolished, and the old amphitheatre was utilized for public executions by the radicals.
  4. “The Syrian people’s way of life is based on their cultural identity, and Palmyra represents one of the most unique and exceptional cultural heritage sites, not only in Syria, but in the entire world,” said Maamoun Abdulkarim, Syria’s top antiquities official.
  5. The replica arch in Trafalgar Square, in front of the National Gallery of Great Britain, began construction on Monday, according to the National Trust.

In Mr Johnson’s words, “this is an arch of victory, and in many respects, it represents a triumph of technology and will.” In a spirit of defiance, we’ve come here to show our support for the barbarians who destroyed the original, just as they’ve destroyed so many other artifacts throughout Syria and the Middle East.” With this arch, the IDA has achieved its greatest visibility to far.

It claims to be sending around 5,000 low-cost 3D cameras to volunteers throughout the world, who will subsequently upload the images to an open-source database for public use. * According to Agence France-Presse

Monumental Arch of Palmyra – Wikipedia

Monumental Arch
قوس النصر
Ruins of the Monumental Arch in 2010
Alternative names Arch of Triumph Arch of Septimius Severus
General information
Status Destroyed, some stonework survives
Type Ornamentalarch
Architectural style Roman/Palmyrene
Location Palmyra,Syria
Coordinates 34°32′59.9″N38°16′15.6″E / 34.549972°N 38.271000°E
Completed 3rd century
Destroyed October 2015
UNESCO World Heritage Site
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iv
Designated 1980(4th session)
Part of Site ofPalmyra
Reference no. 23
State Party Syria
Region Arab States
Endangered 2013–present

TheMonumental Arch, also known as the Arch of Triumph (Arabic: ) or the Arch of Septimius Severus (Arabic: ), was a Roman decorative archway in the Syrian city of Palmyra. It was constructed during the reign of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus in the third century. Its remains thereafter became one of the most popular tourist sites in Palmyra, where they remained until they were formally destroyed by ISIS in 2015. The majority of its masonry has survived, and plans are in the works to reconstruct it utilizing anastylosis.

History

When the Monumental Arch was completed, it was somewhere during the reign of EmperorSeptimius Severus, which lasted from 193 to 211 AD. It served as a connection between the Colonnade and the Temple of Bel, connecting the two principal streets of Rome. Given that it is situated at a point where the street’s orientation changes by 30 degrees between the Tetrapylon and The Temple Of Bel, it was intended to serve as a link between the southern and central sections of the Colonnade. To address this issue, the arch was designed to incorporate two façades that were angled apart from one another.

The edifice was sometimes incorrectly referred to as “Hadrian’s Arch,” despite the fact that Emperor Hadrian had been deceased for more than half a century at the time of its construction.

During the 1930s, work on the Monumental Arch was completed.

Architecture

A close-up of the Monumental Arch When seen from an architectural perspective, the Monumental Arch was exceptional in that it featured a double façade that concealed a 30° curve between the eastern and central parts of the Great Colonnade. There was a big doorway in the center, with smaller openings on either side, and a smaller entryway on either side of the arch. Intricate stone carvings were used to embellish the archway, including reliefs portraying vegetation and mathematical patterns. These were comparable to those found on other arches erected during Severus’ reign in other parts of the Roman Empire, such as in Leptis Magna in modern-day Libya, where they were found on other arches built during Severus’ era.

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The Palmyra Arch replica, located in Geneva, Switzerland, was completed in 2019.

Destruction

The city of Palmyra was conquered by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant in May of this year. Some time later, the militants booby-trapped the arch, and on October 4, it was claimed that the arch had been detonated by dynamite. The footage taken on 8 October indicated that half of the building was still intact, but by the time the Syrian Army captured Palmyraby in March 2016, just a small portion of the arch construction survived. The demolition of the Monumental Arch was criticized by the Syrian government as well as the Director-General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Reconstructing the arch would not be difficult, according to a Syrian official, because many of its stones have survived the ravages of time.

The replica was 20 feet (6.1 meters) in height and was carved out of Egyptian marble in Italy by machinery using a 3D computer model.

For three days, it was on exhibit at that place before being transported to a variety of other cities, including New York City; Florence; Geneva; Washington, D.C; and Dubai.

Following that, it will be shipped to Syria. The restoration of the Arch will begin on November 12, 2021, and will last for several years.

References

  1. Richard Stoneman is a well-known author (1994). Zenobia’s Revolt Against Rome: The History of Palmyra and Its Empire Daniel Demeter, University of Michigan Press, p. 192, ISBN 978-0-472-08315-2
  2. AbcdefDemeter, Daniel (3 August 2015). “Palmyra – Monumental Arch,” SyriaPhotoGuide.com, accessed April 25, 2019. In an article that was first published on February 5, 2016, Charles Gates said: (2011). Antiquity Cities: The Archaeology of Urban Life in the Ancient Near Eastern and Egyptian Civilizations, as well as in Greece and Rome TaylorFrancis, p. 406, ISBN 9781136823282
  3. Ab”Palmyra – The Colonnade”, romeartlover.tripod.com
  4. TaylorFrancis, p. 406. ISBN 9781136823282
  5. TaylorFrancis, p. 406. The original version of this article was published on December 10, 2015
  6. AbKaphle, Anup (5 October 2015). “This Is The Monumental Arch That ISIS Destroyed In Palmyra,” the caption reads. BuzzFeed. The original version of this article was published on 5 February 2016
  7. Millin, Aubin Louis
  8. Noel, François
  9. Warens, Israel (1799). Page 413 of the Magasin encyclopédique: ou Journal des sciences, lettres et arts, Volume 1 (in French)
  10. AbMullen, Jethro
  11. Elwazer, Schams
  12. Elwazer, Schams (6 October 2015). “ISIS smashes the Arch of Triumph amid the ruins of Palmyra, Syria.” “ISIL blows up Arch of Triumph in Syria’s Palmyra”, CNN, 5 February 2016, retrieved from the original on 5 February 2016. Al Jazeera English, October 5, 2015. The original version of this article was published on October 8, 2015
  13. El Deeb, Sarah (5 October 2015). “The demolition of Palmyra’s arch is condemned by the Syrian government.” According to the Associated Press. “UNESCO says it is ‘terrified by history’ following the devastation of Palmyra,” according to a report published on February 5, 2016. 5th of October, 2015, according to Yahoo! News. “The Islamic State demolishes the 2,000-year-old Arch of Triumph in Palmyra,” according to a report published on February 5, 2016. The Telegraph, published on October 5, 2015. On November 3, 2015, the original version of this article was archived. Kareem Shaheen and Emma Graham-Harrison are the authors of this article (27 March 2016). “Syrian regime forces retake ‘all of Palmyra’ from Isis,” according to the Associated Press. The Guardian is a British newspaper. On March 27, 2016, the original version of this article was archived. Stephen Farrell is a writer who lives in the United Kingdom (28 March 2016). When everything else fails, 3D models and robots may be able to rebuild Palmyra, according to the article. According to the New York Times. On April 1, 2016, the original version of this article was archived. Lauren Turner is a writer who lives in the United States (19 April 2016). “The Arch of Triumph of Palmyra has been reconstructed in London.” BBC. de Bruxelles, Simon (April 20, 2016)
  14. Archived from the original on April 20, 2016. (30 March 2016). “After Trafalgar Square, a replica arch leads to Palmyra,” says the author. The New York Times. Restoration work on Palmyra’s historic Arch of Triumph will commence on November 12th, according to an article published on April 20, 2016, which was subsequently archived. Syrian Arab News Agency is a news organization based in Syria. 10th of April in the year 2021

Commons has media related to Palmyra’s Monumental Arch (Wikimedia Commons).

Destroyed Syrian Palmyra Arch replica to travel to Dubai

A 2,000-year-old triumphal arch that was demolished by Daesh in Syria has been rebuilt in London’s Trafalgar Square – this time in a replica form. The Arch of Triumph at Palmyra was a component of one of the most extensive ancient archaeological complexes in the world, which included a number of other structures. The building of the triumphal arch is well underway! — Digital Archaeology (@DigiArchaeo) is a Twitter account dedicated to digital archaeology. The 31st of March, 2016 Before the Syrian civil conflict started in 2011, the historic city, which is a Unesco World Heritage Site, was one of the country’s most popular tourist destinations.

Following the unveiling of an enormous scale copy of Palmyra’s Triumphal Arch in Trafalgar Square on Tuesday, April 19, 2016, by Mayor Boris Johnson and Executive Director of the Institute for Digital Archaeology (IDA) Roger Michel, the Arch will be permanently installed in the square.

AP The arch, which was constructed between A.D.

211 under the reign of the Roman emperor Septimius Severus, towered above the colonnaded streets of the ancient city, which served as a connection between the Roman Empire and Persia.

AP As Roger Michel, executive director of the Institute for Digital Archaeology, explained, “When I witnessed the damage, I felt compelled to do something to try to put things back in their proper place.” The institution is a cooperative initiative between Harvard University, the University of Oxford, and Dubai’s Museum of the Future, and it is funded by the National Science Foundation.

AP “The first thing that sprang to me when I watched the destruction of Palmyra was that these people are attempting to edit history,” Michel added.

Before flying to destinations such as New York and Dubai — and finally to the ancient city of Palmyra — the group will stop in London for three days.

Dubai’s 3D-printed Palmyra arch replica wins award

Dubai: It has been announced that a 3D-printed replica of Palmyra’s Arch of Triumph, which was created by the Dubai Future Foundation (DFF) in order to preserve the historical gateway to the ancient Syrian city, has been awarded the Public Engagement with Research Award, which is sponsored by Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford, has won the Public Engagement with Research Award. An international collaboration involving DFF, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco), the British Institute for Digital Archaeology, and the Universities of Oxford (United Kingdom) and Harvard University resulted in a duplicate of the original being created (USA).

  • The ultimate objective is to protect the region’s rich history and cultural assets from being vandalized or otherwise destroyed.
  • “It is a recognition of the validity of DFF’s Dubai Future Agenda,” said the organization.
  • He stated that the Palmyra Arch of Triumph project serves as an impetus for the foundation to continue its goal in collaboration with key partners from all around the world, including the United States.
  • It also appeared in Dubai during the World Government Summit, Florence during the G7 Summit, and the Khaled Al Asaed Archaeological Museum in Arona, Italy, among other places.
  • The copy weighs 11 tonnes and is 20 feet tall, whereas the real arch weighs 11 tonnes and measures 20 feet tall.

This year’s prize will be divided into three categories: Projects, Capacity Building, and Early Career Researchers.

The Triumphal Arch — The Institute for Digital Archaeology

The Triumphal Arch from the Palmyra site in Syria, which was demolished last year, will be the focal point of our Trafalgar Square exhibit, which will be a scale replica of the arch. After being built in Trafalgar Square using state-of-the-art 3D technology, the arch will be unveiled to the public on Tuesday, April 19, and will remain there until the end of the year. Everyone is invited to the formal public debut, which will take place at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19th. “ Our ability to record and preserve objects of great historical significance against loss and damage, as well as to share facsimiles of these objects for exhibition to people all over the world who would otherwise not have the opportunity to see these artifacts of our shared history, is made possible by the Million Image Database.

For those who believe they can wipe away our human legacy by acts of devastation, there is a message included within the Million Image Database effort that they should pay attention to.

It is our will to live together and to work together for our humanity that is a positive force that has the ability to reconstruct everything that has been destroyed.

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It is a magnificent collaborative endeavor in which everyone has the chance to join, and the Million Image Database is the culmination of that work.

It is not only a significant example of how we can work together to make positive contributions to preserving monuments and artifacts that represent our collective past and cement our future that this collaboration between Dubai’s Museum of the Future Foundation, The Institute for Digital Archaeology, and UNESCO is.

  • Many monuments and artifacts commemorating the achievements of golden ages in our region have been destroyed as a result of the war that has engulfed our region in recent years.
  • It’s a message to them, informing them that what they are attempting to destroy can be saved.
  • Our excitement at being able to bring together so many individuals from all over the world to work on this vital project of historical restoration and preservation comes from the fact that it is possible.
  • It is with reverence for the history and heritage represented by these objects that the IDA is undertaking the reconstruction of the lost monuments of the Middle East.

Although our work is vital, we also consider it to be a significant gesture of friendship and solidarity with people living in war zones – people with whom we share a common history that is symbolized by the same items and monuments that we are attempting to safeguard and preserve.” Interdisciplinary Institute for Digital Archaeology (IIDA) Executive Director Roger Michel

Why Recreating the Palmyra Arch Is Smug, Hypocritical, and Tacky

The Triumphal Arch from the Palmyra site in Syria, which was demolished last year, will be the focal point of our Trafalgar Square display, which will be atop a scale replica of the original. The arch, which was created using cutting-edge 3D technology, will be unveiled in Trafalgar Square on Monday, April 18th, and will be available to the public on Tuesday, April 19. At 1 p.m. on Tuesday, April 19th, the public will be invited to the formal public launch. “ Our ability to record and preserve objects of great historical significance against loss and damage, as well as to share facsimiles of these objects for exhibition to people all over the world who would otherwise not have the opportunity to see these artifacts of our shared history, is made possible through the Million Image Database.

For those who believe they can wipe away our human legacy by acts of devastation, there is a message included within the Million Image Database endeavor.

Our desire to live together, to work together for our humanity, is a positive force that may help to reconstruct everything that has been destroyed by others.

It is a magnificent collaborative endeavor in which everyone has the chance to join, and the Million Image Database is the culmination of this work.

It is not only a significant example of how we can work together to make positive contributions to preserving monuments and artifacts that represent our collective past and cement our future that this collaboration between Dubai’s Museum of the Future Foundation, The Institute for Digital Archaeology, and UNESCO is.

  • Many monuments and artifacts commemorating the achievements of golden ages in our region have been destroyed as a result of the war that has engulfed our region in recent decades.
  • As a result of this partnership between Dubai’s Museum of the Future Foundation, The Institute for Digital Archaeology, and UNESCO, we will be able to physically turn the clock back and repair the harm done by the nihilists.
  • Both their destruction and their philosophy are in vain.
  • As a consequence, some of the most spectacular achievements of the ancient world may not only be preserved for future generations to enjoy, but can also be replicated anywhere in the globe for the enjoyment of all of mankind thanks to 3D printing technology.” – The Honorable Mr.
  • It is with reverence for the history and heritage represented by these objects that the IDA is undertaking the reconstruction of the lost monuments of the Middle East.

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Palmyra’s Arch of Triumph recreated in Trafalgar Square

Trafalgar Square in London has been graced with the unveiling of a gigantic reconstruction of the damaged Arch of Triumph in the Syrian city of Palmyra. After the 1,800-year-old arch was demolished by Islamic State militants in October, a 6-metre (20-foot) replica was created in Italy from Egyptian marble as a show of resistance, meant to demonstrate that restoration of the historic structure is feasible if the desire is there. Marble is being carved into the arch by Italian craftsmen in Carrara.

  • They all carried their languages and cultures along with them as well as their faiths and deities.
  • “No one was so nasty, so nihilistic, so pitifully inadequate as to desire to demolish that arch,” says the narrator.
  • “Can you tell me how many digits Daesh deserves?
  • “No one would have ever considered it.” A large and complicated repository of cultural narratives are monuments – as representations of history, religion, art, and science – which are important and complex repositories.
  • “When history is wiped in this manner, it must be restored as soon as possible and, of course, with due consideration.” The arch is decorated with intricate sculptures.
  • It is getting closer to being finished at Trafalgar Square with the repair of the arch.
  • “The Syrian people’s way of life is based on their cultural identity, and Palmyra represents one of the most unique and remarkable cultural heritage sites not just in Syria, but indeed in the whole globe,” said the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights.
  • In this archived photo from 2014, you can see the Arch of Triumph.
  • According to the IDA, it was a challenge in terms of both engineering and digital technology.
  • “Without rebuilding, damaged places would eventually be swallowed up by the sands and forgotten, taking with them the history for which they served as the last remaining visual markers,” the authors write.

“The IDA is committed to breaking the cycle of exploitation and to assisting in the preservation of the heritage of an area that shaped the cultural, intellectual, scientific, and architectural traditions of the globe,” said the organization.

Replica of Syrian arch destroyed by Isis unveiled in New York City

In New York on Monday, a replica of Palmyra’s Arch of Triumph was revealed, nearly a year after Islamic State terrorists demolished the real landmark. Despite the fact that the arch, which dates back 1,800 years, was destroyed by ISIS last October, a team of archeologists from Oxford University’s Institute for Digital Archaeology (IDA) set about recreating it as a show of resistance to the extremist group’s rampant acts of cultural destruction in Iraq and Syria. The arch, which is two-thirds the size of the original, is made of Egyptian marble and was constructed using 3D printing technology, which was used to create the arch using pictures of the original arch.

  • In addition to damaging artifacts, the extremist organization looted and resold them in order to raise money for its operations.
  • Forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who were also accused of plundering Palmyra’s artifacts, finally reclaimed the historic city in March 2016.
  • In April of last year, it was on exhibit at Trafalgar Square in London, and it will be on show at City Hall Park for one week before moving on to its next destination, Dubai.
  • A large number of visitors, including those visiting city hall and the neighboring World Trade Center memorial, and employees on their lunch periods frequently use the park.
  • A reconstruction of the Palmyra arch, a Roman arch that was destroyed by Isis, will be on exhibit in City Hall Park in New York City starting this week.
  • Nevertheless, in New York City, the arch is flanked by ultra-modern buildings and architectural icons, such as One World Trade Center and the Woolworth building.
  • “It is our goal that the arch, which is itself a symbol of destruction and rebirth, will serve as a reminder to visitors of the universality of pain as well as the tenacious human potential to reconstruct what has been destroyed,” the statement said.

In her remarks during the opening, deputy mayor Alicia Glen stated that the arch “served as a statement that we would not tolerate terrorist attacks, that we will not tolerate people being slaughtered and expelled from their country.” Only two days before, a blast in the city’s Chelsea area resulted in the deaths of 29 people.

H.H. Mohamed bin Zayed and Irina Bokova Unveil 3D Replica Model of Palmyra Arch at the World Government Summit — Dubai Future Foundation

During the World Government Summit, which took place at Dubai’s Madinat Jumeirah on February 12-14, 2017, a 3D reproduction of Syria’s famous Palmyra Arch of Triumph, which dates back 1,800 years, was revealed. In attendance were His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the United Arab Emirates and Ruler of Dubai, as well as His Highness Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the UAE Armed Forces, and His Highness Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Crown Prince of Dubai, as well as His Highness Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed Al Maktoum, Deputy Prime Their Highnesses were accompanied by Ms Irina Bokova, Director-General of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, and Mrs Christine Lagarde, Managing Director of the World Bank.

  1. The Dubai Future Foundation and the Oxford Institute of Digital Archaeology collaborated to create a copy of the historic Arch of Palmyra, which was demolished in 2015.
  2. The one-of-a-kind strategic effort makes use of current technology to conserve the heritage and history of human civilizations all over the world, making it a first in the world.
  3. Using cutting-edge photography technology, one million images of the region’s ancient antiquities were scanned and stored in an effort to ensure that they were preserved for future generations.
  4. Initially unveiled in London, then in New York City, and now in Dubai, the 3D Arch of Palmyra has been viewed by thousands of people.
  5. New technologies – such as those in photography, printing, and 3D sculpting – have been created by experts and scientists from the Dubai Future Foundation and the Oxford Institute of Digital Archeology that are capable of producing very accurate digital scans.
  6. With the backing of the Dubai Future Foundation, the portal has already published more than half a million photographs and delivered 5,000 digital cameras with 3D features to the project’s partners and volunteers.
  7. The Palmyra Arch of Triumph replica was constructed with the use of 3D technology and actual pictures of the monument in question.

The procedure took conducted in Italy, and Egyptian marble was utilized in the construction. The monument, which weighs around 11 tons and stands almost 20 feet tall, is approximately two-thirds the size of the original monument, which weighed approximately 30 tons.

‘Palmyra arch’ that Dubai group helped create draws millions in Italy

It will be on show in Italy until July 30th, and it is a 3D reproduction of the Palmyra Arch. PHOTO CREDIT: SUPPLIER The ‘Palmyra arch,’ which was built with the assistance of the Dubai company, attracts millions of visitors to Italy. DUBAI – The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a member of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC). A copy of Syria’s renowned Palmyra Arch, which was built with the assistance of a Dubai-based company, attracted two million people in only two days during its most recent stop in the Italian city of Arona in Sicily.

  1. Scientists are rushing to acquire one million three-dimensional pictures of these Syrian cultural monuments that are in danger of being destroyed by the terrorist group Daesh.
  2. Deputy Mayor of Florence Dario Nardella and Italian Culture Minister Dario Franceschini inaugurated the arch in Arona’s Piazza della Signori, where it made its fourth and final visit after appearances in London and New York, as well as in Dubai and Abu Dhabi.
  3. Omar Al Asaad and Walid Al Asaad were among those who spoke at the occasion.
  4. This strength will be translated into action by promoting the notion of cultural diplomacy across the world and creating awareness about the importance of cultural heritage preservation.
  5. It was constructed in Italy with the use of 3D technology, Egyptian mable, and actual photos of the structure.
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In a statement, Abdullah Bin Touq, DFF’s Acting CEO, said, “The Dubai Future Foundation was committed to playing a role in the recreation of the Palmyra Arch of Triumph to underline the potential of future technologies – such as 3D printing – to preserve nations’ history and heritage while also catalyzing their development.” The initiative is part of a collaboration between the United Arab Emirates, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, and the Oxford Institute of Digital Archaeology.

DAJ/Expat MediaShare is a joint venture between DAJ and Expat MediaShare.

Palmyra’s Arch of Triumph recreated in London

AP is the source of the image. Caption for the image Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, dedicated the structure at Trafalgar Square. Trafalgar Square in London has been transformed into a facsimile of a Syrian structure that was two millennia old until it was demolished by the so-called Islamic State in Syria. In accordance with images of the original arch, the Institute of Digital Archaeology (IDA) created a scale replica of the Arch of Triumph out of Egyptian marble using 3D technology, which was then cast in plaster.

In a statement, Syria’s head of antiquities described it as a “act of unity.” In his remarks during the unveiling of the building, London Mayor Boris Johnson described the replica as “an arch of technology and resolve.” He told the crowds that they had assembled “in defiance of the barbarians” who had demolished the arch in the city, which is located north-east of Syria’s capital Damascus, the previous year.

‘Common heritage’

The Romans were responsible for the construction of the initial arch. Three days after its debut in Trafalgar Square, the two-thirds size replica will travel to other cities across the world, including New York and Dubai, for further exhibition. It is envisaged that it will be transported to Palmyra next year, where it will find a permanent home alongside the original arch, according to Roger Michel, executive director of the Oxford-based International Development Agency (IDA). a caption for the media The monument was reconstructed with the help of 3D modeling software.

According to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, a monitoring organisation located in the United Kingdom, at least 280 individuals were killed by the regime during their takeover of the city.

He emphasized that the project’s goal was restoration rather than construction, and that the modern technology and the remnants of the site will be used to recreate the old structures rather than constructing them from scratch.

“We’re making an effort to be realistic.” But what we really want to accomplish is respect the scientific process as well as the historical significance of Palmyra.” Getty Images is the source of this image.

The attack on Palmyra prompted Mr Michel to determine that the International Development Agency’s Million Images Database initiative – which distributes 3D cameras to volunteers in countries such Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq – may be used to respond.

Ancient city of Palmyra

  • Site designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site There are huge ruins of a magnificent city on the site, which was once one of the most significant cultural centers of the ancient world
  • The site also has a museum. Greco-Roman techniques are combined with local customs and Persian influences in art and building from the first and second centuries, respectively. Its archaeological complex had more than 1,000 columns, a Roman aqueduct, and a massive necropolis with more than 500 graves
  • It was discovered in the early 1900s. Before the Syrian crisis, more than 150,000 visitors visited Palmyra every year.

Site included on the Unesco World Heritage List There are huge ruins of a magnificent city on the site, which was once one of the most significant cultural centers in the ancient world; the site also has a museum. Greco-Roman methods are combined with local customs and Persian influences in art and building from the first and second centuries. In total, the archaeological site had over a thousand columnar structures as well as a massive necropolis with over 500 graves; it also included a Roman aqueduct.

‘Not making a statement’

Site included on the Unesco World Heritage List; There are huge remnants of a magnificent city on the site, which was once one of the most significant cultural centers of the ancient world. Greco-Roman methods are combined with local customs and Persian influences in the art and architecture of the first and second centuries. The archaeological complex consisted of more than 1,000 columns, a Roman aqueduct, and a powerful necropolis with more than 500 graves. Before the Syrian crisis, more than 150,000 visitors visited Palmyra each year.

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Site designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site; The site features the massive ruins of a magnificent metropolis that was once one of the most prominent cultural centers in the ancient world. The art and architecture of the first and second centuries mix Greco-Roman methods with local customs and Persian influences; The archaeological complex included more than 1,000 columns, a Roman aqueduct, and a powerful necropolis with more than 500 graves. Prior to the Syrian crisis, more than 150,000 visitors visited Palmyra each year.

Palmyra Arch Destroyed by ISIS Rises Again in Central London

Site designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site There are huge ruins of a magnificent city on the site, which was once one of the most significant cultural centers of the ancient world; the site also has a museum. Greco-Roman techniques are combined with local customs and Persian influences in art and building from the first and second centuries, respectively. Its archaeological complex had more than 1,000 columns, a Roman aqueduct, and a massive necropolis with more than 500 graves; it was discovered in the early 1900s.

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